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The Fourth Dimension and the Bible (1922)

- March 13, 2019 in bible, fourth dimension, invisible worlds, mathematical fiction, mathematics, physics, Religion

William Granville's attempt to explain the more mysterious aspects of the Bible through the rigours of pure mathematics.

The Other Lives of Adam and Eve

- September 4, 2014 in adam and eve, bible, book of hours, Curator's Choice, Featured, genesis, Public Domain

Sarah Toulouse, Head of the Rare Books and Cultural Heritage Department at Bibliothèque de Rennes Métropole, explores the mystery behind a couple of strange and unexpected images found in a 15th-century book of hours.

Salome with John The Baptist’s Head at the Rijksmuseum

- June 6, 2013 in bible, collections, decapitation, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Images, Images-16th, Images-17th, john the baptist, king herod, Rijksmuseum, salome, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide

And when a convenient day was come, that Herod on his birthday made a supper to his lords, high captains, and chief estates of Galilee; And when the daughter of the said Herodias came in, and danced, and pleased Herod and them that sat with him, the king said unto the damsel, Ask of me whatsoever thou wilt, and I will give it thee. And he sware unto her, Whatsoever thou shalt ask of me, I will give it thee, unto the half of my kingdom. And she went forth, and said unto her mother, What shall I ask? And she said, The head of John the Baptist. And she came in straightway with haste unto the king, and asked, saying, I will that thou give me by and by in a charger the head of John the Baptist. And the king was exceeding sorry; yet for his oath’s sake, and for their sakes which sat with him, he would not reject her. And immediately the king sent an executioner, and commanded his head to be brought: and he went and beheaded him in the prison, and brought his head in a charger, and gave it to the damsel: and [...]

Bible Symbols (1908)

- May 7, 2013 in bible, christianity, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Internet Archive, Princeton Theological Seminary Library, Religion, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Fiction, Texts: Non-fiction, Texts: Picturebooks, Underlying Work: PD US

Bible symbols, designed and arranged to stimulate a greater interest in the study of the Bible by both young and old. The choicest passages of God’s word put in the fascinating garb of pictures by Frank Beard and others. Text prepared and arranged by Martha Van Marter; 1908; Hertel, Jenkins Co., Chicago. As the subtitle eloquently explains “The choicest passages of God’s word put in the fascinating garb of pictures”. Housed at: Internet Archive | From: Princeton Theological Seminary Library Underlying Work: PD U.S. | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: PDF | Torrent HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest [...]

The Coverdale Bible (1535)

- September 10, 2012 in bible, coverdale, first english translation, non-article, texts, Texts: 16th and older, Texts: Non-fiction


The Bible, compiled by Myles Coverdale; 1535; Merten de Keyser, Antwerp.

The Coverdale Bible, compiled by Myles Coverdale and published in 1535, was the first complete Modern English translation of the Bible (not just the Old Testament or New Testament), and the first complete printed translation into English. The later editions (folio and quarto) published in 1539 were the first complete Bibles printed in England. The place of publication of the 1535 edition was long disputed. The printer was assumed to be either Froschover in Zurich or Cervicornus and Soter (in Cologne or Marburg). In 1997 the printer was identified as Merten de Keyser in Antwerp. The publication was partly financed by Jacobus van Meteren in Antwerp, whose sister-in-law, Adriana de Weyden, married John Rogers. The other backer of was Jacobus van Meteren’s nephew, Leonard Ortels (†1539), father of Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598), the famous humanist geographer and cartographer. Although Coverdale was also involved in the preparation of the Great Bible of 1539, the Coverdale Bible continued to be reprinted. The last of over 20 editions of the whole Bible or its New Testament appeared in 1553. (Wikipedia) [edit]

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The Whole Booke of Psalmes collected into Englishe Metre (1584)

- May 27, 2012 in bible, non-article, psalms, Religion, songs, texts, Texts: 16th and older, Texts: Non-fiction, Texts: Poetry

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The Whole Booke of Psalmes collected into Englishe metre,
by T. Sternhold, W. Whitingham, J. Hopkins, and others, conferred with the Hebrue, with apt notes to them withall; 1584; John Daye, London.


Thomas Sternhold published his first, short collection of nineteen Certayn Psalmes between mid-1547 and early 1549. In December of 1549, his posthumous Al such psalmes of Dauid as Thomas Sternehold … didde in his life time draw into English Metre was printed, containing thirty-seven psalms by Sternhold and, in a separate section at the end, seven psalms by John Hopkins. This collection was taken to the Continent with Protestant exiles during the reign of Mary Tudor, and editors in Geneva both revised the original texts and gradually added more over several editions. In 1562, the publisher John Day brought together most of the psalm versions from the Genevan editions and many new psalms by John Hopkins, Thomas Norton, and John Markant to make up The Whole Booke of Psalmes, Collected into English Meter. In addition to metrical versions of all 150 psalms, the volume included versified versions of the Apostles’ Creed, the Magnificat, and other biblical passages or Christian texts, as well as several non-scriptural versified prayers and a long section of prose prayers largely drawn from the English Forme of Prayers used in Geneva. Sternhold and Hopkins wrote almost all of their Psalms in the “common” or ballad metre. Their versions were quite widely circulated at the time; copies of the Sternhold and Hopkins psalter were bound with many editions of the Geneva Bible, and their Psalms were used in many churches. The Sternhold and Hopkins psalter was also published with music, much of it borrowed from the French Geneva Psalter. (Wikipedia)

Open Library link




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