You are browsing the archive for architecture.

The Triumphal Arch of Emperor Maximilian I (1515)

- September 6, 2018 in Albrecht durer, architecture, Emperor Maximilian I, fantasy architecture, propaganda, Triumphal Arch

Dürer's extraordinary, grandiose triumphal arch which he designed for Emperor Maximilian — a fine example of fantasy architecture and imperial propaganda.

The Triumphal Arch of Emperor Maximilian I (1515)

- September 6, 2018 in Albrecht durer, architecture, Emperor Maximilian I, fantasy architecture, propaganda, Triumphal Arch

Dürer's extraordinary, grandiose triumphal arch which he designed for Emperor Maximilian — a fine example of fantasy architecture and imperial propaganda.

Albert Racinet’s L’Ornement Polychrome (1869–73)

- July 5, 2018 in architecture, art, design, ornament, Ornaments

Highlights from a visual record in 100 plates of the decorative arts from antiquity to the eighteenth century.

Albert Racinet’s L’Ornement Polychrome (1869–73)

- July 5, 2018 in architecture, art, design, ornament, Ornaments

Highlights from a visual record in 100 plates of the decorative arts from antiquity to the eighteenth century.

Palacio’s Plan for Colossal Monument to Columbus (1890)

- July 2, 2014 in Alberto Palacio, architecture, Chicago World's Fair, Christopher columbus, design, globe, monument

The truly gigantic monument planned by the Bilboan architect Alberto Palacio designed for the 1893 Chicago World's Fair in honour of Christopher Columbus.

Palacio’s Plan for Colossal Monument to Columbus (1890)

- July 2, 2014 in Alberto Palacio, architecture, Chicago World's Fair, Christopher columbus, design, globe, monument

The truly gigantic monument planned by the Bilboan architect Alberto Palacio designed for the 1893 Chicago World's Fair in honour of Christopher Columbus.

Böckler’s Pleasure Garden Plans (1664)

- May 21, 2013 in architecture, collections, design, Deutsche Fotothek, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, gardens, Images, Images-17th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Landscapes, Images-Maps, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide, Wikimedia Commons

Selected illustrations from the German architect and engineer Georg Andreas Böckler’s Architectura Curiosa Nova (1664). The book is mostly concerned with the theory of hydrodyanmics, water pump systems and different designs for water fountains, but also contains this series of elaborate geometrical pleasure garden designs. It’s not entirely clear whether they are projected plans or a record of what already existed (if anyone knows then please do let us know!). Housed at: Wikimedia Commons | From: Deutsche Fotothek Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver [...]

Various Forms of Architecture (1636)

- February 22, 2013 in architecture, collections, Images, Images-17th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Landscapes, perspective

A selection of illustrations from Variae Architecturae Formae, a series of architectural studies after the works of Joanne Vredemanni Vriesio, also known in Dutch as Hans Vredeman de Vries (1527–c.1607). De Vries was a Dutch Renaissance architect, painter, and engineer. Studying Vitruvius and Sebastiano Serlio, (translated by his teacher Pieter Coecke van Aelst), he became an internationally known specialist in perspective and, as well as books on architecture, perspective and garden design, he became the city architect and fortification engineer for the city of Antwerp. The etchers of the images in the book are given as Jan and Lucas Van Doetecum, two brothers from Hollstein.(Wikipedia) (All images taken from Variae Architecturae Formae (1636) housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by The Getty. Hat-tip to John Ptak and his wonderful Pinterest boards where we first learnt of the book). DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable public good, and to curate and showcase the most interesting out-of-copyright works on the web. SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free [...]

Entries to a competition to design a new tower in London (1890)

- July 16, 2012 in architecture, Images, Images-19th, Images-Engraving-Line, london stump, non-article, tower competition, watkin's folly

A selection of the more inventive entries to a competition to design a new tower for London. The year previous, 1889, saw the hugely successful Eiffel Tower go up in the centre of Paris, and the good people of London, not to be outdone, decided to get one of their own. A wonderful array of designs were put forward. Many were suspiciously similar to the Eiffel Tower and many erred on the wackier side of things, such as Design no.19, the “Century Tower”, reminiscent of a huge screw, and London Vegetarian Society’s design for an “aerial colony” which came complete with hanging vegetable gardens and a one-twelfth scale replica of the Great Pyramid on its summit. The very practical design number 37 by Stewart, McLaren and Dunn was eventually chosen to be awarded the 500 guinea prize-money and built in Wembley Park. Construction began in 1892 but the company in charge of the erection, The Metropolitan Tower Company, soon ran into problems including falling chronically behind schedule due to marshy ground and then financial difficulties which eventually led to their liquidation in 1889. Construction ceased after only 47 metres had been completed. The abandoned ‘tower’ (known as the Watkins Folly, or The London Stump) remained a spectacle in the park for a number of years before being deemed unsafe and blown up in 1904. Wembley Stadium ended up being built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition. When the stadium was rebuilt in 2000, the lowering of the level of the pitch resulted in the concrete foundations of the failed tower being rediscovered.

(All images extracted from Descriptive illustrated catalogue of the sixty-eight competitive designs for the great tower for London compiled and edited by Fred. C. Lynde (1890). See the book in its entirety, including descriptions and more design entries, here in our Text collections.














Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

flattr this!

Catalogue of the 68 competitive designs for the great tower for London (1890)

- July 16, 2012 in architecture, competition, Eiffel Tower, london stump, london tower, non-article, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Non-fiction, Texts: Science, tower competition, watkin's folly, wembley


Descriptive illustrated catalogue of the sixty-eight competitive designs for the great tower for London compiled and edited by Fred. C. Lynde for the Tower Company; 1890; Industries, London .

A catalogue showing the entries for a competition to design a new tower for London. The year previous, 1889, saw the hugely successful Eiffel Tower go up in the centre of Paris, and the good people of London, not to be outdone, decided to get one of their own. A wonderful array of designs were put forward. Many were suspiciously similar to the Eiffel Tower and many erred on the wackier side of things, such as Design no.19, the “Century Tower”, reminiscent of a huge screw, and London Vegetarian Society’s design for an “aerial colony” which came complete with hanging vegetable gardens a one-twelfth scale replica of the Great Pyramid on its summit. The very practical design number 37 by Stewart, McLaren and Dunn was eventually chosen to be awarded the 500 guinea prize-money and built in Wembley Park. Construction began in 1892 but the company in charge of the erection, The Metropolitan Tower Company, soon ran into problems including falling chronically behind schedule due to marshy ground and then financial difficulties which eventually led to their liquidation in 1889. Construction ceased after only 47 metres had been completed. The abandoned ‘tower’ (known as the Watkins Folly, or The London Stump) remained a spectacle in the park for a number of years before being deemed unsafe and blown up in 1904. Wembley Stadium ended up being built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition. When the stadium was rebuilt in 2000, the lowering of the level of the pitch resulted in the concrete foundations of the failed tower being rediscovered.





(For more info see the Wikipedia article and also this blog where the pictures above came from. There is also a nice post on the subject over at London Particulars. Also check out our post in the Images collection for a selection of some of the more inventive designs.)

Open Library link










Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

flattr this!