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Make Things Do Stuff to Mobilise 100,000 Young Makers Across UK

- June 6, 2013 in creative technology, event, Featured, london, make things do stuff, mozilla, nesta, projects, uk, video design, webmaker

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Creative Web Literacy is an increasingly important issue. I’ve written about it. Many others have written about it. But what are we all doing about it?

One of the campaigns I’m proud to be involved with here in London is …

Make Things Do Stuff to Mobilise 100,000 Young Makers Across UK

- June 6, 2013 in creative technology, event, Featured, london, make things do stuff, mozilla, nesta, projects, uk, video design, webmaker

< ! -- magazine.image = https://design.okfn.org/files/2013/06/1.jpg -- > welcome

Creative Web Literacy is an increasingly important issue. I’ve written about it. Many others have written about it. But what are we all doing about it?

One of the campaigns I’m proud to be involved with here in London is …

Make Things Do Stuff to Mobilise 100,000 Young Makers Across UK

- June 6, 2013 in creative technology, event, Featured, london, make things do stuff, mozilla, nesta, projects, uk, video design, webmaker

Creative Web Literacy is an increasingly important issue. I’ve written about it. Many others have written about it. But what are we all doing about it? One of the campaigns I’m proud to be involved with here in London is Make Things Do Stuff, a UK-wide network of like-minded organisations including Freeformers, Technology Will Save Us, […]

Open Design, Year One: Hardware, Ideas and Community

- May 2, 2013 in Featured, projects

It’s been a great first year for our Open Design network – we hit the 100 mark on our discussion list, delivered a keynote lecture at LibreGraphics, launched v0.1 of the Open Design Definition, planned a new design hardware challenge in France and helped run the world’s first Open Knowledge Festival in Finland. We even […]

Open Design, Year One: Hardware, Ideas and Community

- May 2, 2013 in Featured, projects

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It’s been a great first year for our Open Design network – we hit the 100 mark on our discussion list, delivered a keynote lecture at LibreGraphics, launched v0.1 of the Open Design Definition, planned a new design hardware …

Open Design, Year One: Hardware, Ideas and Community

- May 2, 2013 in Featured, projects

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It’s been a great first year for our Open Design network – we hit the 100 mark on our discussion list, delivered a keynote lecture at LibreGraphics, launched v0.1 of the Open Design Definition, planned a new design hardware …

Exploring ‘Openness’ Together: The Open Book to be Launched Friday at FutureEverything

- March 18, 2013 in Featured, OKFest, Open Book

The Open Book From makerspaces to data wrangling schools to archives, the digital is being remixed by the open – and it is changing society as we know it. New concepts about public information, transparency and the Commons are combining in unprecedented ways, resulting in a breadth of transformative collaborations. Nations across the globe seek formal understandings of how to open up government. What we all really mean by ‘open’, however, remains intriguingly vague. The movement for open knowledge has been an attempt to start this conversation. In 2009, the Open Knowledge Foundation released the Open Definition for the first time, setting out principles to that defined “openness” in relation to data and content and aiming to ensure interoperability between different terms of open material. It has since been translated into over 20 languages and has inspired similar projects, such as the Open Design Definition we are building on Github to unite makers and hardware builders across paradigms. In 2011 the pioneering Data Driven Journalism Handbook was born at a 48 hour workshop at MozFest in London. Organisations like Creative Commons, Mozilla and the Free Software Foundation each have their own ways of interpreting ‘openness’ as seen in the continued debates surrounding non-restrictive CC license releases, Open Source versus Free Software methodologies and Open Web manifestos. Despite these efforts, the question remains — what is so important about ‘open’? Enter The Open Book, an ambitious crowdsourced publication built jointly with our friends at The Finnish Institute in London as a part of the critical Reaktio series. Inspired by the world’s first Open Knowledge Festival this fall in Helsinki, The Open Book explores the social and technological manifestations of this emergent movement for the first time, featuring over 25 in-depth thought pieces written by pioneers of openness around the world from London to São Paulo. The Open Book The group of contributors to The Open Book is a colourful one, including the Free Software Foundation’s Karsten Gerloff, Open Data Manchester’s Julian Tait, the Centre for Sustainable Communications’ Jorge Luis Zapico, The Guardian’s Simon Rogers, the Open Hardware Summit’s Catarina Mota, IBM’s Ville Peltola, Open Design Now‘s Peter Troxler, the Harvard Berkman Centre for Internet & Society’s Mayo Fuster Morelli and the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Rufus Pollock. Each piece explores a unique aspect of the open knowledge movement and how it has affected work, society and culture across paradigms, from government to business to design to education. Also included is “The Evolution of Open Knowledge”, the world’s first crowdsourced timeline of openness from 1425 to the current day which we asked you to contribute to earlier this year. Due to the divisive nature of such an experimental publication, we do not attempt to present any single argument on what ‘open’ is. Instead, we hope The Open Book will serve as a platform for discussion and a launching pad for new ideas about the future of a global open knowledge movement in a time of rapid technological progress. Through the process of building this publication, we’ve learned a few important things — first, the term ‘open’ is not a panacea in itself, and second that we certainly differ on the specifics of what it should be. We’ve also learned that despite our differences, this movement nevertheless finds commonalities in the shared belief that transparency is key to good governance, inclusivity in public participation and strong civil societies. We humbly thank those of you who sent us contributions, argued with us, shared your ideas and helped us understand the open knowledge movement through your words. It’s been a deeply enriching process for all of us on the editorial team. Lastly, we are happy to announce that The Open Book will be launched in Manchester this Friday, March 22nd at the FutureEverything Conference. Everyone is welcome to attend; browse the flyer below for details about time and location. We hope to see you there, and look forward to the many discussions (and lively debates!) yet to come as a result of this wonderful project! Open Book at Future Everything 2013
The Open Book will be available in print at FutureEverything and online as a freely-available PDF under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license. Its contributors retain individual copyright over their respective contributions, and have kindly agreed to release them for the book under the terms of this license.

Global Community Stories #1: Australia, France, Greece and Finland!

- March 13, 2013 in Featured, Meetups, OKF Australia, OKF Finland, OKF France, OKF Greece, OKFN Local

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A new monthly digest showcasing initiatives from local communities across the globe

As you may have seen, the Open Knowledge Foundation’s many (30+!) Local Group communities have been hard at work over the last month, launching several exciting new initiatives, opening up data and engaging regional communities in interesting ways. Given these new developments, we are happy to launch the first installment of the Global Community Voices series, a monthly wrap-up of some of the most interesting actions and initiatives happening in open knowledge communities around the world.

In Australia, a set of local mapping hackdata events

In Melbourne, the Australian Local Group is planning a set of public community events focused on mapping, data and the neighbourhood. Says Local Group organiser David Flanders, “I think mapping data is going to be a key tool for us and other Local Groups to help make regional data come alive. We are organising a series of hackdata events together with the help of friends from The Age newspaper, TileMill and OpenStreetMap to do cool things like producing printed cycle maps of Melbourne.” The best part about this event series? “This is the type of thing anyone in any country can do! Who doesn’t want a beautiful printed map?”

In France, new projects around food security and energy conservation

In France, local organisers related to the Open Knowledge Foundation France Initiative have introduced community-focused open knowledge projects in two areas that have become increasingly salient for consumers and producers alike — food security and energy conservation. The first emergent project, Open Food Facts, is a free, open collaborative database of food facts from around the world that aims to help consumers make better choices about what they put in their body. Based on these interactions, Open Food Facts hopes to motivate existing industries to take more care over the production of their food. A blog post with more details about this new project can be found here — and if you’d like to join the movement, the Open Food Facts team is currently collaborating with the Open Sustainability Working Group to get more people involved from around the world. The second project, Open Transition Energie, is a collaborative website focused on “sharing, exploring and visualising data and other useful resources to engage with the national debate on energy transition” from a French perspective. Its members have also started a thematic group on the French open data platform NosDonnées.fr to share and reuse data related to this debate. Its organisers add, “We want to promote the work of researchers, engineers, journalists, NGOs and citizens who are interested in the question of the energy transition — so please let us know if you’d like to contribute or share a resource!”

In Greece, praise from Neelie Kroes for a new data portal

As you might have read on this blog last week, we were all quite excited to hear about the launch of a new self-hosted Greek Data Portal run by the talented team behind the Open Knowledge Foundation Greece Initiative, which integrates our data management software CKAN. We were even more excited to find out that European Commission Vice President Neelie Kroes had released a public note of support for the new portal! Says Ms. Kroes, “At a time when many Greeks are looking for new sources of inspiration and hope, I am pleased to say that the Open Knowledge Foundation is one of those sources. I encourage all public bodies to support this effort.”

In Finland, a call for regional working groups

Moving North, in Finland local organisers ran a very successful OKFN Finland Convention last month – and they have introduced another way to get involved with their efforts to engage citizens in open knowledge from a Finnish perspective – local installments of our thematic Working Groups, from Open Science to Open Government! Says the Open Knowledge Foundation Finland ry, “We hope that these regional instalments of Working Groups can work towards concrete change in Finland but also collaborate internationally, in the spirit of ‘think globally, act locally’”. For interested Finns, the OKF FI Board is accepting applications here until March 13, 2013. That’s it for this edition – big thanks to local organisers in Australia, France, Greece and Finland for their great ideas and innovative new projects! We’ll be back next month with more exciting news from even more member nations across our Local Groups network, so definitely stay tuned! Featured Image thanks to Daniel Schildt and used originally by the OKFN Finland Convention team.

Institute of Making Announces London Opening — But How Open?

- January 25, 2013 in Design Principles, event, Featured

A bit of good news for UK-based designers and hardware enthusiasts interested in making, building and experimenting — the Institute of Making is finally holding its “Grand Public Opening“ on Saturday 16 March from 1pm onwards in London. As someone who has been in London a few years, I’ve often wished there was a stronger […]

Institute of Making Announces London Opening — But How Open?

- January 25, 2013 in Design Principles, event, Featured

Makers at the Aalto FABLab in Helsinki. Photo thanks to Henrico.

A bit of good news for UK-based designers and hardware enthusiasts interested in making, building and experimenting — the Institute of Making is finally holding its Grand