You are browsing the archive for Peter Kraker.

Visual gateways into science: Why it’s time to change the way we discover research

- November 14, 2017 in open knowledge maps, Open Science, Open Source, tools

Have you ever noticed that it is really hard to get an overview of a research field that you know nothing about? Let’s assume for a minute that a family member or a loved one of yours has fallen ill and unfortunately, the standard treatment isn’t working. Like many other people, you now want to get into the research on the illness to better understand what’s going on. You proceed to type the name of the disease into PubMed or Google Scholar – and you are confronted with thousands of results, more than you could ever read. It’s hard to determine where to start, because you don’t understand the terminology in the field, you don’t know what the main areas are, and it’s hard to identify important papers, journals, and authors just by looking at the results list. With time and patience you could probably get there. However, this is time that you do not have, because decisions need to be made. Decisions that may have grave implications for the patient. If you have ever had a similar experience, you are not alone. We are all swamped with the literature, and even experts struggle with this problem. In the Zika epidemic in 2015 for example, many people scrambled to get an overview of what was until then an obscure research topic. This included researchers, but also practitioners and public health officials. And it’s not just medicine; almost all areas of research have become so specialized that they’re almost impenetrable from the outside. But the thing is, there are many people on the outside that could benefit from scientific knowledge. Think about journalists, fact checkers, policy makers or students. They all have the same problem – they don’t have a way in. Reuse of scientific knowledge within academia is already limited, but when we’re looking at transfer to practice, the gap is even wider. Even in application-oriented disciplines, only a small percentage of research findings ever influence practice – and even if they do so, often with a considerable delay. At Open Knowledge Maps, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the visibility of scientific knowledge for science and society, it is our mission to change that. We want to provide visual gateways into research – because we think that it is important that we do not only provide access to research findings, but also to enable discoverability of scientific knowledge. At the moment, there is a missing link between accessibility and discoverability – and we want to provide that link. Imagine a world, where you can get an overview of any research field at a glance, meaning you can easily determine the main areas and relevant concepts in the field. In addition, you can instantly identify a set of papers that are relevant for your information need. We call such overviews knowledge maps. You can find an example for the field of heart diseases below. The bubbles represent the main areas and relevant papers are already attached to each of the areas. Now imagine that each of these maps is adapted to the needs of different types of users, researchers, students, journalists or patients. And not only that: they are all structured and connected and they contain annotated pathways through the literature as to what to read first, and how to proceed afterwards. This is the vision that we’ve have been working on for the past 1.5 years as a growing community of designers, developers, communicators, advisors, partners, and users. On our website, we are offering an openly accessible service, which allows you to create a knowledge map for any discipline. Users can choose between two databases: Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE) with more than 110 million scientific documents from all disciplines, and PubMed, the large biomedical database with 26 million references. We use the 100 most relevant results for a search term as reported by the respective database as a starting point for our knowledge maps. We use text similarity to create the knowledge maps. The algorithm groups those papers together that have many words in common. See below for an example map of digital education. We have received a lot of positive feedback on this service from the community. We are honored and humbled by hundreds of enthusiastic posts in blogs, and on Facebook and Twitter. The service has also been featured on the front pages of reddit and HackerNews, and recently, we won the Open Minds Award, the Austrian Open Source Award. Since the first launch of the service in May 2016, we have had more than 200,000 visits on Open Knowledge Maps. Currently, more than 20,000 users leverage Open Knowledge Maps for their research, work, and studies per month. The “Open” in Open Knowledge Maps does not only stand for open access articles – we want to go the whole way of open science and create a public good. This means that all of our software is developed open source. You can also find our development roadmap on Github and leave comments by opening an issue. The knowledge maps themselves are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license and can be freely shared and modified. We will also openly share the underlying data, for example as Linked Open Data. This way, we want to contribute to the open science ecosystem that our partners, including Open Knowledge Austria, rOpenSci, ContentMine, the Internet Archive Labs and Wikimedia are creating. Open Knowledge International has played a crucial role in incubating the idea of an open discovery platform, by way of a Panton Fellowship where the first prototype of the search service was created. Since then, the Open Knowledge Network has enthusiastically supported the project, in particular the Austrian chapter as well as Open Knowledge International, Open Knowledge Germany and other regional organisations. Members of the international Open Knowledge community have become indispensable for Open Knowledge Maps, be it as team members, advisors or active supporters. A big shout-out and thank you to you! As a next step, we want to work on structuring and connecting these maps – and we want to turn discovery into a collaborative process. Because someone has already gone that way before and they have all the overview and the insights. We want to enable people to communicate this knowledge so that we can start laying pathways through science for each other. We have created a short video to illustrate this idea:

Visual gateways into science: Why it’s time to change the way we discover research

- November 14, 2017 in open knowledge maps, Open Science, Open Source, tools

Have you ever noticed that it is really hard to get an overview of a research field that you know nothing about? Let’s assume for a minute that a family member or a loved one of yours has fallen ill and unfortunately, the standard treatment isn’t working. Like many other people, you now want to get into the research on the illness to better understand what’s going on. You proceed to type the name of the disease into PubMed or Google Scholar – and you are confronted with thousands of results, more than you could ever read. It’s hard to determine where to start, because you don’t understand the terminology in the field, you don’t know what the main areas are, and it’s hard to identify important papers, journals, and authors just by looking at the results list. With time and patience you could probably get there. However, this is time that you do not have, because decisions need to be made. Decisions that may have grave implications for the patient. If you have ever had a similar experience, you are not alone. We are all swamped with the literature, and even experts struggle with this problem. In the Zika epidemic in 2015 for example, many people scrambled to get an overview of what was until then an obscure research topic. This included researchers, but also practitioners and public health officials. And it’s not just medicine; almost all areas of research have become so specialized that they’re almost impenetrable from the outside. But the thing is, there are many people on the outside that could benefit from scientific knowledge. Think about journalists, fact checkers, policy makers or students. They all have the same problem – they don’t have a way in. Reuse of scientific knowledge within academia is already limited, but when we’re looking at transfer to practice, the gap is even wider. Even in application-oriented disciplines, only a small percentage of research findings ever influence practice – and even if they do so, often with a considerable delay. At Open Knowledge Maps, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the visibility of scientific knowledge for science and society, it is our mission to change that. We want to provide visual gateways into research – because we think that it is important that we do not only provide access to research findings, but also to enable discoverability of scientific knowledge. At the moment, there is a missing link between accessibility and discoverability – and we want to provide that link. Imagine a world, where you can get an overview of any research field at a glance, meaning you can easily determine the main areas and relevant concepts in the field. In addition, you can instantly identify a set of papers that are relevant for your information need. We call such overviews knowledge maps. You can find an example for the field of heart diseases below. The bubbles represent the main areas and relevant papers are already attached to each of the areas. Now imagine that each of these maps is adapted to the needs of different types of users, researchers, students, journalists or patients. And not only that: they are all structured and connected and they contain annotated pathways through the literature as to what to read first, and how to proceed afterwards. This is the vision that we’ve have been working on for the past 1.5 years as a growing community of designers, developers, communicators, advisors, partners, and users. On our website, we are offering an openly accessible service, which allows you to create a knowledge map for any discipline. Users can choose between two databases: Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE) with more than 110 million scientific documents from all disciplines, and PubMed, the large biomedical database with 26 million references. We use the 100 most relevant results for a search term as reported by the respective database as a starting point for our knowledge maps. We use text similarity to create the knowledge maps. The algorithm groups those papers together that have many words in common. See below for an example map of digital education. We have received a lot of positive feedback on this service from the community. We are honored and humbled by hundreds of enthusiastic posts in blogs, and on Facebook and Twitter. The service has also been featured on the front pages of reddit and HackerNews, and recently, we won the Open Minds Award, the Austrian Open Source Award. Since the first launch of the service in May 2016, we have had more than 200,000 visits on Open Knowledge Maps. Currently, more than 20,000 users leverage Open Knowledge Maps for their research, work, and studies per month. The “Open” in Open Knowledge Maps does not only stand for open access articles – we want to go the whole way of open science and create a public good. This means that all of our software is developed open source. You can also find our development roadmap on Github and leave comments by opening an issue. The knowledge maps themselves are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license and can be freely shared and modified. We will also openly share the underlying data, for example as Linked Open Data. This way, we want to contribute to the open science ecosystem that our partners, including Open Knowledge Austria, rOpenSci, ContentMine, the Internet Archive Labs and Wikimedia are creating. Open Knowledge International has played a crucial role in incubating the idea of an open discovery platform, by way of a Panton Fellowship where the first prototype of the search service was created. Since then, the Open Knowledge Network has enthusiastically supported the project, in particular the Austrian chapter as well as Open Knowledge International, Open Knowledge Germany and other regional organisations. Members of the international Open Knowledge community have become indispensable for Open Knowledge Maps, be it as team members, advisors or active supporters. A big shout-out and thank you to you! As a next step, we want to work on structuring and connecting these maps – and we want to turn discovery into a collaborative process. Because someone has already gone that way before and they have all the overview and the insights. We want to enable people to communicate this knowledge so that we can start laying pathways through science for each other. We have created a short video to illustrate this idea:

Workshop: Open Science – What’s in it for me?

- October 4, 2017 in event, Workshop

On September 20th we co-organized a workshop dedicated to the researcher’s perspective on Open Science with Bianca Kramer and Jeroen Bosman from Utrecht University.

101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication. CC BY. Source: https://innoscholcomm.silk.co/

Open Science is disrupting traditional scientific workflows. This is changing how scientists collect their data, present and share their research, publish their findings, reach out to other communities and the public and assess the impact of their work. Many things have been written about Open Science on a policy level, but this workshop it not about policies. This workshop is about Open Science and you: what’s in it for you?

At the Austrian central library for Physics more than 60 researchers from a wide range of disciplines, as well as research support managers and administrators gathered to discuss hands-on examples of Open Science workflow examples across various disciplines and to find out how they could be implemented in their daily routines.Even though there are many important differences between scientific disciplines (such as in the publication and reward system), we focused on the added value that open approaches can generate for most of the disciplines. Bianca Kramer and Jeroen Bosman took us on a path to explore a variety of Open Science tools and practices along different phases of the scientific workflow: Phase #1: Preparation, Discovery and Analysis; Phase #2: Writing and Publishing and Phase #3: Outreach and Assessment. Each individual phase was introduced, discussed and exemplified by practical use cases. This served to see where we could apply Open Science practices in your daily scientific routines, creating our own Open Science workflow. Following this, we discussed differences and similarities in such workflows for different disciplines and career stages, and the barriers and motivations that come into play. Then, Pietro Michelucci described the EyesOnALZ citizen science project, which allows thousands of volunteers to help speed up Alzheimer’s research by playing Stall Catchers, an online game where players analyze real research data using a virtual microscope. Finally, Peter Kraker from the Open Access Network Austria and Jeroen and Bianca, who are also involved with Force11 introduced the Vienna Principles and the Principles of the Scholarly Commons. The day ended in a vivid discussion how these declarations can help the adoption of Open Science practices. This workshop was organized by the Vienna Principles Working Group of the Open Access Network Austria OANA, AT2OA , Ludwig-Boltzmann Gesellschaft and Open Knowledge Austria. Workshop info and materials can be found here. Blog post by Peter Kraker @PeterKraker and Katja Mayer @katja_mat

Workshop: Open Science – What’s in it for me?

- September 4, 2017 in event, Workshop

Save the date: Open Science Workshop with Bianca Kramer and Jeroen Bosman

- July 17, 2017 in event, HandsOn, Open Science, Workshop

We would like to give you a brief heads-up for our upcoming Open Science workshop on 20 September 2017 in Vienna*. Please register here. Open Science – What’s in it for me? Bianca Kramer and Jeroen Bosman from Utrecht University will guide us through the wonders of Open Science for this 1-day workshop. What?
The aim of the workshop is to provide researchers and administrators with hands-on examples of Open Science tools and workflow examples across various disciplines. We do not aim to discuss Open Science on a policy level, but rather want to help you discover what’s out there and how researchers can implement Open Science into their daily scientific routines. Together with the audience, we will explore open practices with respect to differences between scientific disciplines and show the added value that open approaches can generate for the researchers themselves. Who?
Researchers from all disciplines, research support managers and administrators are invited When?
Wednesday, 20 September 2017, 9:00 to 17:00 Where?
*Detailed information on the location and event schedule will be provided in upcoming weeks. Don’t miss out on this event and register here. This workshop is organized by the Vienna Principles Working Group of the Open Access Network Austria, Austrian Transition to Open Access (AT2OA), Ludwig-Boltzmann Gesellschaft and Open Knowledge Austria.

101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication. CC BY. Source: https://innoscholcomm.silk.co/

Save the date: Open Science Workshop with Bianca Kramer and Jeroen Bosman

- July 17, 2017 in event, HandsOn, Open Science, Workshop

We would like to give you a brief heads-up for our upcoming Open Science workshop on 20 September 2017 in Vienna*. Please register here. Open Science – What’s in it for me? Bianca Kramer and Jeroen Bosman from Utrecht University will guide us through the wonders of Open Science for this 1-day workshop. What?
The aim of the workshop is to provide researchers and administrators with hands-on examples of Open Science tools and workflow examples across various disciplines. We do not aim to discuss Open Science on a policy level, but rather want to help you discover what’s out there and how researchers can implement Open Science into their daily scientific routines. Together with the audience, we will explore open practices with respect to differences between scientific disciplines and show the added value that open approaches can generate for the researchers themselves. Who?
Researchers from all disciplines, research support managers and administrators are invited When?
Wednesday, 20 September 2017, 9:00 to 17:00 Where?
*Detailed information on the location and event schedule will be provided in upcoming weeks. Don’t miss out on this event and register here. This workshop is organized by the Vienna Principles Working Group of the Open Access Network Austria, Austrian Transition to Open Access (AT2OA), Ludwig-Boltzmann Gesellschaft and Open Knowledge Austria.

101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication. CC BY. Source: https://innoscholcomm.silk.co/

Open Science Meetup: I didn’t know I could know so much!

- September 21, 2016 in event, Meetup, Open Science

Save the Date: Nächstes Open Science Meetup am Montag, den 24.10. um 18:00 Uhr in Wien English version see below! Auch in diesem Jahr läuten wir die internationale Open Access Week (#oaweek) mit einem Meetup der Open Science Arbeitsgruppe ein. Dabei wird sich alles um die offene Literatursuche drehen – das bedeutet Suche in offenen Quellen und mit offenen Tools. Ob ForscherIn, StudentIn, JournalistIn oder BibliothekarIn: häufig tritt der Fall auf, dass man sich schnell einen Überblick über ein wissenschaftliches Gebiet schaffen muss. Bisher ein mühsames Unterfangen; insbesondere weil man auf viele Quellen nicht zugreifen kann und die klassischen Recherche-Tools über grundlegende Suchfunktionen hinaus wenig bieten. by Maxi Schramm In diesem Meetup wollen wir diskutieren, wie die Literaturrecherche funktionieren sollte und welche Potenziale in der zunehmenden Verfügbarkeit offener Inhalte liegen. Konkret werden wir gemeinsam das visuelle Interface Open Knowledge Maps unter die Lupe nehmen und Strategien für effektivere Recherche aufzeigen. Mehr Infos inkl. der genauen Location werden wir in Kürze bekannt geben. Wir freuen uns auf euch!
Save the Date: Next Open Science Meetup on Monday, October 24 at 18:00 Uhr in Vienna As usual, we are kicking-off Open Access Week (#oaweek) with a meetup of the Open Science Working Group. This year’s event will be all about open science literature research – that is, literature research in open repositories and with open tools. Whether you are a student, a researcher, a journalist or a librarian, you know this situation: you need to get an overview of an unknown field of research – and you need it fast. Traditionally, this has been a daunting task; especially since many sources cannot be accessed and most tools do not offer more than basic search functionality. In this meetup, we will discuss how literature research should work, and what the potentials of open content are. Specifically, we are going to take a closer look at Open Knowledge Maps, a visual interface to scientific knowledge and we will discuss strategies for a more effective literature research. More information, including the exact location of the meetup is coming soon. We are looking foward to seeing you!

Open Science Meetup: I didn’t know I could know so much!

- September 21, 2016 in Meetup, Open Science

English version see below! Open Knowledge Austria und ÖAW BAS:IS (Bibliothek, Archiv, Sammlungen: Information & Service) laden zum Open Science Meetup unter folgendem Motto ein: “I didn’t know I could know so much – Literatursuche in offenen Quellen und mit offenen Tools” Zeit: Montag, den 24.10., um 18:00 Uhr
Ort: Clubraum der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften (ÖAW), Dr.-Ignaz-Seipel Platz 2, 1010 Wien
RSVP Ob ForscherIn, StudentIn, JournalistIn oder BibliothekarIn: häufig tritt der Fall auf, dass man sich einen Überblick über ein wissenschaftliches Gebiet verschaffen muss – und das oft in kürzester Zeit. Bisher ein mühsames Unterfangen, insbesondere weil man auf viele Quellen nicht zugreifen kann und die klassischen Recherche-Tools über grundlegende Suchfunktionen hinaus wenig bieten. by Maxi Schramm Zum Start der internationalen Open Access Week (#oaweek) wollen wir diskutieren, wie die Literaturrecherche im Zeitalter von Open Science aussehen sollte und welche Potenziale in der zunehmenden Verfügbarkeit offener Inhalte liegen. Konkret werden wir gemeinsam das visuelle Interface Open Knowledge Maps unter die Lupe nehmen und Strategien für effektivere Recherche aufzeigen. Die Teilnahme an der Veranstaltung ist kostenlos. Bitte um Voranmeldung auf meetup.com oder unter openscience@okfn.at. Wir freuen uns auf eine rege Diskussion!
Open Knowledge Austria and ÖAW BAS:IS (Library, Archive, Collections: Information & Service) kindly invite you to an open science meetup with the following topic: “I didn’t know I could know so much – Literature Research in Open Repositories and with Open Tools” Date: Monday, October 24, at 18:00
Location: Clubraum of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW), Dr.-Ignaz-Seipel Platz 2, 1010 Wien Whether you are a student, a researcher, a journalist or a librarian, you are familiar with this situation: you need to get an overview of an unknown field of research – and you need it fast. Traditionally, this has been a daunting task; especially since many sources cannot be accessed and most tools do not offer more than basic search functionality. At the beginning of the international Open Access Week (#oaweek), we will discuss how literature research should work, and what the potentials of open content are. Specifically, we are going to take a closer look at Open Knowledge Maps, a visual interface to scientific knowledge, and we will discuss strategies for a more effective literature research. Participation is free of charge. Please RSVP on meetup.com or via openscience@okfn.at. We are looking forward to a fruitful discussion! Open Knowledge Österreich MeetUp

YEAR Conference 2015: Your chance to win 5000 Euros for your Open Science project idea

- February 27, 2015 in Announcements, Featured

Acknowledgements: Thanks to the YEAR Board for contributing to this blog post! Are you a young researcher with an Open Science project idea? Here’s a chance to win 5000 Euros to make it happen: The Young European Associated Researchers (YEAR) Network organises its Annual Conference on 11-12 May 2015 at VTT in Helsinki/Espoo (Finland) with a focus on Open Science. Registration for the conference is now open. The YEAR Annual Conference is a two-day event for young researchers, which offers a platform for exchange and training focused on key aspects of EU projects. This event provides young researchers with a solid basis for successful integrations of both open access and open research data concepts in Horizon 2020 projects as well as current research workflows. Annual-Conference-2015-small“Sharing is caring”! This is probably a good way to describe what Open Science really means: a new approach to science to share ideas, research results, research data, and publications with the rest of the world, through the newly available network technologies. Open science approaches are rather new concepts that many researchers are not familiar with as of yet. Young researchers in particular struggle when being confronted with open access or open research data and issues related to it. This fact is reinforced by survey recently conducted by YEAR, according to which many of the surveyed young researchers are inexperienced with open science and unsure about its implications. According to a majority of about 80% of the survey participants one of the most effective channels for awareness-raising of Open Science is its integration in research training. The aim of this training is to respond to this demand and to provide young researchers with a solid basis for successfully implementing both open access and open research data concepts in H2020 projects and to highlight ways of integrating them into current research workflows. Conference Day 1: invited international experts will introduce strategies for fulfilling open access requirements in H2020 projects and Open Data Pilots. The goal of Day 1 is to give the attendees the necessary background information and useful tools for publishing open access or open research data. Conference Day 2: the young researchers are invited to come with a project idea relying on, or promoting open research data/open science aspects. They will be challenged to defend their idea and to work it out with the other young researchers to take a chance to win one of the two YEAR Awards. The goal is for the young researchers to gain hands-on experience on developing strong project ideas as well as to find other potential project partners. Confirmed speakers and trainers: Jean-Claude Burgelman (European Commission, DG Research and Innovation), Petr Knoth (The Open University, UK), Jenny Molloy (OKFN, University of Oxford, UK), Peter Kraker (KNOW Center, AT) YEAR Awards: the two most outstanding project ideas defended and developed during the Conference Day 2 will be awarded. The YEAR Awards consist of a European Project Management training course and 5000 euros each to further develop the project ideas. Please submit your project idea for the YEAR Annual Conference 2015 by Thursday 2 April 2015. The conference is supported by the EU project FOSTER and is organised by YEAR in cooperation with VTT, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, KNOW Center Graz, and SINTEF. The Open Knowledge Foundation is a dissemination partner. Conference links: http://www.year-network.com/homepage/year-annual-conference-2015 https://www.fosteropenscience.eu/event/year-annual-conference-2015-open-science-horizon-2020

Panton Fellowship Wrap Up

- October 9, 2014 in Panton Fellowships

On stage at the Open Science Panel Vienna (Photo by FWF/APA-Fotoservice/Thomas Preiss)

On stage at the Open Science Panel Vienna (Photo by FWF/APA-Fotoservice/Thomas Preiss)

It’s hard to believe that it has been over a year since Peter Murray-Rust announced the new Panton fellows at OKCon 2013. I am immensly proud that I was one of the 2013/14 Panton Fellows and the first non UK-based fellow. In this post, I will recap my activities during the last year and give an outlook of things to come after the end of the fellowship. At the end of the post, you can find all outputs of my fellowship at a glance. My fellowship had two focal points: the work on open and transparent altmetrics and the promotion of open science in Austria and beyond.

Open and transparent altmetrics

The blog post entitled “All metrics are wrong, but some are useful” sums up my views on (alt)metrics: I argue that no single number can determine the worth of an article, a journal, or a researcher. Instead, we have to find those numbers that give us a good picture of the many facets of these entities and put them into context. Openness and transparency are two necessary properties of such an (alt)metrics system, as this is the only sustainable way to uncover inherent biases and to detect attempts of gaming. In my comment to the NISO whitepaper on altmetrics standards, I therefore maintained that openness and transparency should be strongly considered for altmetrics standards. In another post on “Open and transparent altmetrics for discovery”, I laid out that altmetrics have a largely untapped potential for visualizaton and discovery that goes beyond rankings of top papers and researchers. In order to help uncover this potential, I released the open source visualization Head Start that I developed as part of my PhD project. Head Start gives scholars an overview of a research field based on relational information derived from altmetrics. In two blog posts, “New version of open source visualization Head Start released” and “What’s new in Head Start?” I chronicled the development of a server component, the introdcution of the timeline visualization created by Philipp Weißensteiner, and the integration of Head Start with Conference Navigator 3, a nifty conference scheduling system. With Chris Kittel and Fabian Dablander, I took first steps towards automatic visualizations of PLOS papers. Recently, Head Start also became part of the Open Knowledge Labs. If you are interested in contributing to the project, please get in touch with me, or have a look at the open feature requests.
Evolution of the UMAP conference visualized in Head Start. More information in  Kraker, P., Weißensteiner, P., & Brusilovsky, P. (2014). Altmetrics-based Visualizations Depicting the Evolution of a Knowledge Domain 19th International Conference on Science and Technology Indicators (STI 2014), 330-333.

Evolution of the UMAP conference visualized in Head Start. More information in Kraker, P., Weißensteiner, P., & Brusilovsky, P. (2014). Altmetrics-based Visualizations Depicting the Evolution of a Knowledge Domain 19th International Conference on Science and Technology Indicators (STI 2014), 330-333.

Promotion of open science and open data

Regarding the promotion of open science, I teamed up with Stefan Kasberger and Chris Kittel of openscienceasap.org and the Austrian chapter of Open Knowledge for a series of events that were intended to generate more awareness in the local community. In October 2013, I was a panelist at the openscienceASAP kick-off event at University of Graz entitled “The Changing Face of Science: Is Open Science the Future?”. In December, I helped organizing an OKFN Open Science Meetup in Vienna on altmetrics. I also gave an introductory talk on this occasion that got more than 1000 views on Slideshare. In February 2014, I was interviewed for the openscienceASAP podcast on my Panton Fellowship and the need for an inclusive approach to open science. In June, Panton Fellowship mentors Peter Murray-Rust and Michelle Brook visited Vienna. The three-day visit, made possible by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), kicked off with a lecture by Peter and Michelle at the FWF. On the next day, the two lead a well-attended workshop on content mining at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria.The visit ended with a hackday organized by openscienceASAP, and an OKFN-AT meetup on content mining. Finally, last month, I gave a talk on open data at the “Open Science Panel” on board of the MS Wissenschaft in Vienna. I also became active in the Open Access Network Austria (OANA) of the Austrian Science Fund. Specifically, I am contributing to the working group “Involvment of researchers in open access”. There, I am responsible for a visibility concept for open access researchers. Throughout the year, I have also contributed to a monthly sum-up of open science activities in order to make these activities more visible within the local community. You can find the sum-ups (only available in German) on the openscienceASAP stream. I also went to a lot of events outside Austria where I argued for more openness and transparency in science: OKCon 2013 in Geneva, SpotOn 2013 in London, and Science Online Together 2014 in Raleigh (NC). At the Open Knowledge Festival in Berlin, I was session facilitator for “Open Data and the Panton Principles for the Humanities. How do we go about that?”. The goal of this session is to devise a set of clear principles which describe what we mean by Open Data in the humanities, what these should contain and how to use them. In my role as an advocate for reproducibility I wrote a blog post on why reproducibility should become a quality criterion in science. The post sparked a lot of discussion, and was widely linked and tweeted.
by Martin Clavey

by Martin Clavey

What’s next?

The Panton Fellowship was a unique opportunity for me to work on open science, to visit open knowledge events around the world, and to meet many new people who are passionate about the topic. Naturally, the end of the fellowship does not mark the end of my involvement with the open science community. In my new role as a scientific project developer for Science 2.0 and open science at Know-Center, I will continue to advocate openness and transparency. As part of my research on altmetrics-driven discovery, I will also pursue my open source work on the Head Start framework. With regards to outreach work, I am currently busy drafting a visibility concept for open access researchers in the Open Access Network Austria (OANA).Furthermore, I am involved in efforts to establish a German-speaking open science group I had a great year, and I would like to thank everyone who got involved. Special thanks go to Peter Murray-Rust and Michelle Brook for administering the program and for their continued support. As always, if you are interested in helping out with one or the other project, please get in touch with me. If you have comments or questions, please leave them in the comments field below.

All outputs at a glance

Head Start – open source research overview visualization
Blog Posts
Audio and Video
Slides
Reports
Open Science Sum-Ups (contributions) [German]