You are browsing the archive for Audio: Classical.

Two songs from Verdi’s La Traviata (1910)

- October 10, 2013 in Audio, Audio: 1910s, Audio: Classical, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Internet Archive, la traviata, Lucrezia Bori, opera, Underlying Work: PD 50 Years, Underlying Work: PD 70 Years, verdi

“Ah! fors’è lui” and “Sempre libera” from Act I of Giuseppe Verdi’s La Traviata performed by the Spanish singer Lucrezia Bori in August 1910 for Edison Records. Verdi’s opera in 3 acts has a libretto penned by Francesco Maria Piave and is based on La Dame aux Camélias (1852), a play adapted from the novel by Alexandre Dumas. Housed at: Internet Archive Underlying Work: PD 70 & PD 50 Years | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: VBR MP3 HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your […]

Adelina Patti singing “The Last Rose of Summer” (1905)

- January 28, 2013 in Adelina Patti, Audio, Audio: 1900s, Audio: Classical, collections, opera, verdi

A recording from 1905 of one of the 19th century’s most famous opera singers Adelina Patti singing “The Last Rose of Summer“, a song based on the poem by Irish poet Thomas Moore. Although the sound quality isn’t great and her voice is past its prime (she was 62 yrs old), through the dust and scratches we can hear glimpses of why Giuseppe Verdi, writing in 1877, described her as being perhaps the finest singer who had ever lived. Patti’s piano accompanist for this recording and others she made at the time, Landon Ronald, recalls his experience working with her: “When the little (gramophone) trumpet gave forth the beautiful tones, she went into ecstasies! She threw kisses into the trumpet and kept on saying, ‘Ah! Mon Dieu! Maintenant je comprends pourquoi je suis Patti! Oh oui! Quelle voix! Quelle artiste! Je comprends tout!’ [Ah! My Lord! Now I understand why I am Patti! Oh yes! What a voice! What an artist! I understand everything!] Her enthusiasm was so naïve and genuine that the fact that she was praising her own voice seemed to us all to be right and proper.” (Wikipedia) MP3 Download Internet Archive Link SIGN UP TO THE [...]

Cantonese Opera – White Hibiscus at Night (1920)

- October 12, 2012 in Audio, Audio: 1920s, Audio: Classical, Audio: Traditional, cantonese opera, chinese opera, collections, opera, peony su

The traditional Chinese song “White Hibiscus at Night” sung by Peony Su, a star of the Cantonese Opera during the 1920s and 30s. Learn more here. MP3 Download Internet Archive Link Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

Bach’s organ works played by Albert Schweitzer (1935)

- September 21, 2012 in albert schweitzer, Audio, Audio: 1930s, Audio: Classical, bach, baroque, non-article, organ



Albert Schweitzer was a German (writing in French also) theologian, organist, philosopher, physician, and medical missionary. As well as his important theological work (he depicted Jesus as literally believing the end of the world was coming in his own lifetime), he developed various theories on music, in particular the work of J.S. Bach. He explained figures and motifs in Bach’s Chorale Preludes as painter-like tonal and rhythmic imagery illustrating themes from the words of the hymns on which they were based. They were works of devotional contemplation in which the musical design corresponded to literary ideas, conceived visually. Schweitzer’s interpretative approach greatly influenced the modern understanding of Bach’s music. His pamphlet “The Art of Organ Building and Organ Playing in Germany and France” (1906) effectively launched the 20th century Orgelbewegung, which turned away from romantic extremes and rediscovered baroque principles. In addition to his contribution to music theory, Schweiter also made many seminal recordings of Bach’s organ recitals. In mid-December 1935 he began to record for Columbia Records on the organ of All Hallows, Barking-by-the-Tower, in London – the recordings above. He developed a particular technique for recording the performances of Bach’s music known as “The Schweitzer Technique” which involved a new positioning of microphones. (Wikipedia)

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Note these recordings are in the public domain in the EU, but may not be in other jurisdictions (e.g. the US). Please check its status in your jurisdiction before re-using.










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Aeolian Piano Rolls (1903)

- July 20, 2012 in aeolian company, Audio, Audio: 1900s, Audio: Classical, Audio: Jazz/Ragtime, automatic piano, autopiano, non-article, piano rolls, pianola

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The piano roll was the first medium which could be produced and copied industrially and made it possible to provide the customer with actual music quickly and easily. It consisted of a roll of paper with perforations punched in it, the position and length of which determined the note played on the ‘autopiano’ (also known as a player piano, or pianola). These self-playing pianos contained a pneumatic mechanism that operated the piano action via the pre-programmed rolls. These recordings are from the rolls of the Aeolian Company, one of the biggest producers of the automatic piano. By 1903, the Aeolian Company had more than 9,000 roll titles in their catalog, adding 200 titles per month. (Wikipedia)

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    Poet and Peasant Overture played on the Banjo (1925)

    - April 8, 2012 in Audio, Audio: 1920s, Audio: Classical, non-article

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    “King of the Banjo” Eddie Peabody with a rearrangement for the banjo of Franz von Suppé’s “Poet and Peasant Overture” originally dating from 1846.

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