You are browsing the archive for Audio: Traditional.

A Midsummer Schottische

- June 21, 2013 in Audio, Audio: 1920s, Audio: Traditional, collections, Internet Archive, Underlying Work: PD 70 Years

Traditional music for the midsummer “Schottische” dance, known as “Schottis” in Scandinavia where this score is thought to have originated from. The dance is considered by The Oxford Companion to Music to be a kind of slower polka, with continental-European origin (possibly Bohemia). The recording might possibly be of accordion duo Arvid Franzen and Einar Holt recorded in the mid 1920s in New York. Housed at: Internet Archive Underlying Work: PD 70 Years | Digital Copy: Pending Clarification Download: Flac | VBR MP3 | Ogg Vorbis HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the […]

Traditional Italian song with Zampogna and Ciaramella (1920)

- May 13, 2013 in Audio, Audio: 1920s, Audio: Traditional, bagpipes, Ciaramella, collections, italy, Zampogna

A Zampogna is an Italian bagpipe, and a Ciaramella is a small woodwind that plays the higher melody line over the Zampogna’s drone. This combination is often used for traditional Christmas music, as in this circa 1920 recording of a “Novena Di Natale” by uncredited performers. MP3 Download Internet Archive Link HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription! Name: E-mail:

James Mooney’s Ghost Dance Recordings (1894)

- April 2, 2013 in Audio, Audio: Pre 1900s, Audio: Traditional, Cherokee, collections, Ghost Dance, James Mooney, native americans

A series of recordings made by James Mooney in 1894 of different Native American Ghost Dance songs. According to the Library Of Congress notes that accompany the recordings, the performances are probably by Mooney himself and not by Native Americans. Mooney was an ethnographer and self-taught expert on American tribes through his own studies and his careful observation during long residences with different groups, specifically the Cherokee. He did major studies of Southeastern Indians, as well as those on the Great Plains. His most notable works were his ethnographic studies of the Ghost Dance after Sitting Bull’s death in 1890, a widespread 19th-century religious movement among various Native American culture groups. According to the prophet Jack Wilson (Wovoka)’s teachings, proper practice of the dance would reunite the living with the spirits of the dead and bring peace, prosperity, and unity to native peoples throughout the region. MP3 Download Part 1 / Part 2

Slovak Folk Songs (1928/30)

- February 18, 2013 in Adele Keshelak, Audio, Audio: 1930s, Audio: Traditional, collections, folk, Michael Tokarick, Slovak, Slovakia

Adele Keshelak sings three pairs of traditional Rusyn folk songs from Slovakia, recorded in New York on January 30th 1930: Track 1 – “Rusadelina Fialocka” (“Forget me Not”) and “D’Irava Mi Stricha Na Stajni” (“My Pet Horse Was Stolen”); Track 2 – “Na Dolini, V Hustom L’ Is’ I Na Dubi” (“In The Valley, In The Forest”) and “D’Ivki, D’Ivki Hej D’Ivki Na Selo” (“Girls, Girls, to Maidenlane”); Track 3 – “Uz Singl’ujut Zakryvajut Kasarnu” (“They’re Fitting Out The Barracks”) and “Na Oktobra, Na Persoho” (“Joining The Army”). The accordion soloist is Pawel Ondricka. Michael Tokarick provides one of the introductory speaking voices on Track 3; below are two folk songs form his miner’s band. These two Slovak folk dances were recorded in Camden, New Jersey on May 11th 1928. “Minersville Polka” is named after Tokarick’s hometown in the coal mining region of Pennsylvania. “Zelenim Hajecku” (“In The Green Fields”) is a traditional folk tune. MP3 Download: Adele Keshelak / Michael Tokarick Internet Archive link: Adele Keshelak / Michael Tokarick DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote [...]

Frank C. Stanley singing Auld Lang Syne (1910)

- December 28, 2012 in Audio, Audio: 1910s, Audio: Traditional, auld lang syne, collections, frank c. stanley, new year, robert burns

Frank C. Stanley performing Auld Lang Syne, the poem written by the Scotsman Robert Burns which is traditionally sung to celebrate the start of the New Year at the stroke of midnight. The song’s Scots title may be translated into English literally as “old long since”, or more idiomatically, “long long ago”, “days gone by” or “old times”. Consequently “For auld lang syne”, as it appears in the first line of the chorus, might be loosely translated as “for (the sake of) old times”. The lyrics of the poem were themselves heavily based on pre-existing verses. Robert Burns sent a copy of his song to the Scots Musical Museum with the remark, “The following song, an old song, of the olden times, and which has never been in print, nor even in manuscript until I took it down from an old man.” Some of the lyrics were indeed “collected” rather than composed by the poet; the ballad “Old Long Syne” printed in 1711 by James Watson shows considerable similarity in the first verse and the chorus to Burns’ later poem, and is almost certainly derived from the same “old song”. It is a fair supposition to attribute the rest of [...]

Omar Rabbi Elozor by Cantor Meyer Kanewsky and his choir (1919)

- December 5, 2012 in Audio, Audio: 1910s, Audio: Traditional, Cantor Meyer Kanewsky, collections, hebrew, jewish, Omar Rabbi Elozor, talmud

“Omar Rabbi Elozor” (In English: “Said Rabbi Eliezar”), performed by Cantor Meyer Kanewsky and his choir in 1919 for Edison Records. The lyrics are based on the last passage of Tractate Berakhot, from the Talmud, with a few repeats. The first line roughly translates as: “Said Rabbi Elazar, quoting Rabbi Chaninah, Scholars increase the levels of peace in the world”. Wikimedia Commons link Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

President Woodrow Wilson’s daughter singing Star Spangled Banner (1915)

- November 6, 2012 in america, Audio, Audio: 1910s, Audio: Traditional, collections, president, star spangled banner, u.s. presidents, woodrow wilson

Margaret Woodrow Wilson, the daughter of President at the time Thomas Woodrow Wilson, singing the U.S. national anthem “Star Spangled Banner” in 1915. After her mother’s death in 1914 Margaret served as the First Lady of the United States until her father’s second marriage in 1915. She would go on to make several recordings around 1918. In 1938 she travelled to the ashram of Sri Aurobindo in Pondicherry, India where she chose to stay for the rest of her life. She was later known in the Sri Aurobindo Ashram as ‘Nistha’ (Sanskrit for “sincerity”). In 1942, she and the scholar Joseph Campbell edited the English translation of the classical work on the Hindu mystic, Sri Ramakrishna, The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna by Swami Nikhilananda, which was published in 1942. She was to die two years later, 6 years after entering the ashram, of a kidney infection aged 57. (Wikipedia) The lyrics of the “The Star-Spangled Banner” come from “Defence of Fort McHenry”, a poem written in 1814 by the 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet, Francis Scott Key, after he witnessed the bombardment of Fort McHenry by the British Royal Navy ships in Chesapeake Bay 200 years ago this year in [...]

Recital of The 23rd Psalm and “He Leadeth Me” (1919)

- October 19, 2012 in 23rd psalm, Audio, Audio: 1910s, Audio: Speech, Audio: Traditional, collections, He Leadeth Me, psalm, Religion

The 23rd Psalm recited by Rev. William H. Morgan D.D. and followed by a rendition by the Calvary Choir of the hymn “He Leadeth Me”, originally written by Joseph Gilmore who had this to say about its creation: As a young man who re­cent­ly had been grad­u­at­ed from Brown Un­i­ver­si­ty and New­ton The­o­lo­gic­al In­sti­tu­tion, I was sup­ply­ing for a cou­ple of Sun­days the pul­pit of the First Bap­tist Church in Phil­a­del­phia. At the mid-week ser­vice, on the 26th of March, 1862, I set out to give the peo­ple an ex­po­si­tion of the Twen­ty-third Psalm, which I had giv­en be­fore on three or four oc­ca­sions, but this time I did not get fur­ther than the words “He Lead­eth Me.” Those words took hold of me as they had ne­ver done be­fore, and I saw them in a sig­ni­fi­cance and won­drous beau­ty of which I had ne­ver dreamed. This recording from 1919 is made by Thomas Edison and housed at the Library of Congress. The 23rd psalm is perhaps the best known of them all, importnat in both the Christian and Jewish traditions. It is particularly popular in the world of cinema where it is used in an interesting variety of scenes [...]

Cantonese Opera – White Hibiscus at Night (1920)

- October 12, 2012 in Audio, Audio: 1920s, Audio: Classical, Audio: Traditional, cantonese opera, chinese opera, collections, opera, peony su

The traditional Chinese song “White Hibiscus at Night” sung by Peony Su, a star of the Cantonese Opera during the 1920s and 30s. Learn more here. MP3 Download Internet Archive Link Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

Hawaiian Ciribiribin (1919)

- July 3, 2012 in Audio, Audio: 1910s, Audio: Traditional, Ciribiribin, Frank Ferera, hawaiian music, Louise and Ferera Hawaiian troupe, non-article



Instrumental Hawaiian guitar version by the Louise and Ferera Hawaiian troupe of Alberto Pestalozza’s oft recorded classic “Ciribiribin” originally composed in 1898. Frank Ferera is considered to be the first great star of Hawaiian music. Ferera first visited the mainland United States as part of the Keoki E Awai troupe, and gained fame with the troupe by performing to an estimated 17 million people in a seven-month period at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco in 1915. He married Helen Louise Greenus, daughter of Seattle businessman Albert E. Greenus, and as the Louise and Ferera Hawaiian troupe toured with her throughout the USA, in 1915 signing up to Columbia Records. “Ciribiribin” was to be one of the very last songs they recorded together. In December 12, 1919, Helen Louise mysteriously disappeared while the couple were on board the steamship SS President, from Los Angeles back to their home in Seattle. She had apparently gone on deck for a walk at 4 a.m. and never returned.

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