You are browsing the archive for florianwieser.

Condatos 2017 and Abrelatam: Latin American Open Data Conference

- September 8, 2017 in Allgemein, Daten, event, International

Until one month ago, I had the pleasure to work as a community manager for Opendata.ch, co-coordinating the “Business Innovation food.opendata” and supporting different food-related open data projects that came out of the Open Food Hackdays in February 2017. In the beginning of August, I changed the scenery. For the coming year, I’m going to be studying in Costa Rica in Central America, finishing my Master’s degree in Strategy and International Management. Living in this new context and in a new culture, I was very curious how the open data world would look like in this part of the world. Two weeks ago, from August 23 to 25, 2017, I now had the chance to take part in the regional open data conference of Latin America, taking place in San José, Costa Rica. With this blog post, I would like to share with you the impressions I had and what the open data movement in Latin America is all about. In the following lines I will describe the various conversations with people from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, and all the way down until Argentina.

Open Data in Latin America – A civil society movement

Latin America is a region that faces a lot of issues – ranging from corrupt governments to lack in infrastructure and services to large inequalities in income and wealth. In times of digitalization, these inequalities become even bigger as the lack in infrastructure and resources leads to an inaccessibility to new technologies and education for many people in the region – widening ever more the gap between the more privileged and the poor. In order to close this gap, various civil society organizations started to collect their own data with the help of citizens in order to visualize and get information about the problems existing in the different countries. Further, many journalists are switching to data journalism in order to discover irregularities within the processes of sometimes corrupt governments. Open Data also helps governments themselves to keep transparency and figure – avoiding the huge economic costs that corruption entails. The Abrelatam and Condatos 2017 conferences were a gathering of around 300 civil society and data journalism practitioners from all over Latin America – including countries like Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina – together forming a community to jointly address these issues.

Creativity is key

It was very impressive to see, with what professionality and creativity this conference was presented. The open data community in Latin America did a very good job in However, not only the visual design of the conference was very appealing. The conference itself consisted of a very interesting mix between collaborative brainstorming in form of an unconference – Abrelatam – the day before the actual two days of conference, where participants could share their thoughts and concerns. The following days were between talks and interactive workshops, allowing people to simultaneously gain more knowledge and apply this directly in practice. The issues talked about, the professional and creative presentation – especially in comparison to other events in Latin America – and a very motivated and inspired crowd made this gathering a very progressive and creative space where innovation actually could happen.

Open Data is a government priority

Who thinks that open data in Latin America is a minor movement that takes place at the periphery of society by a few geeks is very wrong. Facing a lot of challenges innovative governments in Latin America have recognized that in order to solve the social issues they need the help of the civil society and it’s citizens. That governments have recognized the potential that lies in open data is maybe best materialized in the presence of the President of the Republic Costa Rica who was present in the closing ceremony of the conference where he hold a keynote speech. In his words, there is a strong necessity for institutions to change and this can only take place in an interplay between governments, civil society and academia. Costa Rica actually started an initiative called “Gobierno Abierto” (Engl.: “Open Government”). Also in the panel about fighting corruption with open data it become clear that many of the Latin American governments are honestly attempting to make administration processes more efficient and transparent through open data. The way to go however still remains very large.

Where is Open Data in Latin America going?

Finally, it is to say that open data is in a very interesting stage in Latin America. This in the sense that the collection and publication of data through citizens actually can contribute to detect and visualize and create new solutions for problems that exist through a lack of governmental and institutional voids. Unfortunately, the role of businesses in this process hasn’t been discussed at large during this conference. Even though there were sessions on how to scale impact of open data initiatives and how to create business models, these were not merely targeted towards big corporations in the region. However, there seems to be a big potential for businesses especially in countries where there often exist a lack of basic government services. Finally, it became very clear among all the participants that there is a need for a change in mindset within Latin America’s society in order to push the agenda of the open data movement further. The fact that governments are starting to take on the efforts of the open data movement seems promising, but it also becomes clear that the members of the conference are far from being a representative sample of the Latin American society. In this sense, open data has to be pushed even further and be made more inclusive for the region’s citizens. All in all, I spent some very interesting days in San José where I met many very engaged and highly talented people pushing the open data agenda for Latin America further. As described, I personally think that this community consists over some very valuable skills in this region of the world to have a big influence and become a force for positive change – I will be very glad to follow this further. By Florian Wieser, September 5, 2017, from San José, Costa Rica.

Condatos 2017 and Abrelatam: Latin American Open Data Conference

- September 8, 2017 in Allgemein, Daten, event, International

Until one month ago, I had the pleasure to work as a community manager for Opendata.ch, co-coordinating the “Business Innovation food.opendata” and supporting different food-related open data projects that came out of the Open Food Hackdays in February 2017. In the beginning of August, I changed the scenery. For the coming year, I’m going to be studying in Costa Rica in Central America, finishing my Master’s degree in Strategy and International Management. Living in this new context and in a new culture, I was very curious how the open data world would look like in this part of the world. Two weeks ago, from August 23 to 25, 2017, I now had the chance to take part in the regional open data conference of Latin America, taking place in San José, Costa Rica. With this blog post, I would like to share with you the impressions I had and what the open data movement in Latin America is all about. In the following lines I will describe the various conversations with people from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, and all the way down until Argentina.

Open Data in Latin America – A civil society movement

Latin America is a region that faces a lot of issues – ranging from corrupt governments to lack in infrastructure and services to large inequalities in income and wealth. In times of digitalization, these inequalities become even bigger as the lack in infrastructure and resources leads to an inaccessibility to new technologies and education for many people in the region – widening ever more the gap between the more privileged and the poor. In order to close this gap, various civil society organizations started to collect their own data with the help of citizens in order to visualize and get information about the problems existing in the different countries. Further, many journalists are switching to data journalism in order to discover irregularities within the processes of sometimes corrupt governments. Open Data also helps governments themselves to keep transparency and figure – avoiding the huge economic costs that corruption entails. The Abrelatam and Condatos 2017 conferences were a gathering of around 300 civil society and data journalism practitioners from all over Latin America – including countries like Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina – together forming a community to jointly address these issues.

Creativity is key

It was very impressive to see, with what professionality and creativity this conference was presented. The open data community in Latin America did a very good job in However, not only the visual design of the conference was very appealing. The conference itself consisted of a very interesting mix between collaborative brainstorming in form of an unconference – Abrelatam – the day before the actual two days of conference, where participants could share their thoughts and concerns. The following days were between talks and interactive workshops, allowing people to simultaneously gain more knowledge and apply this directly in practice. The issues talked about, the professional and creative presentation – especially in comparison to other events in Latin America – and a very motivated and inspired crowd made this gathering a very progressive and creative space where innovation actually could happen.

Open Data is a government priority

Who thinks that open data in Latin America is a minor movement that takes place at the periphery of society by a few geeks is very wrong. Facing a lot of challenges innovative governments in Latin America have recognized that in order to solve the social issues they need the help of the civil society and it’s citizens. That governments have recognized the potential that lies in open data is maybe best materialized in the presence of the President of the Republic Costa Rica who was present in the closing ceremony of the conference where he hold a keynote speech. In his words, there is a strong necessity for institutions to change and this can only take place in an interplay between governments, civil society and academia. Costa Rica actually started an initiative called “Gobierno Abierto” (Engl.: “Open Government”). Also in the panel about fighting corruption with open data it become clear that many of the Latin American governments are honestly attempting to make administration processes more efficient and transparent through open data. The way to go however still remains very large.

Where is Open Data in Latin America going?

Finally, it is to say that open data is in a very interesting stage in Latin America. This in the sense that the collection and publication of data through citizens actually can contribute to detect and visualize and create new solutions for problems that exist through a lack of governmental and institutional voids. Unfortunately, the role of businesses in this process hasn’t been discussed at large during this conference. Even though there were sessions on how to scale impact of open data initiatives and how to create business models, these were not merely targeted towards big corporations in the region. However, there seems to be a big potential for businesses especially in countries where there often exist a lack of basic government services. Finally, it became very clear among all the participants that there is a need for a change in mindset within Latin America’s society in order to push the agenda of the open data movement further. The fact that governments are starting to take on the efforts of the open data movement seems promising, but it also becomes clear that the members of the conference are far from being a representative sample of the Latin American society. In this sense, open data has to be pushed even further and be made more inclusive for the region’s citizens. All in all, I spent some very interesting days in San José where I met many very engaged and highly talented people pushing the open data agenda for Latin America further. As described, I personally think that this community consists over some very valuable skills in this region of the world to have a big influence and become a force for positive change – I will be very glad to follow this further. By Florian Wieser, September 5, 2017, from San José, Costa Rica.

Opendata.ch lanciert mit Engagement Migros Innovationsprogramm rund um Food Daten

- November 2, 2016 in National

Du bist, was du isst, was du misst: auch in der Ernährung fallen mehr und mehr Daten an, Produktion, Vertrieb und Verzehr produzieren laufend Datenströme, in denen Potenzial für grosse Fortschritte schlummert. Welches Essen ist genau jetzt genau richtig für mich? Ist das auf meinem Teller klimafreundlich, koscher, vegan, fair, vereinbar mit meiner Allergie? Das heute lancierte Dreijahres-Programm «Business Innovation food.opendata.ch» unterstützt kreative, unternehmerische und wissenschaftliche Projekte im Bereich Lebensmitteldaten auf dem Weg von der ersten Idee zur Marktreife mit neuen offenen Daten, intensiver Begleitung und auch finanziellem Support. Neue Geschäftsmodelle dank offener Daten
Das Programm zielt darauf hin, eine öffentlich verfügbare Basis an Nahrungsmitteldaten bereitzustellen, neue innovative und wertschöpfende Lösungen zu entwickeln und wissenschaftlich begleitet die Nutzung öffentlich verfügbarer Daten für unternehmerische Zwecke weiterzuentwickeln. Dazu Florian Wieser, Community Manager des Programms: «Essen ist unglaublich wichtig, sozial wie ökonomisch, und auch hier ist die Digitalisierung ein riesiges Thema. Das Innovationsprogramm food.opendata.ch schafft dafür ein grosses offenes Labor für neue Anwendungen, neue Wertschöpfungs- und Geschäftsmodelle.» Das dreijährige Programm kann dank der Unterstützung durch den Förderfonds Engagement Migros lanciert werden, der Pionierprojekte im Bereich der digitalen Wertschöpfung ermöglicht. Sylvie Reinhard von Engagement Migros: «Mit diesem Programm loten wir die Potenziale und Chancen der Schweiz im Bereich der Digitalisierung aus und bauen eine Innovations- und Unternehmercommunity rund um Food Daten auf. Die Schweiz braucht solche Communities, wenn sie bei der unternehmerischen Umsetzung von Innovationen eine führende Rolle spielen will.» Derzeit laufen die Vorbereitungen zum ersten grossen Anlass von food.opendata.ch bereits auf Hochtouren. Die «Open Food Data Hackdays» bringen am 10. und 11. Februar 2017 Big Data Spezialisten und Nahrungsmittelexperten, Softwareentwicklerinnen, Landwirte, Köche und App-Designerinnen, Studenten, Unternehmerinnen und viele andere zusammen. Während zwei Tagen widmen sie sich dem sogenannten rapid prototyping rund um Food Data, und zwar gleichzeitig an den zwei Austragungsorten Zürich und Lausanne. Derzeit werden verschiedene Datenquellen vorbereitet, nicht zuletzt auch über die Plattform openfood.ch des Projektpartners Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL). Mehr Informationen unter http://food.opendata.ch und auf Twitter bei @OpendataCH. Über Opendata.ch: Opendata.ch ist Teil der Open Knowledge Foundation und damit einer globalen Bewegung, die mittels der Öffnung von Daten Transparenz und Innovation, Effizienz und Mitbestimmung voranbringt. Offene Daten geben neuen Akteuren neue Möglichkeiten und werden auch von Unternehmen immer mehr als Katalysator für offene Innovationsprozesse genutzt. Opendata.ch wird durch den Präsidenten André Golliez geführt, gemeinsam mit einem Vorstand aus Medien, Technologie und Wissenschaft. Über Engagement Migros: Der Förderfonds Engagement Migros ermöglicht Pionierprojekte im gesellschaftlichen Wandel, die neue Wege beschreiten und zukunftsgerichtete Lösungen erproben. Im Bereich Wirtschaft unterstützt Engagement Migros zahlreiche Innovationsprogramme und Kollaborationsplattformen wie den Kickstart Accelerator, den Impact Hub Zürich oder das Basler Coworking Programm Fluxdock. Der wirkungsorientierte Förderansatz verbindet finanzielle Unterstützung mit coachingartigen Leistungen im Pionierlab. Engagement Migros wird von den Unternehmen der Migros-Gruppe mit jährlich circa zehn Millionen Franken ermöglicht und ergänzt seit 2012 das Migros-Kulturprozent. Kontakt:
Florian Wieser,
Community Manager Opendata.ch,
Mobile +41 79 290 86 52,
florian.wieser@opendata.ch Sylvie Reinhard,
Engagement Migros, Direktion Kultur und Soziales Migros-Genossenschafts-Bund,
Mobile +41 76 387 31 57,
sylvie.reinhard@mgb.ch