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Open Charity Data Workshop #1

- November 20, 2014 in Events, Open Data Ireland

Dear NGO’s We are inviting you to participate in the 1st Open Charity Workshop. The idea behind this initiative is to help the Irish Charity sector to regain public trust. We want to achieve this by making already publicly accessible information about your great work available for re-use in use-friendly in the 21st century non-proprietary machine-readable formats. We want to provide your organisation with a possibility to show off stories about all thegood things donations achieve. To do this, we need your help! We want to present our project to you and we want you to help us with the stories behind it. Therefore, Open Knowledge Ireland (http://openknowledge.ie/) would like to invite a representative of your charity to the

Open Charity Data Workshop #1

When: November 24th, 2014, 14:00 – 17:00 Where:Guinness Enterprise Centre, Taylor’s Lane, Dublin 8 Register:https://ti.to/open-knowledge-ireland/open-charity-data-workshop-1   Idea Your organisation, like most other large NGOs have an independently audited report on their website detailing activities for the year and financial statements. In most cases, the financial report is signed-off by the senior auditor in a high-profile accounting firm. These are very credible and reassuring documents for any donor to read. The problem is that an individual would have to spend several hours reviewing separate charities’ annual reports before getting any sense ofwho they should be supporting. Open Data can help make this easier for charities’ donors.

Additional Information

What is open data? “A piece of data or content is open if anyone is free to use, reuse, and redistribute it — subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and/or share-alike.” (more here)

Background

One sunny day last July a group of volunteers came together to compile an open dataset for €640 million of 2012 charity data from 25 charities. We placed it in this visualization.(https://openspending.org/ie_charity_exp/views/charity-expenditure-2012-treebubble-chart#/%7E/total)

Context

  1. “Charities in crisis as 400,000 people stop donating after recent scandals”(http://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-news/charities-crisis-400000-stop-donating-3385659)
  2. The government auditor has set the goal of establishing the charity regulator in 2014 (http://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/shatter-names-head-of-new-charity-authority-1.1709776)

Benefits

  • Reassure existing charitable donors that their money is being well spent.
  • Convince people who have stopped donating after the recent scandals to start giving again.
  • A prototype of the tool which makes it easy for anyone to assess how charities use donations deployed.

Why you should go?

We want to collaborate with your organisation to create a tool, driven by already publicly available data, which will empower donors to get better insights into charities work.
  • You can add links to stories and video and photo content to your charities section of the dataset.
  • You will get a visualization for your own charity to display your data (like the above) on your website
“Don’t let recent charity scandals stop you donating”- We agree and want to help Irish Charities re-gain trust by opening up charity data to everyone and by increasing charity transparency and accountability.

What kinds of things do you worry about?

- November 13, 2014 in Open Data Ireland

  • Weather in your city: Maybe you should take an umbrella with you before you leave to work?

  • Transport: How to get from point A to point B by car, bus, bike or walking?

  • Cycling: In which areas in your city you should be more careful because they have a high probability of accidents, etc?

  • Education, which schools are in your area? What kind of schools are there (private, public, just for girls or just for boys, mixed, etc?) Are these good schools? If they are not that good: What could be the reasons? What needs to be improved?

  • Travel, meals and entrainment: Which are the best place to go out to eat? Which places have been having hygiene problems? Which are the most visiting cities around the world?

  • Health, hospitals and clinics: For example, if you are new in a city it would be important to know for you: Where are they? What is their speciality? If you are having problems with your heart, which would be the best option to go and get a treatment? Which are the problems of hospitals and clinics and how can it be improved?

  • Crime and security: Where are the most dangerous/safe places in your city? What could be the reasons? What can the government do, the citizens, etc, to improve it?

So, as you can see, all around us is information and the most important thing is to know where look for it. Did you know for example that real-time information on Dublin’s bike rent system is now available under an open licence? On the 7th of October 2014, JC Decaux tweeted this (https://twitter.com/JCDecauxDev/status/519412419844931584) and you can find it now on https://developer.jcdecaux.com/#/opendata/vls?page=getstarted under an open data license comparable to CC-By 2.0. So, What kinds of things do you worry about?

Open Data Initiative Workshop

- November 9, 2014 in Events, OGP Action Plan, OGP Ireland, Open Data Ireland

The Department of Public Expenditure and Reform (D/PER) and Open Knowledge Ireland wants to invite you to take part in its Open Data Initiative Workshop on Monday 17th of November at 6pm, at the Guinness Enterprise Center, Taylor’s Lane, Dublin 8. The Active Workshop aims to drive forward the Open Data Strategy, led by the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform (D/PER). On September 8th, this department held a public meeting on open data in Ireland. During the exchange of ideas generated by all participants in the meeting, it became clear that the demand for open data needs to be catalysed by creating real life examples of open data in Ireland that are useful for the general public and answer real questions. The idea for this workshop is to create 5+ real life examples of Open Data in Ireland being put in use and made helpful. At this event we will
  • Look at the progress Ireland has made regarding open data in availability for re-use in the last year
  • Present the Open Charity Data project, to mark potential projects, to identify obstacles and plan ways around then
  • To develop a working plan for the next 12 month
We are inviting all interested groups for open collaboration on moving this idea forward. Register on https://ti.to/open-knowledge-ireland/meetup-14  to take part! This event is kindly supported by the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform (D/PER).

Are you still asking yourself what means “Open Government” and “Open Data” and what has it to do with you?

- October 7, 2014 in OGP, OGP Action Plan, OGP Ireland, Open Data, Open Data Ireland

(originally published on saluanassabay.wordpress.com) In the last time have appeared all around the web different subjects like “Open Government” and “Open Data”, who are not really directed to a special public or have a special orientation. If you are still wondering what that all means, by reading this blog you could befind some answers to your questions.

This words do not belong to any subjects that you can not understand, instead, they relate a lot to our environment and our basic life.

“Open Government” and “Open Data” means that the information that has been collected, processed and presented by the governments must be open, while at the same time privaty and safety have to be protected.

In generals words “Open” means all data must be published with open licenses so that everyone can use and reuse the information. “Open” also means open formats (.cvs), as well as without discrimination, that means that everyone can get the information without access restrictions and for free.

Why is this so important? There are a lot of reason that we could give you; some of them are: “Open Data” allow us all to make better political decisions, that is because politicians’ programs (investigations, results, etc) are open and accessible to everyone, so that everyone can better follow it. “Open Data” allows to promote innovation because by opening the data companies can build new services according to the new requests and necessities of the population.

And now… where are we? What has all this to do with us? What does it bring us? Think in subjects like for example global warming, energy, geo-information, finance, transport, education system (school, universities, etc.), etc. All this needs to use “Open Data”.

Already now you can find in internet lots of applications using “Open Data”. That means that people have been collecting the information, putting all together, processing and presenting it with the aim that you can see it all in a friendly visualization.

This applications give you information about for example: weather in your city (maybe you should take an umbrella with you before you leave to work); transport, how to get from point A to point B by car, bus, bike or walking. If you are cycling: In which areas in your city you should be more careful because they have a high probability of accidents, etc. In the subject education, “Open Data” allows us to answer different kinds of questions like: Which schools are in your area?, What kind of schools are there? (private, public, just for girls or just for boys, mix, etc.), Are there good schools?, If there are not that good: What could be the reasons? What needs to be improved? In the area of travel, meals and entrainment, these apps allow you to find out which are the best place to go to eat, which places have been having hygiene problems, which are the most visiting cities around the world, etc. About Hospital and clinics, when, for example, you are new in a city it would be important to know for you: Where are they? What is their speciality? If you are having problems for example with your heart, which would be the best option to go and get a treatment? Which are the problems of hospitals and clinics and how can it be improved? Another field where “Open Data” has been in use constantly is for crime and the different statistics that police and government present to the population: Where are the most dangerous/safe places in your city? What could be the reasons? What can the government do, the citizens, etc, to improve it?

What is the future of “Open Data”? As you can see “Open Data” allows to have a bigger panorama to make better decision based on the reality, so as to improve services by extracting all important points by a transparent process. The future of “Open Data” should be directed towards having open up the highest quality information with the aim to integrate all it.

European Commission follows advice by Open Knowledge and Creative Commons

- July 19, 2014 in OKFN Ireland, Open Knowledge Ireland

Neelie Kroes, Vice-President of the European Commission, took the opportunity at the open knowledge festival 2014 in Berlin to present the new licensing recommendations to support the reuse of public sector information in Europe.
In it, the European Commission follows the advice of Open Knowledge to proposes the use of open licenses as defined by the Open Knowledge to promote unrestricted re-use of public sector data. They especially suggest to use the CC0 public domain license as defined by Creative commons, to allow “full flexibility for re-users” and to “reduce the complications associated with handling numerous licences, with possibly conflicting provisions.”
Further parts of the recommendations consists of guidelines on data sets, where governments should follow the priorities of the G8 Open Data charter, detailed advise on the data quality, accessibility, description, possibility of user feedback, etc. Also the important part of charges is included in the paper: “The Article 6(1) of the Directive does not preclude a zero-cost policy: it allows for documents to be made available for re-use free of charge.”
We heartily welcome this announcement and congratulate the European Commission for these well written and easy to understand guidelines!

News From Open Knowledge Ireland

- July 16, 2014 in Open Knowledge Ireland, Press Release

Hallo everyone, As you may know Open Knowledge (OK) is a non-profit organisation founded in 2004 and dedicated to promoting open data and open content in all their forms – including government data, publicly funded research and public domain cultural content. OK Ireland was officially introduced as OK chapter in May 2014; but since 2011 has been executing different kinds of projects under the topics School of Data, Open Government Data, Open Transport, Open Economics, Open Access and OpenSpending. OK Ireland is as well an active component of Irish Civil Society, we executed a civic campaign which resulted in a commitment of the Irish government to participate in the Open Government Partnership in 2013. We promote civil rights, and in particular, we advocate for a greater use of online tools as a means to increase citizen participation in public decision making. OK Ireland is a member of the Open Data Community, is working on opendata.ie to help citizens access to high value, machine readable datasets generated by the Irish Government and public sector authorities. Actually, in parallel with our running project, we are making some changes and reform our organisation and we want to invite you to visit us, to have a overview in our activities, events, services, etc and not less important to give us some feedback to help us do much better our work and reach objectives. Join us through our different channels of communication to follow along, participate, and stay informed: Web site, mailing lists & email:
web: http://openknowledge.ie
mail: info@openknowledge.ie
community forum: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/open-data-ireland
blog: http://openknowledge.ie/news/
events page: http://openknowledge.ie/events/
Twitter: @OKFirl
Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/106119681022861607353 Thanks a lot for your help, we are looking forward to heard from you.