You are browsing the archive for Allgemein.

The Prototype Fund Is Looking for Your Upgrades for Swiss Democracy!

- April 9, 2021 in Allgemein, Politik, prototypefund

Now you can apply and get up to 100,000 CHF to prototype your civic tech project! With our Prototype Fund we are looking forward to fostering your ideas on how to strengthen participation and Swiss democracy with open source solutions! At the Prototype Fund we create experimental spaces for important updates to Swiss democracy. So that we can all participate in political decision making in a more extensive and profound way. As a developer or a team of technically skilled, politically engaged and creative collaborators, you will receive funding to develop your civic tech idea from concept to the first demo. You and your team can spend 6 months writing code and building a prototype of your open source software. In addition, we – Opendata.ch and Mercator Foundation Switzerland – coach, advise and connect you with the tech and other communities. Why open source? By publishing the source code, your project will be more trustworthy, effective and sustainable, as others can examine your prototype, build on it and develop it further. You can find everything you need to know about applying in our FAQ. And if you want to know more please join our Q&A event on 21 April or shoot us an email: info@prototypefund.ch!

Annual Plan 2021

- March 22, 2021 in Allgemein

As initiated last year we published again our annual plan in order show what we’re working on, what we aim to achieve and to help you – our community – to get involved. We’re more than happy to hear your feedback and learn how we might improve accessibility and comprehension. Open Annual Plan 2020 Our annual plan 2021 was set up as an Open Google Sheet on January 19. Within this document you can find:
  • one tab called [original (19.1.21)] to which we won’t apply any more changes during the year and
  • one tab [living] that we will continuously update and complement.
Alternatively, you can find the annual overview above as jpeg (status: 19.01.2021). If you want the document in another format or provide us with feedback, reach out to us via info@opendata.ch .

Learnings at the Prototype Fund

- February 8, 2021 in Allgemein, event

Six months to develop a prototype to increase political participation in Switzerland. A daunting task. Who has accepted the challenge? 24 highly motivated people are currently tackling this endeavor in five project teams.

A few months into the program, it is time to look back. How did we fare?

Get to know the key learnings of the Prototype Fund team as well as the five project teams in six blogposts:

Meet the projects teams on the final Demo Day on 2 March

Are you ready for more fun and diversity in politics and tools for making digital participation realer? Then join us on 2 March 5.30-7.30pm to try out the Prototype Fund prototypes yourself and discuss with the project teams their plans and strategies. Register here and invite other Civic Tech enthusiasts via Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook or any other platform. You can find the detailed program on the Prototype Fund site.

Werde Teil vom Vorstand / Devenez membre du Comité

- December 9, 2020 in Allgemein

Für die nächsten Wahlen suchen wir Kandidatinnen für eine teilweise Erneuerung des Vorstands: Zur Ergänzung suchen wir namentlich Vertreterinnen aus der Romandie, dem Tessin und Vertreter*innen aus dem Hochschulbereich – idealerweise eine Kombination dieser Merkmale. Damit möchten wir die Idee der offenen Daten in der französischsprachigen Schweiz stärker verankern und unsere Aktivitäten ausdehnen. Ein direkter Einbezug der Hochschulen interessiert uns, weil wir einerseits auch die Idee der open research data stärker betonen und andererseits die Nutzung von offenen Daten fördern möchten.Wenn Sie / Du sich / dich für die open data-Thematik interessiert, in diesem Bereich schon aktiv und vernetzt seid / bist, würden wir uns über eine Interessensmeldung an andreas.kellerhals@opendata.ch freuen, namentlich wüssten wir es zu schätzen, wenn sich Frauen melden würden, um dem gender-gap in diesem Bereich entgegenzuwirken. A l’occasion des prochaines élections de renouvellement partiel du comité de l’association opendata.ch, nous lançons un appel à candidature! Pour compléter et équilibrer le comité, nous recherchons explicitement des canditat(e)s de la Suisse romande, du Tessin et / ou issu(e)s du secteur universitaire ou des hautes écoles. Nous souhaitons ainsi développer davantage nos activités dans l’ensemble de la Suisse et y ancrer la thématique de l’Open Data / des données ouvertes.
Par ailleurs, nous cherchons à soutenir et améliorer l’accès, l’ouverture et l’utilisation libre des données pour et dans la recherche et espérons donc un rapprochement et une meilleure collaboration avec le monde académique. Si vous êtes intéressé(e), impliqué(e) et connecté(e) dans le domaine de l’open data, nous serions heureux de vous lire! Contactez-nous andreas.kellerhals@opendata.ch.
Les candidatures féminines sont particulièrement bienvenues: travaillons ensemble à l’implication de toutes et tous dans ce domaine. 

Wem gehört Züri?

- November 26, 2020 in Allgemein, Daten

Wem gehört Züri? Unterstütze die Recherchearbeit von www.tsri.ch und die Debatte zur Öffentlichkeit des Grundbuches. Für mehr Transparenz über Besitzverhältnisse! https://tsri.ch/grundbuch-recherche/ #transparency

To whom do you want to give your data?

- August 4, 2020 in Allgemein, Daten

While we use WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook daily, giving our phone number to the local restaurant or downloading the contact tracking app is not an option for many of us. Covid-19 has revealed many things, including the ambivalent handling of our personal data. The nation-wide awareness campaign «Data Café» run by Opendata.ch and the Mercator Switzerland Foundation is addressing a question that is becoming increasingly important in the current pandemic: “To whom and for what purpose do I want to make my data available?”. The leading Internet currency is personal data The principle of the «Data Café» is simple: Visitors receive a coffee in return for providing their full name, gender, e-mail address, birthday and canton of residence. Thereby, the commonplace online deal of “data for services”, is transferred to the analogue world and thus made tangible. “We invite people to reflect on the value and role of data in our society and make them more aware of the opportunities and dangers of data.” explains Nikki Böhler who initiated the Data Café. Reactions could not have been more diverse The Campaign was officially launched at the beginning of March at the Helmhaus Zürich. We have seen many different reactions to our offer to receive a coffee in exchange for personal data. From “my data is everywhere already anyways” to “paying with my data?! this is terrible!” we heard all kinds of reactions to our offer. Get a feeling of our the Data Café experience in our video trailer:
Visit one of our upcoming data cafés After long break due to Corona we are now ready to get back on the road and continue our tour de Suisse. Our next stops are:
  • 08.08.20 – Weekly market, Lucerne
  • 13.08.20 & 15.08.20 – Kino im Kocher, Bern
  • 18.08.20 – Frau Gerolds Garten, Zurich
  • 18.09.20 – Rathaus für Kultur, St. Gallen
  • 27.09.20 – Literature festival “Literaare”, Thun
  • 03.10.20 – Café Mitte, Basel
  • 17 – 18.10.20 – Museum for Communication, Bern
Learn to understand, protect and use data
If you have not done so already, make sure to visit our website for short tips on how to better understand, protect and benefit from data. Sign up here if you are interested in joining one of our workshops where you can talk to data experts and ask all your questions to gain practical data knowledge.

Open Data Stories 2019/20

- July 31, 2020 in Allgemein, Conference, Daten, forum, Opendata.ch

Opendata.ch 2020-05-28 13:24:52

- May 28, 2020 in Allgemein

Die Webseite entscheidsuche.ch bietet eine Suche in allen publizierten Gerichtsurteilen von Schweizer Gerichten aller Instanzen. Die Urteile wurden zuletzt im Dezember 2018 von den jeweiligen Webseiten kopiert. Für ein systematisches, regelmässiges Ernten von Urteilen fehlten dem Trägerverein bisher die finanziellen Mittel. Deshalb läuft bis Ende Juni eine Crowdfunding-Kampagne mit dem Ziel, 10’000 Franken einzusammeln. Bitte unterstützt doch dieses Open-Data-Projekt mit einer kleinen Spende und leitet den Link in Eurem Umfeld weiter, damit die angepeilte Summe erreicht wird. Link zum Crowdfunding: https://wemakeit.com/projects/entscheidsuche-ch

On the Way to the Digital Utopia

- May 26, 2020 in Allgemein, Daten, event, National

Opendata-2020-Visual
This year’s Opendata.ch/2020 Forum – New Data Narratives is all about the future of open data. But when we talk about the digital future, too often the conversation drifts off into very bleak, dystopian scenarios: transparent citizens, US Conglomerates leeching on our personal data and ubiquitous control enabled by Artificial Intelligence. But we refuse to believe that this is what the future has in store for us. As Erik Reece, Author of Utopia Drive, puts it: “…things will only get worse if we don’t engage in some serious utopian thinking.” And that is exactly what we (Francesca Giardini from Operation Libero and Nikki Böhler from Opendata.ch) did on Saturday, 22 February, at the Winterkongress 2020, and it’s also what Opendata.ch will do at this year’s forum by collecting data visions and working on them during a workshop at the forum. In our Winterkongress workshop ‘On the way to a digital Utopia’ we asked around 80 participants to turn negative future scenarios around and instead think about what a digital utopia might look.  We gave participants 10 frequently mentioned dystopian visions, each connected to an overarching theme, and asked them to imagine utopian counter examples and the measures necessary to make them reality. The results of our experiment (transcribed during the workshop) can be viewed below in German. Coming up with better solutions for our digital future is also the focus of our Opendata.ch/2020 Forum. We want to create new data narratives that steer away from dystopian scenarios and instead highlight the positive potential inherent in data technology. Come join us on 23 June online.

Results:

Gesellschaftlicher Bereich

Dystopisches Szenario (vorgegeben)

Utopische Umkehrung (durch Workshop Teilnehmende)

Zu ergreifende Massnahmen (durch Workshop Teilnehmende)

1. Ehrlichkeit

In der digitalen Dystopie sind wir nicht ehrlich mit unseren Mitmenschen, denn das digitale Denunziantentum hindert uns, Vertrauen ineinander zu fassen. Da wir uns ständig selbst zensieren, wird es für uns immer schwieriger, ehrlich zu uns selbst zu sein.

 

In der Utopie herrscht ein Netz mit verlässlichen Informationen und Austausch. Die Daten-Souveränität wird zurückgewonnen und dadurch das Recht über die eigenen Daten. Entsprechend können wir uns wieder sicher im Internet bewegen. Verlässliche Informationen sind verfügbar. Es wird transparent kommuniziert, was im Welt-Klimarat passiert, damit man weiss, wie man handeln kann. Transparenz ist ein zentrales Stichwort. Wir wissen, wie Informationen und Meinungen zustande kommen. Es existiert ein Recht auf Vergessen.

 

Die Datensouverenität wird gewährleistet, zum Beispiel über einen digitalen Avatar. Man kann selber bestimmen, wer die eigenen Daten auswertet. Es braucht in der Bildung mehr Schulung für Kritikfähigkeit. Wir müssen konferieren statt ausschliessen. Es gibt keine Zensur, sondern Einbinden. Die Technologie muss nachvollziehbar sein für die breite Masse, nicht nur für Programmiererinnen. Und es braucht einen Reset-Knopf mit Recht auf Vergessen. Der Staat darf sanktionieren (auf eine positive Art). Transparenz wird gefördert und vorgeschrieben.

 

2. Kriminalität

In der digitalen Dystopie sind wir alle sicher, weil Verbrechen vorhergesagt und die Täter/innen präventiv in Arbeitslager gesteckt werden. Hackerinnen haben keine Chance. Biases werden aufgelöst, da den Algorithmen alle Daten zur Verfügung stehen.

 

Es gibt keine Verurteilung ohne Tat. Durch die Datenlage wird die strukturelle Ursache von Kriminalität bekämpft, zum Beispiel durch freiwillige Präventionsmassnahmen auf gesellschaftlicher Ebene. Dadurch werden die individuellen Daten nicht gefährdet.

 

Die konsequente Einhaltung von Grund- und Menschenrechten wird garantiert. Strukturelle Ursachenbekämpfung ohne totalitär zu werden ist schwierig, weshalb es “open processes” braucht. Legiferierungsprozesse sollen transparent sein. Die Nachvollziehbarkeit ist wichtig. Was ist mit denen, welche die Dystopie als Utopie wahrnehmen? Mit denen müssen wir in einer politischen Entscheidungsfindung klar kommen.

 

3. Gerechtigkeit /

 Jurisdiktion

In der digitalen Dystopie hat man keine Möglichkeit, Entscheide anzufechten oder vor die nächste Instanz zu ziehen, denn die Rechtsprechung wird durch den vorprogrammierten Einsatz menschlicher Betätigung obsolet.

 

In der digitalen Utopie versteht jeder Mensch seine Rechte und wie sie sich auf die eigene Situation anwenden lassen. Juristische Informationsgewinnung ist zugänglich und effizient. Sinnlose und alte Gesetze werden über Bord geschmissen. Die Technologie hilft uns (der Bevölkerung) zu koordinieren, damit wir gemeinsam unser Recht einfordern können.

 

Es braucht ein Jus-Google Translate. Das bedeutet, Gesetzestexte können in verständliche Texte übersetzt werden, damit sie jeder verstehen kann. Zudem benötigen wir eine Rechtsberater-App oder ein Netzwerk, damit jeder Unterstützung erhalten kann. Dafür braucht es eine Software, welche open source ist. Zudem muss der Mensch “on the loop” oder “in the loop” sein. Und es muss sichergestellt werden, dass jede Entscheidung nachvollzogen werden kann.

 

4. Gesetzgebung

In der digitalen Dystopie ist die Gesellschaft nicht durch demokratisch erarbeitete/legitimierte Gesetze reguliert, sondern durch den fest einprogrammierten Code in der Gesellschafts-Betriebssoftware.

 

In der digitalen Utopie gibt es keine Gesellschafts-Betriebssoftware, sondern eine Vorschlagssoftware, welche die Interessen bewertet und Ratschläge gibt. Dabei wird ein Lobby-Filter angewandt und ein transparentes Informationssystem gewährleistet. Zudem dominiert die menschliche Kontrolle.

 

Es braucht einen agilen Code. Die Software dafür muss in interdisziplinären Teams mit Ethikexpertinnen, Sozialwissenschaften und Technologieexpertinnen entwickelt werden. Die Software muss frei und offen sein. Auf gesellschaftlicher Ebene braucht es einen Rahmen, mit sichergestellten Menschenrechten. Das Narrativ ändern. Der Staat ist gefragt: Die entsprechende Bildung und dazugehörigen Kompetenzen müssen sichergestellt werden. Der Journalismus ist dafür auch sehr wichtig, weil viele der Narrative momentan von den Firmen stammen. Die Frage stellt sich: Wie kann die Software überwacht oder kontrolliert werden? Eine behördliche Instanz überwacht das und vergibt vielleicht auch Aufträge. Zusätzlich braucht es eine gesellschaftliche Instanz, die über alles wacht.

 

5. Wettbewerb

In der digitalen Dystopie entfällt der wirtschaftliche Wettbewerb, da sich durch Skalierungs- und Netzwerkeffekte 3-4 globale Unternehmenskonglomerate herausgebildet haben, welche nun die Volkswirtschaften einzelner Nationen diktieren.

 

Wollen wir Plattformen aufbrechen? Oder erbringen Plattformen Nutzen? Will man die Plattformen regulieren? Wir sind auf der zweiten Schiene. Plattformen sollen Infrastrukturen sein (wie Strom oder Verkehr), welche staatlich zur Verfügung gestellt werden. Dieses Konzept wird verbunden mit dem souveränen Eigentum an Daten.

 

Als Pendant zum Plattform-Kapitalismus entsteht “Digital Commons”. Plattformen bleiben bestehen, aber tragen zum Gemeinnutzen bei. Datensouverenität ist ein grosses Thema. Auf gesellschaftlicher Ebene wird der Aspekt der digitalen Kompetenz sehr relevant (man weiss, wie die Mechanismen funktionieren, was sie wollen und, dass man Kunde ist). Dafür braucht es die entsprechende Bildung. Auf technologischer Ebene herrscht “Privacy by Default” mit Opt-in Charakteristik. Es gibt klare Standards für Neutralität. Dadurch wird findet Chancen-Nivellierung statt und Interoperabilität existiert. Aggregierte Intelligenz soll nicht “festkleben”. Auf staatlicher Ebene heisst das, dass wir Bereitstellung von anonymisierten Datensätzen (Datensouverenität) für geprüfte Dienstleistungen sicherstellen. Dafür müssen Frameworks erarbeitet werden, um zu definieren, welche Daten wo erhoben werden dürfen. Daten sind nicht böse, sondern müssen rekontextualisiert werden.

 

6. Lohnarbeit

In der digitalen Dystopie entscheidet ein Algorithmus, wo welche menschlichen Fähigkeiten am effektivsten eingesetzt werden. Wir haben keine Wahl und werden mal hier mal da eingesetzt, um der internationalen Wirtschaft zu dienen.

 

Dank der Automatisierung oder der Besteuerung können wir ein bedingungsloses Grundeinkommen einführen. Dadurch wird Arbeit neu definiert: Die wenigen Ziele, die Mann / Frau erreichen muss, sind für das Allgemeinwohl und unter gesicherten Arbeitsstandards zu vollbringen. Eventuell kann der Algorithmus Angebot und Nachfrage meiner Fähigkeiten prüfen und matchen (mit transparenten Kriterien).

 

Bedingungsloses Grundeinkommen schafft die Basis, um von der Dystopie wegzukommen. Dadurch kommen wir hin zu einer Utopie, in welcher wir bestimmen können. Wir haben Geld zur Verfügung, um Jobs nicht notwendigerweise anzunehmen. Der Staat gibt die gesetzlichen Rahmenbedingungen vor. Arbeit wird neu bewertet und Fähigkeiten werden neu bewertet. Es geht um Gemeinwohl, statt um finanzielle Rendite. Dafür sind Schulen und Schulungen gefragt, um individuum zu ermächtigen. Bereits in der Kita muss man anfangen. Die Technologie wird wieder Dienstleister. Es existiert ein transparenter Open-Source Filter, um unsere Jobwahl zu unterstützen, wobei keine Entscheidungsgewalt beim Algorithmus liegt.

 

7. Vertrauen

In der digitalen Dystopie haben wir keine Möglichkeit und Befugnis, Rechenschaft zu verlangen. Wir vertrauen weder der Regierung, noch einander, da sich alle hinter den technisch unterstützten Entscheiden verstecken können und digitales Denunziantentum gefördert wird.

 

Auf einer Regierungsebene muss Transparenz herrschen, um Vertrauen zu stärken. Entscheidungen müssen transparent gefällt und von Menschen getragen werden.

 

Die Sozialkompetenz ist wichtig, um Vertrauen zu schaffen. Diese Kompetenz soll an der Schule gestärkt werden. Dafür müssen auch die Lehrerinnen Sozialkompetenzen trainieren, in der Lehrerausbildung. Das reicht nicht fürs ganze Leben, weshalb Weiterbildung sehr wichtig ist. Vor dem Bildschirm verändert sich die Anforderung an diese Kompetenz nochmals. Deshalb braucht es zusätzlich eine Sensibilisierung für die Spezialitäten des digitalen Raumes. Es muss möglich sein, Rechenschaften einzufordern. Das geht bereits, aber ist sehr kompliziert. Hürde für Rechenschaftsablegung senken mit Digitalisierung, anstatt auf Briefpost warten.

 

8. Demokratie

In der digitalen Dystopie ist die Demokratie faktisch überflüssig geworden, denn durch demoskopische Datenerhebungen weiss die digital gestärkte Regierung immer schon im Voraus, wie wir über welches Thema denken.

 

Digitale Mittel werden für dezentrale und inklusive Meinungsbildung genutzt. Zwischen Experten und politisch Gebildeten findet mehr Austausch statt. Die Datenerhebung ist demokratisch öffentlich und transparent.

 

Das Problem ist, dass ein Spannungsfeld zwischen Anonymität und Transparenz besteht. Es muss die technische Möglichkeit bestehen, eine anonyme Stimmabgabe sicherzustellen. Sonst muss es analog passieren. Es werden Technologien und Plattformen gefördert, welche die dezentrale Meinungsbildung ermöglichen. Diese darf nicht privatwirtschaftlich verzerrt sein. Es soll möglichst niedrige Hürden geben, um sich politisch zu beteiligen. Es braucht staatlich gesetzliche Rahmenbedingungen, wie Lobby Control. Die Gesellschaft muss bereit sein, diese Chancen wahrzunehmen und das dystopische Denkmuster zu verlassen.

 

9. Gesundheit

In der digitalen Dystopie haben wir keine Befugnis, unsere Gesundheit selbst zu managen oder eigene Entscheidungen zu fällen. Individuelle und gesellschaftliche Gesundheit-Massnahmen werden massgeschneidert vom internationalen Health-Algorithmus vorgegeben.

 

In der digitalen Utopie haben wir die Befugnis, unsere Gesundheit zu managen. Massnahmen werden von einem offenen Algorithmus vorgeschlagen. Eigene Präferenzen können angewandt werden.

 

Es braucht Open-Source Software, Datenhoheit, Wahlfreiheit und Anonymisierung. Die Krankenkassen müssen entsprechend eingestellt werden, damit es nicht mehr um Kostenoptimierung sondern um Solidarität geht. Für die Datenhoheit sollte eine Zweckbindung der Daten technisch sicher umsetzt werden (es wird technisch sichergestellt, dass Daten nur dafür genutzt werden, wofür sie freigegeben worden sind). Wenn ein gutes elektronisches Patientendossier da wäre, wäre das eine gute Grundlage. Transparenz und Aufklärung der Bevölkerung sind auch wichtige Punkte.

 

Kommunikation

In der digitalen Dystopie ist die Digitale Kommunikation in jedem Falle und von allen einsehbar, weder Verschlüsselungstechnik noch neue Formen der Kommunikation bieten wirklich Schutz. Unsere Kommunikation ist zudem eingeschränkt und in vorgegebene Bahnen gelenkt.

 

In der digitalen Utopie sind unsere Kommunikation und unsere Daten sicher verschlüsselt. Dennoch greifen Mechanismen zum Schutz der Menschenwürde. Gar keine Kontrolle kann auch gefährlich sein.

 

Es wurde eine Debatte über die Infrastrukturanforderungen geführt. Es braucht die Verschlüsselung der Kommunikation. Müssten wir die Plattformen (die hinter der Kommunikation stehen) so weit runterbrechen, dass es wieder Peer to Peer ist? Auf der technischen Seite braucht es Kryptologie ohne Backdoors. Wie kriegen wir das hin, dass sich die Toleranz in der Gesellschaft so weit verbreitet, dass Hate Speech kein Problem mehr ist und Minderheitenschutz automatisch gewährleistet ist.

 

 

 

Annual Report 2019 + Other News

- May 6, 2020 in Allgemein

Next to the annual plan, which we want to publish every year from now on, we have decided to create an annural report in order to present in a concisive form what we have achieved in the past year. We had the report ready since February, but due to the current circumstances, we have almost forgot to share our first version with you. Now, we’re more than happy to hear your feedback and learn how we might improve upon this first trial: Since the end of 2019, we have started new projects as you can see in our annual plan 2020 and our projects overview. Furthermore, we are very happy to let you know that we have hired another team member taking care of events and community as you can see in our team overview.