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W.F. Hooley reads Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address (1898)

- November 19, 2013 in abraham lincoln, Audio, Audio: Pre 1900s, Audio: Speech, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, gettysburg address, Internet Archive, Library of Congress, speech, Underlying Work: PD 50 Years, Underlying Work: PD 70 Years

150 years ago today, on November 19th 1863, President Lincoln delivered his famous speech at the dedication of the Gettysburg Civil War Cemetery, a cemetery set up to house and honour the dead from one of the bloodiest battles of the American Civil War which had taken place four months earlier (the sad aftermath of which is pictured above in a photograph by Timothy H. O’Sullivan). Abraham Lincoln’s carefully crafted address was in fact meant to be secondary to other presentations that day, following on as it did from a two hour speech by the orator Edward Everett. Although Lincoln’s was only just over two minutes long in it’s delivery, it came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history. In it’s short span, Lincoln reiterated the principles of human equality espoused by the Declaration of Independence and proclaimed the Civil War as a struggle for the preservation of the Union sundered by the secession crisis, with “a new birth of freedom,” that would bring true equality to all of its citizens. Lincoln also managed to redefine the Civil War as a struggle not just for the Union, but also for the principle of human equality. […]

Two songs from Verdi’s La Traviata (1910)

- October 10, 2013 in Audio, Audio: 1910s, Audio: Classical, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Internet Archive, la traviata, Lucrezia Bori, opera, Underlying Work: PD 50 Years, Underlying Work: PD 70 Years, verdi

“Ah! fors’è lui” and “Sempre libera” from Act I of Giuseppe Verdi’s La Traviata performed by the Spanish singer Lucrezia Bori in August 1910 for Edison Records. Verdi’s opera in 3 acts has a libretto penned by Francesco Maria Piave and is based on La Dame aux Camélias (1852), a play adapted from the novel by Alexandre Dumas. Housed at: Internet Archive Underlying Work: PD 70 & PD 50 Years | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: VBR MP3 HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your […]

Come Take a Trip in my Airship (1904)

- September 25, 2013 in airship, Audio, Audio: 1900s, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, george evans, hot air balloon, Internet Archive, j.w. myers, Underlying Work: PD 50 Years, Underlying Work: PD 70 Years

Rendition by Welsh-born baritone singer J. W. Myers of a song written and composed in 1904 by fellow countryman George "Honey Boy" Evans. The song would go on to be recorded, with slight variations, by a string of popular musicians including Jonny Cash and more recently Natalie Merchant.

Frank Desprez’s “Lasca” read by Harry E. Humphrey (1920)

- August 22, 2013 in Audio, Audio: 1920s, collections, cowboy, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, frank desprez, Internet Archive, Library of Congress, poetry, rio grande, texas, Underlying Work: PD 70 Years

Edison recording of Harry E. Humphrey reading the English writer Frank Desprez’s most famous poem “Lasca”. This ballad-like piece, first published in a London magazine in 1882, tells the story of a Mexican girl and her cowboy sweetheart caught in a cattle stampede “in Texas down by the Rio Grande”. Housed at: Internet Archive | From: Library of Congress Underlying Work: PD 70 Years | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: VBR MP3 | Ogg Vorbis HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the […]

A Midsummer Schottische

- June 21, 2013 in Audio, Audio: 1920s, Audio: Traditional, collections, Internet Archive, Underlying Work: PD 70 Years

Traditional music for the midsummer “Schottische” dance, known as “Schottis” in Scandinavia where this score is thought to have originated from. The dance is considered by The Oxford Companion to Music to be a kind of slower polka, with continental-European origin (possibly Bohemia). The recording might possibly be of accordion duo Arvid Franzen and Einar Holt recorded in the mid 1920s in New York. Housed at: Internet Archive Underlying Work: PD 70 Years | Digital Copy: Pending Clarification Download: Flac | VBR MP3 | Ogg Vorbis HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the […]

Traditional Italian song with Zampogna and Ciaramella (1920)

- May 13, 2013 in Audio, Audio: 1920s, Audio: Traditional, bagpipes, Ciaramella, collections, italy, Zampogna

A Zampogna is an Italian bagpipe, and a Ciaramella is a small woodwind that plays the higher melody line over the Zampogna’s drone. This combination is often used for traditional Christmas music, as in this circa 1920 recording of a “Novena Di Natale” by uncredited performers. MP3 Download Internet Archive Link HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription! Name: E-mail:

Jelly Roll Morton (1927)

- April 19, 2013 in Audio, collections

A compilation of Jelly Roll Morton’s classic Chicago “Red Hot Peppers” sessions, recorded in 1926-27. Jelly Roll Morton – ragtime and early jazz pianist, bandleader and composer from New Orleans, Louisiana – started out his musical career playing brothels as a teenager, then toured the American South as part of a minstrel show, before settling in Chicago where he started to write songs. Widely recognized as a pivotal figure in early jazz, Morton is perhaps most notable as jazz’s first arranger, proving that a genre rooted in improvisation could retain its essential spirit and characteristics when notated. In 1915, his composition “Jelly Roll Blues” became the first ever published jazz composition. Morton is also notable for naming and popularizing the “Spanish tinge” (habanera rhythm and tresillo), and for writing such standards as “Wolverine Blues”, “Black Bottom Stomp”, and “I Thought I Heard Buddy Bolden Say”, the latter a tribute to New Orleans personalities from the turn of the 19th century to 20th century. (Wikipedia) MP3 Download Internet Archive Link Some songs, if not composed by Jelly Roll Morton, may still be under copyright in certain places. Please check status in your jurisdiction before re-using. HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The [...]

James Mooney’s Ghost Dance Recordings (1894)

- April 2, 2013 in Audio, Audio: Pre 1900s, Audio: Traditional, Cherokee, collections, Ghost Dance, James Mooney, native americans

A series of recordings made by James Mooney in 1894 of different Native American Ghost Dance songs. According to the Library Of Congress notes that accompany the recordings, the performances are probably by Mooney himself and not by Native Americans. Mooney was an ethnographer and self-taught expert on American tribes through his own studies and his careful observation during long residences with different groups, specifically the Cherokee. He did major studies of Southeastern Indians, as well as those on the Great Plains. His most notable works were his ethnographic studies of the Ghost Dance after Sitting Bull’s death in 1890, a widespread 19th-century religious movement among various Native American culture groups. According to the prophet Jack Wilson (Wovoka)’s teachings, proper practice of the dance would reunite the living with the spirits of the dead and bring peace, prosperity, and unity to native peoples throughout the region. MP3 Download Part 1 / Part 2

Slovak Folk Songs (1928/30)

- February 18, 2013 in Adele Keshelak, Audio, Audio: 1930s, Audio: Traditional, collections, folk, Michael Tokarick, Slovak, Slovakia

Adele Keshelak sings three pairs of traditional Rusyn folk songs from Slovakia, recorded in New York on January 30th 1930: Track 1 – “Rusadelina Fialocka” (“Forget me Not”) and “D’Irava Mi Stricha Na Stajni” (“My Pet Horse Was Stolen”); Track 2 – “Na Dolini, V Hustom L’ Is’ I Na Dubi” (“In The Valley, In The Forest”) and “D’Ivki, D’Ivki Hej D’Ivki Na Selo” (“Girls, Girls, to Maidenlane”); Track 3 – “Uz Singl’ujut Zakryvajut Kasarnu” (“They’re Fitting Out The Barracks”) and “Na Oktobra, Na Persoho” (“Joining The Army”). The accordion soloist is Pawel Ondricka. Michael Tokarick provides one of the introductory speaking voices on Track 3; below are two folk songs form his miner’s band. These two Slovak folk dances were recorded in Camden, New Jersey on May 11th 1928. “Minersville Polka” is named after Tokarick’s hometown in the coal mining region of Pennsylvania. “Zelenim Hajecku” (“In The Green Fields”) is a traditional folk tune. MP3 Download: Adele Keshelak / Michael Tokarick Internet Archive link: Adele Keshelak / Michael Tokarick DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote [...]

Adelina Patti singing “The Last Rose of Summer” (1905)

- January 28, 2013 in Adelina Patti, Audio, Audio: 1900s, Audio: Classical, collections, opera, verdi

A recording from 1905 of one of the 19th century’s most famous opera singers Adelina Patti singing “The Last Rose of Summer“, a song based on the poem by Irish poet Thomas Moore. Although the sound quality isn’t great and her voice is past its prime (she was 62 yrs old), through the dust and scratches we can hear glimpses of why Giuseppe Verdi, writing in 1877, described her as being perhaps the finest singer who had ever lived. Patti’s piano accompanist for this recording and others she made at the time, Landon Ronald, recalls his experience working with her: “When the little (gramophone) trumpet gave forth the beautiful tones, she went into ecstasies! She threw kisses into the trumpet and kept on saying, ‘Ah! Mon Dieu! Maintenant je comprends pourquoi je suis Patti! Oh oui! Quelle voix! Quelle artiste! Je comprends tout!’ [Ah! My Lord! Now I understand why I am Patti! Oh yes! What a voice! What an artist! I understand everything!] Her enthusiasm was so naïve and genuine that the fact that she was praising her own voice seemed to us all to be right and proper.” (Wikipedia) MP3 Download Internet Archive Link SIGN UP TO THE [...]