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Characters and Caricaturas by William Hogarth (1743)

- January 8, 2019 in caricature, cartoons, character, drawing, william hogarth

Hogarth's pictorial defence against claims his art was more about caricatures than characters.

Characters and Caricaturas by William Hogarth (1743)

- January 8, 2019 in caricature, cartoons, character, drawing, william hogarth

Hogarth's pictorial defence against claims his art was more about caricatures than characters.

Ignorant Armies: Private Snafu Goes to War

- March 25, 2015 in animation, army, atomic bomb, cartoons, film, manhattan project, private snafu, propoganda, second world war, war, warner bros., ww2, wwII

Between 1943 and 1945, with the help of Warner Bros.' finest, the U.S. Army produced a series of 27 propaganda cartoons depicting the calamitous adventures of Private Snafu. Mark David Kaufman explores the overarching theme of containment and how one film inadvertently let slip one of the war's greatest secrets.

The Eternal Guffaw: John Leech and The Comic History of Rome

- February 25, 2015 in Art & Illustrations, Books, caricature, cartoons, history of rome, john leech, punch, punch magazine, romans, victorian

At the beginning of the 1850s, two stalwarts from the heart of London-based satiric…

Made in the Trenches: a WW1 Magazine Created by Soldiers (1916)

- July 31, 2014 in cartoons, first world war, humour, magazine, soldiers, war, ww1

A magazine-style book created in 1916 and composed entirely of articles and sketches contributed by British soldiers fighting on the front lines - an eclectic mix of stories, poems, cartoons and, littered at regular intervals throughout, a comic series of encyclopaedic entries for military terms.

Made in the Trenches: a WW1 Magazine Created by Soldiers (1916)

- July 31, 2014 in cartoons, first world war, humour, magazine, soldiers, war, ww1

A magazine-style book created in 1916 and composed entirely of articles and sketches contributed by British soldiers fighting on the front lines - an eclectic mix of stories, poems, cartoons and, littered at regular intervals throughout, a comic series of encyclopaedic entries for military terms.

The Calaveras of José Guadalupe Posada

- November 2, 2012 in Antonio Vanegas Arroyo, calaveras, cartoons, collections, day of the dead, Día de los Muertos, Images, Images-19th, Images-20th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Illustrations, Images-People, José Guadalupe Posada, mexico, skeletons, skulls

José Guadalupe Posada (1851–1913) was a Mexican illustrator known for his satirical and politically acute calaveras. Deriving from the Spanish word for ‘skulls’, these calaveras were illustrations featuring skeletons which would, after Posada’s death, become closely associated with the mexican holiday Día de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead. Most of these calaveras were published by the press of Antonio Vanegas Arroyo which produced inexpensive literature for the lower classes, including thousands of satirical broadsides which Posada illustrated. Through this focus on mortality Vanegas Arroyo and Posada satirised many poignant issues of the day, in particular the details of bourgeois life and the dictatorship of Porfirio Díaz. On January 20th 1913, 3 years after the start of the Mexican Revolution, José Guadalupe Posada died at his home in obscurity. He was penniless and buried in an unmarked grave. It was only years later in the 1920s that his work became recognised on a national and international level after it was championed by the French ex-patriot artist Jean Charlot who described Posada as “printmaker to the Mexican people”. (All images taken from the Library of Congress). Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your [...]