You are browsing the archive for Mikael Seppälä.

Open Knowledge Festival 2019 planning kickoff Thu 22.10.

- November 9, 2018 in Events, OK Festival

Welcome to join us for the Open Knowledge Festival 2019 kickoff at Maria 01, door 5E, room Nudist on Thu 22.10. 17-18:30! Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/870128053377047/ Finland hosted the Open Knowledge Festival back in 2012 and it was one of the igniting moments from Open Knowledge Finland. The event featured talks, tracks and workshops on a diverse range of issues related to openness such as Open Data, Open GLAM, Open Democracy, Open GIS to name just a few. Since our good friends at the MyData conference decided to go global with it’s own organization this year perhaps 2019 might be the year we highlight the other cool stuff related to openness that is in the works and bubbling under to reinvent what Open Knowledge and Open Knowledge Finland is all about. The conference is just an idea now but let’s explore what we’d like to make out of it! Join the #okfest2019 channel on the Open Knowledge Finland Slack to continue the discussion: https://okfi.slack.com/messages/CE1APPXE2/ In case you’re not yet on the OKFI Slack, you can get an invite here: https://okfi-slack.herokuapp.com/ The post Open Knowledge Festival 2019 planning kickoff Thu 22.10. appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Collective Intelligence: Solving Problems at Scale 23.10.2018

- October 22, 2018 in Events, Featured, ResponsiveOrg Finland

Tuesday 23.10.2018 16:30-18:30 Maria 01/Classroom: https://www.facebook.com/events/321675121922917/
Professor Thomas Malone from MIT, author of the book Superminds – The Suprising Power of People and Computers Thinking Together, defines Collective Intelligence as “the result of groups of individuals acting together in ways that seem intelligent.”
Collective Intelligence is nothing new. In nature we see superorganisms like ant colonies that are able to coordinate their collective efforts without centralized overview. Humanity has developed their own models of Collective Intelligence that have, according to Malone, taken for example the forms of hiearchies, democracies, markets, collectives and ecosystems. However, with the rise of connected technologies based on the Internet, data, AI, IoT and Blockchains to start with, the issue of creating new forms of Collective Intelligence has risen. As Thomas Malone puts it:
“How can people and computers be connected so that—collectively—they act more intelligently than any person, group, or computer has ever done before?”
We are starting to have very diverse examples of this phenomenon ranging from Open Source communities, Amazon’s Mechanical Turk that organizes crowds to work on repetitive tasks, Google’s search engine which uses AI and clicks done by humans to prioritize search results and the largest encyclopedia ever made in Wikipedia. But what we don’t have yet is a general understanding on what makes people and machines work together in the best possible ways and how to harness that knowledge to solving problems at scale. I was privileged to be invited to and participate in Nesta’s event Designing collective intelligence – Mobilising humans and machines to address social needs which sought to bring together the community of people working around the topic. You can check out the presentation materials here:
How might we promote the advancement of Collective Intelligence here in Finland?

This is the topic of our Collective Intelligence – Solving Problems at Scale event. You’re welcome to join in on Tuesday 23.10.2018 16:30-18:30 at Maria 01/Classroom. Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/321675121922917/ You might have stumbled into a competition where people are asked to guess the amount of candy in a large jar. Mysteriously, the average of all the people guessing turns out to be pretty close. You’ve heard the old phrase: the smartest person in the room is the room. On the other hand, computers beat humans in simple, repetitive tasks at scale but humans tend to be more creative. What a combination it would be if we had the ability to harness crowds and operate both at scale and in a creative manner? Nowadays drones are used in humanitarian crises such as hurricane relief to help with mapping areas in need of human assistance. A global, internet-enabled network of digital humanitarians is then used to do analysis of the footage to help with coordination efforts. What if we could create organizations that were able to describe the tasks that need to be done to fulfil a purpose and distribute those tasks to a global network of freelancers that never sleeps? Welcome to an evening of an intro into Collective Intelligence: Solving Problems at Scale hosted by Open Knowledge Finland’s Mikael Seppälä. Learn what it is and discuss where we might see the first examples of it in Finland. Collective Intelligence is one of those rising multidisciplinary approaches that seeks to utilize different types of crowds, machines and enable collaboration that far exceeds the forms of collaboration we see today. You can be a social scientist, a facilitator, a designer, a data scientist or just someone interested in budding forms of collaboration. Sources: Geoff Mulgan: Big Mind: How Collective Intelligence Can Change Our World Nesta: Designing collective intelligence – Mobilising humans and machines to address social needs (event) SAGE Publication’s new journal on Collective Intelligence Collective Intelligence 2018: From Open Knowledge and Network Organizations to Technology-enabled Intelligence Tietoasiantuntija 2-3/2018: Inhimillisyyden ja teknologian liitto johdattaa työn uudelle aikakaudelle The post Collective Intelligence: Solving Problems at Scale 23.10.2018 appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Enlivening the Community at Open Knowledge Finland Retreat 2018

- October 19, 2018 in blog, Events

A merry gang of 17 people got together on 12-13.10.2018 for our annual Open Knowledge Finland 24h retreat at Kisakeskus near Raasepori, about 90 km from Helsinki. The weekend featured talks, good food including Tapola’s black sausage, booze an evening at the sauna where Mika lost his glasses and a bunch of bonding. Art of Hosting: Circles for Participatory sensemaking and Open Space Since some of our members had participated in a Art of Hosting event during the summer that many others were also interested in, we decided to try out some of the methods during our retreat. We set up our chairs in a circle for participatory sensing and governance about our general experiences, consent-based decision-making for taking everybody into account and Open Space Technology to host open discussions on the topics that people are interested in. Even though openness has been a core value for Open Knowledge Finland since it’s beginning in 2012, we are still just beginning to learn the self-management methods that might support us support being diverse in opinions, inclusive in accepting the variance and simultaneously be efficient enough in moving forward. It’s not only about using the methods but also about growing together with a shared mindset, which is difficult in our decentralized organization that is based on mostly fleeting meetings with each other. Discussion topics OKRs – Objectives and Key Results What is Open Knowledge Finland? A mapping exercise We have so many things going on in Open Knowledge Finland that it’s hard for any of us, and especially newcomers, to get a good idea of who we are. We did a quick exercise in mapping some of our communities that can generally be divided into two categories: the Open Knowledge folks and those focusing on Open Collaboration. You can see our result here: Strategy Communications & Marketing What is Teal? ResponsiveOrg/Participatory Team Practices On Saturday we looked into the Open Collaboration practices (they can be seen here: http://okf.fi/opencollab) that we’re exploring in Open Knowledge Finland. We have introduced just a few of them and are looking to try out some new ones. We don’t really have a process for introducing them and they are not actively in use everywhere. One of the new ones we started discussing is organizing in circles and a “Talkootarjotin”, exposing microtasks to volunteers. Starting a Circle for Website Renewal & Talkootarjotin We decided to discuss organizing in circles and the Talkootarjotin in a separate session. We started discussing how we might start a circle for the renewal of our website. We decided to look into Sociocracy 3.0 patterns on Defining Agreements (https://patterns.sociocracy30.org/defining-agreements.html) to explore how we might use participatory circles to organize in both static and temporary ways. Here’s what a Website Circle might look like: We also ended up ideating and creating a new community of Open Knowledge Allies to participate by volunteering to help us with microtasks. You can read about it here: https://fi.okfn.org/open-knowledge-allies-lets-get-sht-done/ General Feelings on the Weekend We had new people initiated into eating the Finnish delicacy, Tapola’s black sausage: Jelena got inspired to write poetry that included Mika’s lost glasses: Ansku & Zizi “found” some footage in which the crew gets latino: Key takeaways from a newcomer’s perspective Attended 4 open sessions in total, Open Knowledge / OKFI in a nutshell Going back into the basic question of what, why and how of OK/OKFI has taught me about the fundamental principles of OK as a whole and its impact to the community. Learned about the difference between workgroups and projects which I assumed to be of similar in function prior to participating the session. Gained insights about the various domain-specific groups (workgroups) and how each groups are interwoven around the OK sphere. Open collaboration in OKFI Learned about how OKFI is selecting, testing and applying different methodologies when collaborating with others in areas such as, project development, brainstorming, workshops and etc. Some open colab practices were even used during the retreat such as, circles and Consent over Consensus OKRs Learned on how to evaluate and set realistic / achievable and actionable goals (objectives) and how or steps to achieve it and measured. Circles It was amazing to witnessed how the session started from looking into the theoretical side of circles and immediately applying it into practical means, in this case for website revamped circle. This was my first time to participate in a retreat that has utilized open space sessions and in my opinion it turned out be a success. The culture of openness and respectfulness was also observed throughout the retreat, where everyone was given a chance to speak and to be heard. Overall, the OKFI one day retreat was an invaluable experience for me, lots of learning, amazing people and awesome sauna session. How to Participate Next? Join Open Knowledge Allies & let’s get sh*t done! Want to contribute your time to the purpose of creating a fair and open digital society by means of Open Knowledge and Open Collaboration? We have a bunch of initiatives, tasks and roles we might need YOUR help with. Join Open Knowledge Allies to help us out and collaborate with us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/okallies Join the Open Knowledge Finland Slack for the discussion, you can get an invite here: https://okfi-slack.herokuapp.com/ And join the #OKAllies channel: https://okfi.slack.com/messages/CDEKT7M55/ The post Enlivening the Community at Open Knowledge Finland Retreat 2018 appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Hack4FI – Hack your heritage -tapahtumassa ennätysmäärä osallistujia!

- October 10, 2018 in avoin glam, Featured

Avoimiin kulttuuriperintöaineistoihin keskittyvä hackathon Hack4FI – Hack your heritage järjestettiin Helsingin kaupunginmuseossa 5.–7.10.2018. Neljättä kertaa järjestettyyn ilmaiseen tapahtumaan rekisteröityi 100 osallistujaa – ennätysmäärä poikkiammatillisesta yhteistyöstä ja kulttuuriaineistojen luovasta uudelleenkäytöstä kiinnostuneita osanottajia. Viikonlopun aikana kaupunkilaiset ja kansainväliset vieraat ideoivat yhteensä 18 uutta avoimille aineistoille perustuvaa konseptia, palvelua ja teosta kaikkien käyttöön. Yleisö valitsi suosikikseen teoksen Into the Wild Box, jonka ideoivat ja toteuttivat Thu Nguyen ja Vatte Wickström. Into the Wild Box on interaktiivinen ja immersiivinen installaatio, joka on saanut inspiraationsa Jean Sibeliuksen mukanaan kantamasta tulitikkurasiasta. Sibelius piti rasiassa sammalta ja neulasia suomalaisesta metsästä. Hengittämällä näiden tuoksua hän pystyi siirtymään hajuaistin voimalla inspiraation lähteille. Into the Wild Box -installaatiossa huoneesta itsestään tulee tulitikkurasia, jonka käyttöliittymänä on niin ikään tulitikkuaski. Kun rasia on suljettu, seinäprojisoinnit ja äänet kuvaavat kaupungin elämää Sibeliuksen aikana. Kun rasiaa raottaa, kattoprojisointi aukeaa päästäen luonnon sisään muuntaen seinäprojisoinnit metsäksi. Taustalla soi Sibeliuksen sävellys Kuusi, joka voimistuu, kun rasiaa avataan. Installaatiossa käytettiin Kansallisgallerian avoimia taideteoskuvia sekä Ylen Elävän arkiston ja äänitearkiston aineistoja. Hack4FI:n tavoitteena on edistää ihmisten osallisuutta kulttuuriin ja historiaan sekä lisätä tietoa digitaalisesta kulttuuriperinnöstämme. Tänä vuonna tapahtumassa oli työstettävänä seitsemän eri teemaa, jotka käsittelivät kansallista muistiamme eri näkökulmista. Teemojen taustaorganisaatioina olivat tänä vuonna YLE, Suomen valokuvataiteen museo, Helsingin kaupunginmuseo, Kansallisgalleria, Kansallisarkisto, Aalto-yliopiston arkisto, Musiikkimuseo Fame, Open Knowledge Finland ja Wikimedia Suomi. Osallistujien käytössä oli myös arkistojen, kirjastojen ja museoiden aineistoja yhteen kokoava Finna.fi-palvelu. Finna-rajapinnan kautta kuka tahansa saa käyttöönsä yli 13 miljoonan aineiston kuvailutiedot esimerkiksi uusien verkkopalveluiden kehittämistä varten. Toinen avoimen tiedon yhteistyökumppani oli HRI – Helsinki Region Infoshare -palvelu, joka kokoaa yhteen pääkaupunkiseudun avointa dataa ja sen avulla toteutettuja sovelluksia. Lisäksi Gallen-Kallelan Museo, Mannerheim-museo, Kansallismuseo, Museovirasto ja Musiikkiarkisto tarjosivat avoimia aineistojaan kaikkien hyödynnettäväksi. Tapahtuman yhteistyökumppaneita olivat hävikkiruokaravintola Loop, Helsingin Sanomain Säätiö, CoolHead Brew, Misc Management ja Wide -hackathon. Hanke on saanut rahoitusta Museoviraston avustuksista museoiden innovatiivisiin hankkeisiin. Lisätietoja: Hack4FI – Hack Your Heritage: http://hack4.fi/ Video yleisön suosikiksi valitusta työstä Into the Wild Box: http://vatte.github.io/img/hack4fi/IMG_5317.mov The post Hack4FI – Hack your heritage -tapahtumassa ennätysmäärä osallistujia! appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Avoimet kulttuuriaineistot käyttöön kulttuurihackathonissa!

- October 1, 2018 in avoin glam, Featured

Avoimiin kulttuuriperintöaineistoihin keskittyvä hackathon Hack4FI – Hack your heritage! järjestetään Helsingin kaupunginmuseossa 5.–7.10.2018. Neljättä kertaa pidettävään ilmaiseen tapahtumaan on rekisteröitynyt noin 90 moniammatillisesta yhteistyöstä ja kulttuuriaineistojen luovasta uudelleenkäytöstä kiinnostunutta osallistujaa. Viikonlopun aikana kaupunkilaiset ja kansainväliset vieraat ideoivat uusia avoimille aineistoille perustuvia konsepteja, palveluita ja teoksia kaikkien käyttöön. Hackathonin tavoitteena on edistäa ihmisten osallisuutta kulttuuriin ja historiaan sekä lisäämään tietoa digitaalisesta kulttuuriperinnöstämme. Viikonlopputapahtumassa työstetään suomalaisten taide- ja kulttuuriorganisaatioiden vapaasti käytettävissä olevia aineistoja, esimerkiksi valokuvia, taideteoskuvia, videoita, karttoja, arkkitehtuuripiirroksia ja historiallisia tekstejä. Tapahtumassa on seitsemän eri teemakokonaisuutta, jotka tarjoavat näkymiä kansalliseen muistiimme. Kokonaisuudet ovat koonneet YLE, Suomen valokuvataiteen museo, Helsingin kaupunginmuseo, Kansallisgalleria, Kansallisarkisto, Aalto-yliopiston arkisto, Musiikkimuseo Fame, Open Knowledge Finland ja Wikimedia Suomi. Osallistujat voivat esimerkiksi tehdä aikamatkan suomalaiseen historiaan joko Signe Branderin jalanjäljissä tai vaikkapa Säkylän paikallishistoriaan, sukeltaa valokuvataiteen historiaan, tehdä itse ennen ja nyt -valokuvapareja, tutkia miten kulttuuri on muokannut ympäristöämme tai vaikkapa luoda ääniteoksen Sibeliuksen inspiroimana. Osallistujien käytössä on myös arkistojen, kirjastojen ja museoiden aineistoja yhteen kokoava Finna.fi-palvelu. Finna-rajapinnan kautta kuka tahansa saa käyttöönsä yli 13 miljoonan aineiston kuvailutiedot esimerkiksi uusien verkkopalveluiden kehittämistä varten. Finna.fi-palvelussa on haettavissa myös yli 450 000 avoimesti lisensoitua suomalaista kulttuuriperintöä edustavaa kuvaa. Toinen avoimen tiedon yhteistyökumppani on HRI – Helsinki Region Infoshare -palvelu, joka kokoaa yhteen pääkaupunkiseudun avointa dataa ja sen avulla toteutettuja sovelluksia. Lisäksi Gallen-Kallelan Museo, Mannerheim-museo, Kansallismuseo, Museovirasto ja Musiikkiarkisto tarjoavat avoimia aineistojaan kaikkien hyödynnettäväksi. Viikonlopun työskentelyn tuloksia esitellään Helsingin kaunpunginmuseolla sunnuntaina 7.10. klo 15 alkaen. Esittelytilaisuus on avoin kaikille kiinnostuneille. Tapahtuman yhteistyökumppaneita ovat hävikkiruokaravintola Loop, Helsingin Sanomain Säätiö, CoolHead Brew, Misc Management ja Wide -hackathon. Hanke on saanut rahoitusta Museoviraston avustuksista museoiden innovatiivisiin hankkeisiin. Lisätietoja http://hack4.fi PS. Mikäli innostuit hackathon-työskentelystä, voit osallistua myös Kansalliskirjaston, Helsingin yliopiston tietotekniikkakeskuksen sekä CSC:n järjestämään Wide-hackathoniin 26.–28.10. ORGANISERS COLLABORATORS SUPPORTERS The post Avoimet kulttuuriaineistot käyttöön kulttuurihackathonissa! appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Participatory Smart Environment Lab: Avoin tekninen ilmanlaatusensorityöpaja

- August 28, 2018 in Open Science, Working Group Meetup

Melutaanko kadullasi usein öisin?
Kulkeutuuko naapuriparvekkeen tupakoijan tuottama savu sisälle?
Erottaako kotona lähialueella olevalla festivaalilla soitettavat kappaleet?
Tuntuuko siltä, että ilma sisällä tuntuu raskaalta sen joulukynttilöiden polttamisen jälkeen? Jokainen on kokenut omassa elinympäristössään häiritseviä tekijöitä, mutta niiden laajuutta voi olla vaikea hahmottaa ja viestiä pelkästään omien kokemusten perusteella. Erinäisten ilmastoa ja ympäristöä mittaavien IoT-sensorien hinnat ovat pudonneet siinä määrin, että ei maksa kovinkaan paljoa (kokoonpanosta riippuen halvimmillaan n. 25-50e) istuttaa niitä omaan elinympäristöön. Kun sensorit tallentavat säännöllisesti tietoa elinympäristöistämme, voimme käyttää tuotettua tietoa paitsi omaan, mutta myös yhteiseen käyttöön. Open Knowledge Finlandin, Forum Virium Helsingin, Mehackitin ja XAMKin asiantuntijoista koostuva ryhmä järjestää to 27.9. klo 11:00-15:30 Maria 01:ssä työpajan, jonka tarkoituksena on tutkia yhdessä, että mitä vaatisi, että jonkinlaiset ilmastosensorit olisivat helposti otettavissa käyttöön, ja miten niiden tuottamasta tiedosta voisi saada helposti informaatiota paitsi oman, mutta myös jaetun elinympäristön hahmottamiseen. Työpajaa varten on käytettävissä tarvikkeet noin 6-8 laitteen rakentamiseen. Mukaan voi tulla omien tai aiemmin hankittujen laitteiden kanssa. Tilaan sopii noin 20 henkilöä. Ilmoittaudu tapahtumaan Facebookissa: https://www.facebook.com/events/484874521998267/ Kenelle tämä työpaja on? Työpajaan toivotaan IoT-sensorien asiantuntijoita, ilmanlaatua/ympäristöä koskevien mittausten asiantuntijoita, tiedon visualisoijia jne. Tämä työpaja on luonteeltaan tekninen ja osallistujilta toivotaan olla vahvaa osaamista joistain näistä alueista:
  • elektroniikka
  • mikrokontrollerit
  • sensorit (etenkin ilmanlaatu)
  • verkkotekniikat
  • kerätyn datan tallennus taustajärjestelmään
  • ymmärrys ilmanlaadun mittaamisesta, VOCeista, saasteista, kaasuista, pienhiukkaista ja edellisten merkittävyydestä ihmisille ja ympäristölle
Jos aihepiirin edistäminen tai seuraaminen kiinnostaa… Kannattaa liittyä kaikille avoimeen Participatory Smart Environment Lab Facebook-ryhmään: https://www.facebook.com/groups/206606553247690/ The post Participatory Smart Environment Lab: Avoin tekninen ilmanlaatusensorityöpaja appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Participatory Smart Environment Lab: Avoin tekninen ilmanlaatusensorityöpaja

- August 28, 2018 in Open Science, Working Group Meetup

Melutaanko kadullasi usein öisin?
Kulkeutuuko naapuriparvekkeen tupakoijan tuottama savu sisälle?
Erottaako kotona lähialueella olevalla festivaalilla soitettavat kappaleet?
Tuntuuko siltä, että ilma sisällä tuntuu raskaalta sen joulukynttilöiden polttamisen jälkeen? Jokainen on kokenut omassa elinympäristössään häiritseviä tekijöitä, mutta niiden laajuutta voi olla vaikea hahmottaa ja viestiä pelkästään omien kokemusten perusteella. Erinäisten ilmastoa ja ympäristöä mittaavien IoT-sensorien hinnat ovat pudonneet siinä määrin, että ei maksa kovinkaan paljoa (kokoonpanosta riippuen halvimmillaan n. 25-50e) istuttaa niitä omaan elinympäristöön. Kun sensorit tallentavat säännöllisesti tietoa elinympäristöistämme, voimme käyttää tuotettua tietoa paitsi omaan, mutta myös yhteiseen käyttöön. Open Knowledge Finlandin, Forum Virium Helsingin, Mehackitin ja XAMKin asiantuntijoista koostuva ryhmä järjestää to 27.9. klo 11:00-15:30 Maria 01:ssä työpajan, jonka tarkoituksena on tutkia yhdessä, että mitä vaatisi, että jonkinlaiset ilmastosensorit olisivat helposti otettavissa käyttöön, ja miten niiden tuottamasta tiedosta voisi saada helposti informaatiota paitsi oman, mutta myös jaetun elinympäristön hahmottamiseen. Työpajaa varten on käytettävissä tarvikkeet noin 6-8 laitteen rakentamiseen. Mukaan voi tulla omien tai aiemmin hankittujen laitteiden kanssa. Tilaan sopii noin 20 henkilöä. Ilmoittaudu tapahtumaan Facebookissa: https://www.facebook.com/events/484874521998267/ Kenelle tämä työpaja on? Työpajaan toivotaan IoT-sensorien asiantuntijoita, ilmanlaatua/ympäristöä koskevien mittausten asiantuntijoita, tiedon visualisoijia jne. Tämä työpaja on luonteeltaan tekninen ja osallistujilta toivotaan olla vahvaa osaamista joistain näistä alueista:
  • elektroniikka
  • mikrokontrollerit
  • sensorit (etenkin ilmanlaatu)
  • verkkotekniikat
  • kerätyn datan tallennus taustajärjestelmään
  • ymmärrys ilmanlaadun mittaamisesta, VOCeista, saasteista, kaasuista, pienhiukkaista ja edellisten merkittävyydestä ihmisille ja ympäristölle
Jos aihepiirin edistäminen tai seuraaminen kiinnostaa… Kannattaa liittyä kaikille avoimeen Participatory Smart Environment Lab Facebook-ryhmään: https://www.facebook.com/groups/206606553247690/ The post Participatory Smart Environment Lab: Avoin tekninen ilmanlaatusensorityöpaja appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Collective Intelligence 2018: From Open Knowledge and Network Organizations to Technology-enabled Intelligence

- July 11, 2018 in blog, projects, ResponsiveOrg Finland

This article is reposted here from the ResponsiveOrg Finland blog on Medium. I attended the Collective Intelligence 2018 conference was organized 7–8.7.2018 at the University of Zurich, the university where Albert Einstein received his PhD. Most of the participants of the Collective Intelligence 2018 conference were academics and the presentations reflected this but there were a few gems in there that I’d like to elaborate on. What is Collective Intelligence? Collective Intelligence is the promise of intelligence that can exceed the intelligence created at individual, team and organizational levels. It’s a multidisciplinary approach still in its infancy that builds upon better social practices and/or current and emerging combinations of technologies allow us to transcend our limited perspectives and the biases related to them and bundle together the efforts of as many people that we can get to participate in a purposeful manner by means of organizing as a network. Collective Intelligence is both an applied and scientific field. In terms of applied collective intelligence, Geoff Mulgan, the CEO of UK-based Nesta, author of the book Big Mind — How Collective Intelligence Can Change Our World, mentions Wikipedia and Waze as examples. Wikipedia has become the largest encyclopedia ever by means of building a digital platform and having mostly volunteers governing, moderating and editing it. Waze is a route-mapping application that combines the aggregated GPS sensor data of its users to provide route information that can take real-time traffic information into account when suggesting routes. These are examples of technology-enabled Collective Intelligence. Picture source: Collective Intelligence/Wikipedia Social processes of creating information and enabling action are also very difficult when agreement and certainty falter. When this happens, you know you are dealing with a complex topic and that is ambiguous, has many perspectives and local optimum answer to it. In facilitation, this area is called “the Groan Zone” because of the feelings that can and often do arise in it. The processes by which a map of the domain, task or mission in question can be developed socially are another form of Collective Intelligence. In addition to technologies (software-hardware), social groups, forms of data and knowledge are also key enablers of Collective Intelligence. For us Open Knowledge Finland folks, this area is a given of course. Patrick Meier and Drone Video Aid for Disaster Areas The first keynote from Patrick Meier of WeRobotics was mindblowing. Patrick is part of the Digital Humanitarians Network which seeks to promote the use of technology in disaster areas. Patrick’s company’s focus is in drone-assisted aid. Some examples of his projects include:
  1. Founding and facilitating the work of local drone “Flying Labs” in disaster and potential disaster areas:
Because disaster areas require a lot of effort, aid workers are working 20 hour days in situations of crisis. One form of aid is to evaluate where aid is needed and this is done by exploring villages and cities for damaged buildings. This has traditionally been done by sending people to the places and have them evaluate the situations. Patrick Meier’s drones have been used to make this process faster by recording videos of the damaged areas. However because of the dire situation in the crisis areas, evaluation of drone footage was not a priority to air workers. However, by the help of the Digital Humanitarians Network, it is possible to crowdsource the online evaluations of damage based on the drone footage. This, in itself is a great example of Collective Intelligence. The Digital Humanitarians Network is going even further. Because evaluations are being done online, it is possible to use the human-generated evaluation data to train Machine Learning algorithms that might help make the evaluations even faster in the future.
  1. Using AI to augment human observations and scale observation making:
I suggest looking into Patrick’s work, there’s some really inspiring stuff there! Follow Patrick Meier on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PatrickMeier WeRobotics company: https://werobotics.org/ The Digital Humanitarians book: http://digital-humanitarians.com/ Lucy Fortson and Machine Learning for Citizen Science Another intriguing talk at the conference came from Lucy Fortson who is working for Zooniverse, an online platform by which people can participate in making classifications that assist scientific projects. Examples of Zooniverse projects include Galaxy Zoo, a project for classifying distant galaxies based on astronomical photo and Shakespeare’s World, in which voluteers can help transcribe writings from Shakespeare’s time to help understand history better. Zooniverse is an awesome platform with over 40 million classifications done by 150 000 volunteers. As its goal is to assist science the projects hosted on Zooniverse have produced countless scientific articles, new scientific findings and also allowed some of the volunteers to participate in writing the articles. To further help with the Citizen Science assisted research done on their platform, Zooniverse is also exploring the combination of users and Machine Learning to help create observations that are both precise (human) and broad (AI) to expedite the research projects. Rosy Mondardini, Citizen Science and Sustainable Development Goals Rosy Mondardini, leader of the Citizen Science Center at the University of Zurich, had an interesting short talk during a panel on Crowdsourcing and Crowd-Driven Innovation about how they are promoting the use of Citizen Science to measure Sustainable Development Goals. For those not familiar, Sustainable Development Goals are UN’s call to action “to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all that could be achieved in 15 years if all sectors of society would collaborate around them. According to Rosy Mondardini, there is insufficient data to see progress in the Sustainable Development goals and this is one of the areas of opportunity where Citizen Science and crowd-driven coordination might be of assistance. For me, this is an interesting concept in terms enabling future forms of participation in cities. Traditionally data regarding cities has been expert-generated but what if Citizens also had the ability to generate both hard sensor data and soft experiental data about their lived environments to assist in sensemaking and participating in making cities based on their own experiences? Collective Intelligence 2018: Summa Summarum Collective Intelligence is definitely one of those emergent topics that is on the rise even though it seems like the concept is not very well known here in Finland even though we are doing many cool things in the areas of Citizen Science and Open Collaboration. I have not heard of many instances from Finland where technology has been used to augment people in service of large social issues quite yet. Like I mentioned earlier, the Collective Intelligence 2018 conference, even though it had the goal of bringing together practitioners, companies and academics, was not able to cater to the goal and focused mostly on academic approaches. Another issue I had with the conference was the the high focus on technology-enabled collaboration whereas the human-centered approaches having to do with facilitation of groups was mostly missing. Being a person of multiple interests, what I really enjoyed in the conference, was becoming influenced by thinking that is somewhat different than my own. Even though I’m not very deep into Collective Intelligence quite yet, I believe I will be considering options more from the angle of enabling technology-assisted open crowds in my future thinking. In regards to the relationship between what we call Responsive Organizations and Collective Intelligence, I believe we’re in the same ballpark. As Collective Intelligence is the emergent property of the collaboration between groups, technologies and data/knowledge, it shares the same resources as Responsive Organizations. Collective Intelligence, Social Technologies and Network Organizations are heavily related and enablers of each other. Whereas Responsive Organizations use Social Technologies (essentially practices and technologies that allow us to collaborate better and at scale) to organize as scalable Networks or Network Organizations for purposeful action by means of broad knowledge creation, Collective Intelligence is the knowledge that is created using Networks and Social Technologies. They are definitely related concepts. Collective Intelligence is also close to what we call Open Knowledge as the openness of knowledge is an enabler of its purposeful transformation into Collective Intelligence. We at Open Knowledge Finland and ResponsiveOrg Finland will definitely be following the Collective Intelligence scene and hope to promote its practical advancements for the development of the Finnish society.
ResponsiveOrg Finland invites you to explore and promote practices by which teams and organizations can be better at responsiveness to changes, people, futures and operating as a network. Join in: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ResponsiveOrgFI/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ResponsiveOrgFI
WWW: http://responsiveorg.fi
Contact: @mikaelseppala
@OKFFI The post Collective Intelligence 2018: From Open Knowledge and Network Organizations to Technology-enabled Intelligence appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Collective Intelligence 2018: From Open Knowledge and Network Organizations to Technology-enabled Intelligence

- July 11, 2018 in blog, projects, ResponsiveOrg Finland

This article is reposted here from the ResponsiveOrg Finland blog on Medium. I attended the Collective Intelligence 2018 conference was organized 7–8.7.2018 at the University of Zurich, the university where Albert Einstein received his PhD. Most of the participants of the Collective Intelligence 2018 conference were academics and the presentations reflected this but there were a few gems in there that I’d like to elaborate on. What is Collective Intelligence? Collective Intelligence is the promise of intelligence that can exceed the intelligence created at individual, team and organizational levels. It’s a multidisciplinary approach still in its infancy that builds upon better social practices and/or current and emerging combinations of technologies allow us to transcend our limited perspectives and the biases related to them and bundle together the efforts of as many people that we can get to participate in a purposeful manner by means of organizing as a network. Collective Intelligence is both an applied and scientific field. In terms of applied collective intelligence, Geoff Mulgan, the CEO of UK-based Nesta, author of the book Big Mind — How Collective Intelligence Can Change Our World, mentions Wikipedia and Waze as examples. Wikipedia has become the largest encyclopedia ever by means of building a digital platform and having mostly volunteers governing, moderating and editing it. Waze is a route-mapping application that combines the aggregated GPS sensor data of its users to provide route information that can take real-time traffic information into account when suggesting routes. These are examples of technology-enabled Collective Intelligence. Picture source: Collective Intelligence/Wikipedia Social processes of creating information and enabling action are also very difficult when agreement and certainty falter. When this happens, you know you are dealing with a complex topic and that is ambiguous, has many perspectives and local optimum answer to it. In facilitation, this area is called “the Groan Zone” because of the feelings that can and often do arise in it. The processes by which a map of the domain, task or mission in question can be developed socially are another form of Collective Intelligence. In addition to technologies (software-hardware), social groups, forms of data and knowledge are also key enablers of Collective Intelligence. For us Open Knowledge Finland folks, this area is a given of course. Patrick Meier and Drone Video Aid for Disaster Areas The first keynote from Patrick Meier of WeRobotics was mindblowing. Patrick is part of the Digital Humanitarians Network which seeks to promote the use of technology in disaster areas. Patrick’s company’s focus is in drone-assisted aid. Some examples of his projects include:
  1. Founding and facilitating the work of local drone “Flying Labs” in disaster and potential disaster areas:
Because disaster areas require a lot of effort, aid workers are working 20 hour days in situations of crisis. One form of aid is to evaluate where aid is needed and this is done by exploring villages and cities for damaged buildings. This has traditionally been done by sending people to the places and have them evaluate the situations. Patrick Meier’s drones have been used to make this process faster by recording videos of the damaged areas. However because of the dire situation in the crisis areas, evaluation of drone footage was not a priority to air workers. However, by the help of the Digital Humanitarians Network, it is possible to crowdsource the online evaluations of damage based on the drone footage. This, in itself is a great example of Collective Intelligence. The Digital Humanitarians Network is going even further. Because evaluations are being done online, it is possible to use the human-generated evaluation data to train Machine Learning algorithms that might help make the evaluations even faster in the future.
  1. Using AI to augment human observations and scale observation making:
I suggest looking into Patrick’s work, there’s some really inspiring stuff there! Follow Patrick Meier on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PatrickMeier WeRobotics company: https://werobotics.org/ The Digital Humanitarians book: http://digital-humanitarians.com/ Lucy Fortson and Machine Learning for Citizen Science Another intriguing talk at the conference came from Lucy Fortson who is working for Zooniverse, an online platform by which people can participate in making classifications that assist scientific projects. Examples of Zooniverse projects include Galaxy Zoo, a project for classifying distant galaxies based on astronomical photo and Shakespeare’s World, in which voluteers can help transcribe writings from Shakespeare’s time to help understand history better. Zooniverse is an awesome platform with over 40 million classifications done by 150 000 volunteers. As its goal is to assist science the projects hosted on Zooniverse have produced countless scientific articles, new scientific findings and also allowed some of the volunteers to participate in writing the articles. To further help with the Citizen Science assisted research done on their platform, Zooniverse is also exploring the combination of users and Machine Learning to help create observations that are both precise (human) and broad (AI) to expedite the research projects. Rosy Mondardini, Citizen Science and Sustainable Development Goals Rosy Mondardini, leader of the Citizen Science Center at the University of Zurich, had an interesting short talk during a panel on Crowdsourcing and Crowd-Driven Innovation about how they are promoting the use of Citizen Science to measure Sustainable Development Goals. For those not familiar, Sustainable Development Goals are UN’s call to action “to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all that could be achieved in 15 years if all sectors of society would collaborate around them. According to Rosy Mondardini, there is insufficient data to see progress in the Sustainable Development goals and this is one of the areas of opportunity where Citizen Science and crowd-driven coordination might be of assistance. For me, this is an interesting concept in terms enabling future forms of participation in cities. Traditionally data regarding cities has been expert-generated but what if Citizens also had the ability to generate both hard sensor data and soft experiental data about their lived environments to assist in sensemaking and participating in making cities based on their own experiences? Collective Intelligence 2018: Summa Summarum Collective Intelligence is definitely one of those emergent topics that is on the rise even though it seems like the concept is not very well known here in Finland even though we are doing many cool things in the areas of Citizen Science and Open Collaboration. I have not heard of many instances from Finland where technology has been used to augment people in service of large social issues quite yet. Like I mentioned earlier, the Collective Intelligence 2018 conference, even though it had the goal of bringing together practitioners, companies and academics, was not able to cater to the goal and focused mostly on academic approaches. Another issue I had with the conference was the the high focus on technology-enabled collaboration whereas the human-centered approaches having to do with facilitation of groups was mostly missing. Being a person of multiple interests, what I really enjoyed in the conference, was becoming influenced by thinking that is somewhat different than my own. Even though I’m not very deep into Collective Intelligence quite yet, I believe I will be considering options more from the angle of enabling technology-assisted open crowds in my future thinking. In regards to the relationship between what we call Responsive Organizations and Collective Intelligence, I believe we’re in the same ballpark. As Collective Intelligence is the emergent property of the collaboration between groups, technologies and data/knowledge, it shares the same resources as Responsive Organizations. Collective Intelligence, Social Technologies and Network Organizations are heavily related and enablers of each other. Whereas Responsive Organizations use Social Technologies (essentially practices and technologies that allow us to collaborate better and at scale) to organize as scalable Networks or Network Organizations for purposeful action by means of broad knowledge creation, Collective Intelligence is the knowledge that is created using Networks and Social Technologies. They are definitely related concepts. Collective Intelligence is also close to what we call Open Knowledge as the openness of knowledge is an enabler of its purposeful transformation into Collective Intelligence. We at Open Knowledge Finland and ResponsiveOrg Finland will definitely be following the Collective Intelligence scene and hope to promote its practical advancements for the development of the Finnish society.
ResponsiveOrg Finland invites you to explore and promote practices by which teams and organizations can be better at responsiveness to changes, people, futures and operating as a network. Join in: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ResponsiveOrgFI/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ResponsiveOrgFI
WWW: http://responsiveorg.fi
Contact: @mikaelseppala
@OKFFI The post Collective Intelligence 2018: From Open Knowledge and Network Organizations to Technology-enabled Intelligence appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

ResponsiveOrg Finland – verkostoajan organisaatioita ja työtä uudistamaan

- July 4, 2017 in Uncategorized

“Kaikki on ja olemme kaikki verkostoituneita. Jännite ennustettavuuteen optimoitujen organisaatioiden ja ennakoimattoman maailman välillä on saavuttanut hajoamispisteen. Tarvitsemme uuden lähestymistavan.” ResponsiveOrg manifesti
Tuntuuko sinustakin siltä, ettei organisaatiossasi ja työssäsi hyödynnetä verkostoajan mahdollisuuksia? ResponsiveOrg Finland on avoimesti toimiva, oppiva ja tekevä verkosto, joka pyrkii kiihdyttämään työn ja organisoitumisen uudistumista. Toimimme paikallisena hubina globaalisti toimivalle ResponsiveOrg-verkostolle. Kutsumme luomaan ja edistämään toimintatapoja, joiden avulla organisaatiot voivat kehittää responsiivisuuttaan muutoksille, ihmisille, tulevaisuuksille ja verkosto-organisoitumiselle. Yksittäisten, ajassa elävien organisoitumisen ja työtä koskevien lähestymistapojen sijaan meidän kannattaa siirtää fokus yhdistävään tekijään: verkostoaikaan ja sen mahdollisuuksiin. Verkostoajan organisoitumiseen viitataankin monilla käsitteillä: puhutaan muun muassa kompleksisuudesta, leanista, agilesta, palvelumuotoilusta, tealista ja systeemi- sekä verkostoajattelusta. Kun kaikki liittyy kaikkeen, kaipaamme koherentteja, toisiinsa liittyviä toimintatapoja, jotka yhdessä tekevät organisaatioista ja työstä verkostoitunutta. Näitä ei ole kukaan kyennyt vielä määrittelemään tyhjentävästi, ja koemme, että tässä on paikka yhteiselle oppimiselle sekä tekemiselle. Käsienheiluttelun ja ylhäältä annettujen määräysten sijaan haluamme edistää ihmislähtöisiä työtapoja, joissa yhteisöt hyödyntävät osallistuutta ja dialogia tehdessään verkostoajan organisoitumisesta ja työtavoista itselleen merkityksellisiä. Dialogia kaivataan yhtälailla meidän verkostoajan kehittäjien ja tekijöiden välillä, että voimme sanoittaa ja edistää teemoja yhdessä hyödyntäen toistemme vahvuuksia. Haluamme mahdollistaa monia näkökulmia yhteen tuovan avoimesti toimivan (Open) verkoston, jossa voi oppia ja luoda responsiivisia toimintatapoja. Yhteisön tavoitteena on olla oppimis- ja tekemisverkosto (Learn & Do Network), joka tähtää ymmärryksen lisäämiseen ja vaikuttamiseen. Teemme tätä edistämällä eteenpäinkytkentää (Feed Forward) kehittämällä avoimesti käytettävää (Commons) osaamista ja toimintatapoja, kirjoittamalla blogikirjoituksia sekä järjestämällä tapaamisia, työpajoja ja myöhemmin mahdollisesti tapahtumia tai konferensseja. ResponsiveOrg Finlandin toimintaa fasilitoi verkostoaikaan syntynyt Open Knowledge Finland ry. Yhdistyksellä on useamman vuoden kokemus muutoksen ja muutosta edistävien yhteisöjen aktioimisesta, yhteentuomisesta ja tukemisesta mm. avoimen datan, MyDatan ja avoimen yhteiskunnan saroilla. ResponsiveOrg Finland järjestää ensimmäisen verkostotapaamisensa elokuussa. Tule kuulolle ja osallistu: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ResponsiveOrgFI/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ResponsiveOrgFI
WWW: http://responsiveorg.fi Lisätietoja: @OKFFI
@mikaelseppala
@akisaariaho The post ResponsiveOrg Finland – verkostoajan organisaatioita ja työtä uudistamaan appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.