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Open Knowledge Belgium Spring – Summer Update

- August 4, 2016 in belgium, Chapters, network

With only one full-time employee, the Belgian Open Knowledge ship is only a small one to sail. Nonetheless, Pieter-Jan Pauwels has proven to be a worthy captain. The rest of the crew consists of a bunch of student positions, interns, volunteers and of course, the Open Knowledge Belgium board. Even though Open Knowledge Belgium is such a small team, we’re quite proud of what we’ve achieved the past few months. Let’s start with Diplohack Brussels. In April we co-organised the first Diplohack Brussels in the Council of the European Union, together with the Dutch Presidency of the EU. The 24-hour hackathon focused on creating more transparency within the Brussels Bubble with the Council of the European Union introducing their Council vote Open Dataset.   Then, we got to present a crowdsourcing project we’ve been working on for quite some time. W4P (“We For Progress”) is an crowdsourcing tool that allows you to build your own crowdsourcing platform! This project was funded by CHEST Project, a European consortium of partners working around streamlining funding for small to medium scale social innovation projects. At the moment open Summer of code 2016 takes place. That’s a four-week programme that allows students to work on open innovation projects. While having a student job for the summer, they learn more about coding and other hard skills, and gain more soft skills such as working in a team and giving pitches. We act as a sort of match maker between companies and students. Organisations come to us with open source projects and meanwhile we recruit students and put the right student on the right project. Only skilled and enthusiastic students who are willing to learn, may enter #oSoc.   According to us, open Summer of code is one of the most important projects for Open Knowledge Belgium. We educate students and companies about open source and open innovation at one hand, and provide students with real-life experience. Experience that can make a difference when you’re looking for your first job. It’s also one of our projects that doesn’t have any governmental funding. It’s our sixth edition so far, but we’re thinking about rebranding it next year. Open Summer of code is no longer only about code: It’s about so much more. Beside front- and back-enders, we need students who are skilled in UI/UX design, business development, marketing and communication. Also, we don’t only deliver pure code, we aim for complete projects. Going from brainstorming and coding to marketing and presenting, you need to be a jack of all trades, not only a king of code. By rebranding, we hope to attract more diverse profiles and spread the open knowledge word among other publics too. open Summer of code 2016 – After Movie from Open Knowledge Belgium on Vimeo. We’re curious what the future will bring. The Belgian government tries to implement more open data and open knowledge, but those are still baby steps. There’s a lot of room for improvement, and thus a lot of room for Open Knowledge Belgium to grow. At the moment, we have five working groups about themes such as mobility and tourism, but we got a few requests for working groups about new themes such as university (college) data and open badges. Yup, the Belgian chapter most certainly has a bright future ahead of it – one where our little raft might turn into a nice ship.

2015, our year in review

- December 24, 2015 in 2015, Featured, General, Open Data

Since 2016 is approaching rapidly, we decided to look back on 2015. We collected a few highlights from 2015, some from the Belgian Open Data scene and some that were important to us, as Open Knowledge Belgium. Will you join us on our trip through 2015? We wish you a happy New Year and an open 2016!

2015, our year in review

- December 24, 2015 in 2015, Featured, General, Open Data

Since 2016 is approaching rapidly, we decided to look back on 2015. We collected a few highlights from 2015, some from the Belgian Open Data scene and some that were important to us, as Open Knowledge Belgium. Will you join us on our trip through 2015? We wish you a happy New Year and an open 2016!

2015, our year in review

- December 24, 2015 in 2015, Featured, General, Open Data

Since 2016 is approaching rapidly, we decided to look back on 2015. We collected a few highlights from 2015, some from the Belgian Open Data scene and some that were important to us, as Open Knowledge Belgium. Will you join us on our trip through 2015? We wish you a happy New Year and an open 2016!

Belgian federal Open Data policy, a summary.

- November 26, 2015 in digital Belgium, federal government, Open Data News, open data policy

In July, we told you about the earnest plans of the federal government regarding Open Data. Today, we’re happy to share the federal Open Data policy. Here’s a short summary. Below the summary, we’ve linked to the original policies.
  • We’re talking about data that governments collected during their activities, that has no privacy or intellectual property rights. They will be released in an machine-readable format and can be used for commercial and non-commercial purposes.
  • The federal government also focuses on creating a community, consisting out of companies and citizens.
  • All governmental data will act in accord to the the comply or explain principle.
  • By 2020, all data will be available proactively, without any need for registration for companies or citizens who want to use the data. In the meantime, data demanded by citizens and companies will be prioritized.
  • All data will be licensed under CC0. If not, the comply or explain principle is applied.
  • To ensure the authenticity of the data, all data must originate from the federal sources. Every civil service will be responsible of publication and management of their data and meta-data. Meta-data ought to follow the European standard for data portals (DCAT-AP).
Do you want to read the original federal Open Data policy? There’s a Dutch version and a French one. We’ve been told an English version is on its way. We’ll be happy to share it here when it’s ready!

Belgian federal Open Data policy, a summary.

- November 26, 2015 in digital Belgium, federal government, Open Data News, open data policy

In July, we told you about the earnest plans of the federal government regarding Open Data. Today, we’re happy to share the federal Open Data policy. Here’s a short summary. Below the summary, we’ve linked to the original policies.
  • We’re talking about data that governments collected during their activities, that has no privacy or intellectual property rights. They will be released in an machine-readable format and can be used for commercial and non-commercial purposes.
  • The federal government also focuses on creating a community, consisting out of companies and citizens.
  • All governmental data will act in accord to the the comply or explain principle.
  • By 2020, all data will be available proactively, without any need for registration for companies or citizens who want to use the data. In the meantime, data demanded by citizens and companies will be prioritized.
  • All data will be licensed under CC0. If not, the comply or explain principle is applied.
  • To ensure the authenticity of the data, all data must originate from the federal sources. Every civil service will be responsible of publication and management of their data and meta-data. Meta-data ought to follow the European standard for data portals (DCAT-AP).
Do you want to read the original federal Open Data policy? There’s a Dutch version and a French one. We’ve been told an English version is on its way. We’ll be happy to share it here when it’s ready!

Belgian federal Open Data policy, a summary.

- November 26, 2015 in digital Belgium, federal government, Open Data News, open data policy

In July, we told you about the earnest plans of the federal government regarding Open Data. Today, we’re happy to share the federal Open Data policy. Here’s a short summary. Below the summary, we’ve linked to the original policies.
  • We’re talking about data that governments collected during their activities, that has no privacy or intellectual property rights. They will be released in an machine-readable format and can be used for commercial and non-commercial purposes.
  • The federal government also focuses on creating a community, consisting out of companies and citizens.
  • All governmental data will act in accord to the the comply or explain principle.
  • By 2020, all data will be available proactively, without any need for registration for companies or citizens who want to use the data. In the meantime, data demanded by citizens and companies will be prioritized.
  • All data will be licensed under CC0. If not, the comply or explain principle is applied.
  • To ensure the authenticity of the data, all data must originate from the federal sources. Every civil service will be responsible of publication and management of their data and meta-data. Meta-data ought to follow the European standard for data portals (DCAT-AP).
Do you want to read the original federal Open Data policy? There’s a Dutch version and a French one. We’ve been told an English version is on its way. We’ll be happy to share it here when it’s ready!

Datawijs, bridge between young people and open data

- October 27, 2015 in Datawijs, Featured, klynt, online platform, Open Data, Open Data News, projects, Video

Screenshot intro Datawijs Open data is gaining more importance these days. Yet, a lot of young people don’t know what open data is, or how they can benefit from it. That’s where Datawijs comes in. It’s an interactive video series, that introduces teenagers and young adults to the concept of open data. The Belgian platform works with Klynt, which allows the young people to view the videos in the order they want to. Thanks to the non-linear structure, users can learn on their own pace, about what interests them at whatever time they have.
Datawijs is developed in a way that every teen and young adult can learn about and experiment with open data, corresponding to their own needs. It has three types of information layers. First of all, there are the animated clips, which tells more about the open data subjects in an introductory way. Secondly, there’s the expert interviews, where experienced persons give more in-depth information on the subject. The third kind of videos are more interactive and encourages users to experiment with open data themselves. Whether it’s taking a quiz on open data or completing a data-search, young people can take their first steps in the open data matter. Datawijs even provides users with coding sites and open data portals, so that they can easily take it to the next level. Datawijs is developed by us, Open Knowledge Belgium, with support of Mediaraven. They chose to focus on teenagers and young adults, age 15-25. Of course, the online platform isn’t exclusively available for that age group, as anyone is free to use it. But why exactly does Datawijs target young people? The digital natives of today are the data literates of tomorrow. On top of that, it’s also an age group that starts to invest their own development and self-actualisation. Today, it can be quite hard for young people to find easy-to-consume information about open data online. Most info on that topic is too technical, static, fragmented or not in their maternal language. To them, open data may look like intangible, too theoretical and seemingly unimportant topic. Yet, non-technical and creative young people can be a great advantage. They can point out problems, select data based on their needs and give creative input on how to transform all this into an application. In order to facilitate this even more, the Datawijs series is in Dutch. This way, the Flemish youth is approached in their maternal language, making sure the language barrier is removed. Addressing teenagers and young adults in a visual, interactive and non-linear manner, is a good way to make open data easy approachable. The clips are designed to engage young people to take their first steps in open data. Not only will they benefit from it, by having the opportunity to create what they need, but also governments most certainly gain advantage by this. Their open data is used in useful applications and visualisations. In the long run, the now well-informed teens and young adults may even ask to open up the data they need. That’s why we consider it a must to transform digital natives into open data literates. The natives themselves and society benefit from it. By making the open data topic lightweight and easy to consume through an interactive video series, more young people might try to cross the open data bridge. It’s important open data becomes truly open to young people, as this will lead towards more and better use of it. Today, Datawijs is only available in Dutch. Luckily, the series is open source. We hope more versions of Datawijs will pop up in the near future, in order to reach out to digital natives everywhere.

Datawijs, bridge between young people and open data

- October 27, 2015 in Datawijs, Featured, klynt, online platform, Open Data, Open Data News, projects, Video

Screenshot intro Datawijs Open data is gaining more importance these days. Yet, a lot of young people don’t know what open data is, or how they can benefit from it. That’s where Datawijs comes in. It’s an interactive video series, that introduces teenagers and young adults to the concept of open data. The Belgian platform works with Klynt, which allows the young people to view the videos in the order they want to. Thanks to the non-linear structure, users can learn on their own pace, about what interests them at whatever time they have. Datawijs is developed in a way that every teen and young adult can learn about and experiment with open data, corresponding to their own needs. It has three types of information layers. First of all, there are the animated clips, which tells more about the open data subjects in an introductory way. Secondly, there’s the expert interviews, where experienced persons give more in-depth information on the subject. The third kind of videos are more interactive and encourages users to experiment with open data themselves. Whether it’s taking a quiz on open data or completing a data-search, young people can take their first steps in the open data matter. Datawijs even provides users with coding sites and open data portals, so that they can easily take it to the next level. Datawijs is developed by us, Open Knowledge Belgium, with support of Mediaraven. They chose to focus on teenagers and young adults, age 15-25. Of course, the online platform isn’t exclusively available for that age group, as anyone is free to use it. But why exactly does Datawijs target young people? The digital natives of today are the data literates of tomorrow. On top of that, it’s also an age group that starts to invest their own development and self-actualisation. Today, it can be quite hard for young people to find easy-to-consume information about open data online. Most info on that topic is too technical, static, fragmented or not in their maternal language. To them, open data may look like intangible, too theoretical and seemingly unimportant topic. Yet, non-technical and creative young people can be a great advantage. They can point out problems, select data based on their needs and give creative input on how to transform all this into an application. In order to facilitate this even more, the Datawijs series is in Dutch. This way, the Flemish youth is approached in their maternal language, making sure the language barrier is removed. Addressing teenagers and young adults in a visual, interactive and non-linear manner, is a good way to make open data easy approachable. The clips are designed to engage young people to take their first steps in open data. Not only will they benefit from it, by having the opportunity to create what they need, but also governments most certainly gain advantage by this. Their open data is used in useful applications and visualisations. In the long run, the now well-informed teens and young adults may even ask to open up the data they need. That’s why we consider it a must to transform digital natives into open data literates. The natives themselves and society benefit from it. By making the open data topic lightweight and easy to consume through an interactive video series, more young people might try to cross the open data bridge. It’s important open data becomes truly open to young people, as this will lead towards more and better use of it. Today, Datawijs is only available in Dutch. Luckily, the series is open source. We hope more versions of Datawijs will pop up in the near future, in order to reach out to digital natives everywhere.

Datawijs, bridge between young people and open data

- October 27, 2015 in Datawijs, Featured, klynt, online platform, Open Data, Open Data News, projects, Video

Screenshot intro Datawijs Open data is gaining more importance these days. Yet, a lot of young people don’t know what open data is, or how they can benefit from it. That’s where Datawijs comes in. It’s an interactive video series, that introduces teenagers and young adults to the concept of open data. The Belgian platform works with Klynt, which allows the young people to view the videos in the order they want to. Thanks to the non-linear structure, users can learn on their own pace, about what interests them at whatever time they have. Datawijs is developed in a way that every teen and young adult can learn about and experiment with open data, corresponding to their own needs. It has three types of information layers. First of all, there are the animated clips, which tells more about the open data subjects in an introductory way. Secondly, there’s the expert interviews, where experienced persons give more in-depth information on the subject. The third kind of videos are more interactive and encourages users to experiment with open data themselves. Whether it’s taking a quiz on open data or completing a data-search, young people can take their first steps in the open data matter. Datawijs even provides users with coding sites and open data portals, so that they can easily take it to the next level. Datawijs is developed by us, Open Knowledge Belgium, with support of Mediaraven. They chose to focus on teenagers and young adults, age 15-25. Of course, the online platform isn’t exclusively available for that age group, as anyone is free to use it. But why exactly does Datawijs target young people? The digital natives of today are the data literates of tomorrow. On top of that, it’s also an age group that starts to invest their own development and self-actualisation. Today, it can be quite hard for young people to find easy-to-consume information about open data online. Most info on that topic is too technical, static, fragmented or not in their maternal language. To them, open data may look like intangible, too theoretical and seemingly unimportant topic. Yet, non-technical and creative young people can be a great advantage. They can point out problems, select data based on their needs and give creative input on how to transform all this into an application. In order to facilitate this even more, the Datawijs series is in Dutch. This way, the Flemish youth is approached in their maternal language, making sure the language barrier is removed. Addressing teenagers and young adults in a visual, interactive and non-linear manner, is a good way to make open data easy approachable. The clips are designed to engage young people to take their first steps in open data. Not only will they benefit from it, by having the opportunity to create what they need, but also governments most certainly gain advantage by this. Their open data is used in useful applications and visualisations. In the long run, the now well-informed teens and young adults may even ask to open up the data they need. That’s why we consider it a must to transform digital natives into open data literates. The natives themselves and society benefit from it. By making the open data topic lightweight and easy to consume through an interactive video series, more young people might try to cross the open data bridge. It’s important open data becomes truly open to young people, as this will lead towards more and better use of it. Today, Datawijs is only available in Dutch. Luckily, the series is open source. We hope more versions of Datawijs will pop up in the near future, in order to reach out to digital natives everywhere.