You are browsing the archive for anatomy.

Diagrams from Dr Alesha Sivartha’s Book of Life (1898)

- November 15, 2017 in anatomy, brains, mysticism, phrenology, spirituality, theosophy

A series of superbly intricate and striking "brain maps", illustrating Dr Alesha Sivartha's unique blend of blend of science, sociology, mysticism and religion, a spiritual teaching which apparently attracted the attention of Mark Twain among others.

Anatomical Illustrations from 15th-century England

- January 5, 2016 in anatomy, galen, pseudo-galen, wound man

Anatomical illustrations from an English medical treatise dating from the mid 15th century, including a Wound Man illustration, depicting a man who has been stabbed, bitten, and wounded by arrows, as well as bludgeoned in the arm and head.

Anatomical Illustrations from 15th-century England

- January 5, 2016 in anatomy, galen, pseudo-galen, wound man

Anatomical illustrations from an English medical treatise dating from the mid 15th century, including a Wound Man illustration, depicting a man who has been stabbed, bitten, and wounded by arrows, as well as bludgeoned in the arm and head.

Jacob Sarnoff and the Strange World of Anatomical Filmmaking

- September 2, 2015 in anatomy, Curator's Choice, Featured, Public Domain

Miriam Posner, Digital Humanities program coordinator at UCLA and guest curator at the NLM, on what led a 1920s Brooklyn surgeon to remove the veins from a day-old infant, mount them on a board, and film them being pumped with air.

Frederik Ruysch: The Artist of Death

- March 5, 2014 in anatomy, Art & Illustrations, Articles, cadavers, dioramas, embalming, Featured Articles, frederik ruysch, preservation, Science & Medicine, skeletons

Luuc Kooijmans explores the work of Dutch anatomist Frederik Ruysch, known for his remarkable ‘still life’ displays which blurred the boundary between scientific preservation and vanitas art.

The Belly of a Horse (1820)

- July 31, 2013 in anatomy, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, farrier, horse, horses, Images, Images-19th, Images-Animals, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Science, National Library of Medicine, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide

Anatomical diagram from William Carver’s Practical horse farrier, or, The traveller’s pocket companion: shewing the best method to preserve the horse in health; and likewise the cure of the most prominent diseases to which this noble animal is subject, in the United States of America : the whole being the result of nearly forty years’ experience, with an extensive practice, published in 1820. U.S. National Library of Medicine Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and […]

Remmelin’s Anatomical ‘Flap’ Book (1667)

- June 11, 2013 in anatomy, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, flap book, Images, Images-17th, Images-Science, National Library of Medicine, remmelin, Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions

This volume is a rare edition in Dutch of the greatest of the anatomical ‘flap’ books. The work features three full-page plates with dozens of detailed anatomical illustrations superimposed so that lifting the layers shows the anatomy as it would appear during dissection. Although flaps had been used in printing before, Remmelin was the first to use them on this scale. Eight prints of the plates were produced then cut apart and pasted together to form the layers. The first authorized edition was printed in Latin in 1619 with the title Catoptrum Microcosmicum. The plates were printed in 1613, and the text without the plates was printed the following year, both without the consent of the author. Although Remmelin’s work was very popular and went through a number of editions, the format of the flaps was very delicate and not practical for the dissection room. Copies such as this one with all of the flaps intact are very rare. (Text from the NLM website) U.S. National Library of Medicine Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review [...]

Vesalius and the Body Metaphor

- April 18, 2013 in anatomy, Andreas Vesalius, Articles, Books, Culture & History, language, medicine, metaphor, Science & Medicine, surgery, Vesalius

City streets, a winepress, pulleys, spinning tops, a ray fish, curdled milk: just a…

Medical Imagery of the 15th Century

- March 13, 2013 in anatomy, astrology, collections, Images, Images-15th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-People, Images-Science, medicine, medieval, zodiac, zodiac man

The following images are all taken from Tradition und Naturbeobachtung in den Illustrationen Medizinischer Handschriften und Frühdrucke vornehmlich des 15. Jahrhunderts (1907) by Karl Sudhoff – a book on the topic of medical illustrations in manuscripts and early printed books (primarily) of the 15th century. Included amongst the depictions are a few of the Zodiac Man (or homo signorum), a common figure in late medieval depictions of the body who had every part of his body linked with an astrological sign. See the book to learn from where each image has been sourced by Sudhoff, and if you speak German, to learn more about them. (The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the University of Toronto). DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable public good, and to curate and showcase the most interesting out-of-copyright works on the web. SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the [...]

Jehan Cousin’s Livre de Pourtraiture (1608)

- February 11, 2013 in anatomy, collections, geometry, Images, Images-16th, Images-17th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-People, Images-Science, proportion, the body

Selected images from a 1608 edition of Livre de Pourtraiture by Jehan Cousin the Younger (ca. 1522–1595), son of of the famous painter and sculptor Jehan Cousin the Elder (ca. 1490-ca. 1560) who was often compared to his contemporary, Albrecht Dürer. Just before his death, Jehan the Elder published his noted work Livre de Perspective in 1560 in which he noted that his son would soon be publishing a companion entitled, Livre de Pourtraiture. While there have been some reports that an edition of Livre de Pourtraiture was fist printed in 1571 and again in 1589, no copies appear to exist. Instead, the most likely first printing of the work was 1595 in Paris by David Leclerc, with woodcuts engraved by Jean Leclerc, just after Jehan Cousin the Younger’s death. The book is one of the most famous on the subject of artistic anatomy and was printed again and again into the late 17th century. (All images from the U.S. National Library of Medicine). DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable [...]