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Adeline Harris Sears’ Autographs Quilt (1856–ca.1863)

- March 1, 2018 in abraham lincoln, autographs, celebrity, charles dickens, Craft, design, Needlework, patterns, quilt, quilting, quilts, quiltwork, Ralph Waldo Emerson, signatures

Wonderful trompe l'oeil tumbling block design quilt incorporating signatures from such luminaries as Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Rembrandt Peale, and Abraham Lincoln (one of eight American presidents represented).

Adeline Harris Sears’ Autographs Quilt (1856–ca.1863)

- March 1, 2018 in abraham lincoln, autographs, celebrity, charles dickens, Craft, design, Needlework, patterns, quilt, quilting, quilts, quiltwork, Ralph Waldo Emerson, signatures

Wonderful trompe l'oeil tumbling block design quilt incorporating signatures from such luminaries as Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Rembrandt Peale, and Abraham Lincoln (one of eight American presidents represented).

Adeline Harris Sears’ Autographs Quilt (1856–ca.1863)

- March 1, 2018 in abraham lincoln, autographs, celebrity, charles dickens, Craft, design, Needlework, patterns, quilt, quilting, quilts, quiltwork, Ralph Waldo Emerson, signatures

Wonderful trompe l'oeil tumbling block design quilt incorporating signatures from such luminaries as Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Rembrandt Peale, and Abraham Lincoln (one of eight American presidents represented).

Adeline Harris Sears’ Autographs Quilt (1856–ca.1863)

- March 1, 2018 in abraham lincoln, autographs, celebrity, charles dickens, Craft, design, Needlework, patterns, quilt, quilting, quilts, quiltwork, signatures

Wonderful trompe l'oeil tumbling block design quilt incorporating signatures from such luminaries as Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Rembrandt Peale, and Abraham Lincoln (one of eight American presidents represented).

W.F. Hooley reads Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address (1898)

- November 19, 2013 in abraham lincoln, Audio, Audio: Pre 1900s, Audio: Speech, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, gettysburg address, Internet Archive, Library of Congress, speech, Underlying Work: PD 50 Years, Underlying Work: PD 70 Years

150 years ago today, on November 19th 1863, President Lincoln delivered his famous speech at the dedication of the Gettysburg Civil War Cemetery, a cemetery set up to house and honour the dead from one of the bloodiest battles of the American Civil War which had taken place four months earlier (the sad aftermath of which is pictured above in a photograph by Timothy H. O’Sullivan). Abraham Lincoln’s carefully crafted address was in fact meant to be secondary to other presentations that day, following on as it did from a two hour speech by the orator Edward Everett. Although Lincoln’s was only just over two minutes long in it’s delivery, it came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history. In it’s short span, Lincoln reiterated the principles of human equality espoused by the Declaration of Independence and proclaimed the Civil War as a struggle for the preservation of the Union sundered by the secession crisis, with “a new birth of freedom,” that would bring true equality to all of its citizens. Lincoln also managed to redefine the Civil War as a struggle not just for the Union, but also for the principle of human equality. […]

The Serious and the Smirk: The Smile in Portraiture

- September 18, 2013 in abraham lincoln, Art & Illustrations, Articles, caravaggio, dutch, Featured Articles, Gerrit van Honthorst, leonardo da vinci, mona lisa, Painting, Photography, smiles, smiling, the laughing violinist

Why do we so seldom see people smiling in painted portraits? Nicholas Jeeves explor…