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On *Sprezzatura*: Baldassare Castiglione’s *The Book of the Courtier* (1528)

- May 6, 2021 in Uncategorized

This is a paradox in the cocktail of qualities that define sprezzatura — the achievement of eloquence and honesty through deception and concealment.

Visualizing History: The Polish System

- May 5, 2021 in Uncategorized

For the Polish educator Antoni Jażwiński, history was best represented by an abstract grid.

“The Mark of the Beast”: Victorian Britain’s Anti-Vaxxer Movement

- April 28, 2021 in Uncategorized

Ox-faced children, elderly women sprouting horns, and cloven minds — all features attributed to Edward Jenner’s vaccine against smallpox. Introducing us to the original anti-vaxxers, Erica X Eisen explores the “vacca” in the first-ever vaccine: its bovine origins and the widespread worry that immunity came with beastly side effects.

“The Mark of the Beast”: Georgian Britain’s Anti-Vaxxer Movement

- April 28, 2021 in Uncategorized

Ox-faced children, elderly women sprouting horns, and cloven minds — all features attributed to Edward Jenner’s vaccine against smallpox. Introducing us to the original anti-vaxxers, Erica X Eisen explores the “vacca” in the first-ever vaccine: its bovine origins and the widespread worry that immunity came with beastly side effects.

William Blake’s *The Gates of Paradise* (1787-93)

- April 21, 2021 in Uncategorized

Angels emerge from avian eggs and a figure climbs a ladder to the moon, in Blake's unique take on the emblems tradition.

The Future Imagined in Albert Robida’s *La vie électrique* (1890)

- April 15, 2021 in Uncategorized

Inspired by Jules Verne’s scientific novels, The electric life has garnered retrospective praise for successfully anticipating much of modern life.

Images of Hatha Yoga from the Joga Pradīpikā (19th century)

- April 13, 2021 in Uncategorized

The nineteenth-century images collected here concern hatha yoga, the yoga of physical discipline.

“Fevers of Curiosity”: Charles Baudelaire and the Convalescent *Flâneur*

- April 8, 2021 in Uncategorized

This month marks the 200th anniversary of Charles Baudelaire’s birth, the French poet famous for his descriptions of the flâneur: a man of the crowd, who thrived in the metropolis’ multitude. Following Baudelaire through 19th-century Paris, Matthew Beaumont discovers a parallel archetype — the convalescent hero of modernity — who emerges from the sickbed into city streets with a feverish curiosity.

Announcing the Launch of *Affinities*, a Very Special Book of Images to Celebrate our 10th Anniversary.

- April 7, 2021 in Uncategorized

Gathering over 500 prints, paintings, illustrations, sketches, photographs, doodles, and everything in between, Affinities is a carefully curated journey exploring echoes and connections across more than two millennia of visual culture.

Agostino Ramelli’s Theatre of Machines (1588)

- April 1, 2021 in Uncategorized

Images from Agostino Ramelli's Diverse and Artificial Machines, which despite their detail obscure as much as they reveal.