You are browsing the archive for charts.

George Mayerle’s Eye Test Chart (ca. 1907)

- December 12, 2017 in charts, diagrams, eye charts, eyes, george mayerle, graphic design, optometry, symbols

This fantastic eye chart — measuring 22 by 28 inches with a positive version on one side and negative on the other — is the work of German optometrist and American Optometric Association member George Mayerle, who was working in San Francisco at end of the nineteenth century, just when optometry was beginning to professionalise. […]

George Mayerle’s Eye Test Chart (ca. 1907)

- December 12, 2017 in charts, diagrams, eye charts, eyes, george mayerle, graphic design, optometry, symbols

This fantastic eye chart — measuring 22 by 28 inches with a positive version on one side and negative on the other — is the work of German optometrist and American Optometric Association member George Mayerle, who was working in San Francisco at end of the nineteenth century, just when optometry was beginning to professionalise. […]

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Hand-Drawn Infographics of African-American Life (1900)

- February 7, 2017 in 1900 World's Fair in Paris, 19th-century infographics, african-american, charts, civil rights, data visualisation, graphic design, infographics, paris exhibition, race, sociology, The Exhibit of American Negroes, vintage infographics, W. E. B. Du Bois

Visually dazzling set of hand-drawn charts created by Du Bois, condensing an enormous amount of data on African-American life into aesthetically daring and easily digestible visualisations.

كيفية اختيار الرسم البياني المناسب

- July 4, 2015 in Aware, charts, datavis, graphs

كيفية اختيار الرسم البياني المناسب

- July 4, 2015 in Aware, charts, datavis, graphs

كيفية اختيار الرسم البياني المناسب

- July 4, 2015 in Aware, charts, datavis, graphs

كيفية اختيار الرسم البياني المناسب

- July 4, 2015 in Aware, charts, datavis, graphs

Data Roundup, 3 December

- December 3, 2013 in aids, australia, bushfire, charts, climate change, course, Data, Data Roundup, gender, inequality, infographics, javascript, Mapping, november, online, Roundup, top 5, Tutorial, tweets, World Bank

A course on online mapping, new visualization software, corruption perceptions data, bushfires in Australia through interactive maps, climate change effects infographics, the top 5 tweets of November in data visualization, a gift list for data lovers.

United Nations Photo – Climate Change Effects in Island Nation of Kiribati

Tools, Events, Courses If you are a wannabe mapper and you need to acquire skills to manage your digital exploration tools you might be interested in registering at the “Online mapping for beginner” course of CartoDB starting on December the 3rd. Hurry up: only few places left! Daniel Smilkov, Deepak Jagdish and César Hidalgo are three MIT students that developed a visualization tool called Immersion. Immersion helps you visualizing your network of e-mail contacts using only “From”, “To”, “Cc” without taking into account any kind of content. JavaScript is one of the most common programming language frequently used to create beautiful visualizations. Follow this tutorial from dry.ly if you want to learn it bypassing D3.js. Practice makes perfect! Data Stories Yesterday, Transparency International launched it’s annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) ranking countries according to perceived levels of corruption. Have a look at the results and see how your country ranks. Everyone knows what a bar chart is but have you ever heard about trilinear plots? This post from Alberto Cairo introduces a short consideration on new forms of data representations and on when to break conventions in information design. The goal of the Digital Methods Initiative of the Amsterdam University is to map and analyze causes, effects and possible future scenarios deriving from climate change. As part of this project, the students from Density Design Research Lab wrote a wonderful post outlining their visual design take on climate change. Gender inequality is one of those big issues which varies enormously from country to country. If you are wondering what countries have the worst gender gap a look at the map published on the Slate Magazine by Jamie Zimmerman, Nicole Tosh, and Nick McClellan. There are a lot of visualizations you can make from data coming from social networks, especially from those coming from the biggest one: Facebook. Take a minute to see those posted in this curious article from Armin Grossenbacher: “Visualising (not so) Big Data”. In Australia bushfires occur frequently. Look at the amazing interactive story that The Guardian published on their history, showing maps with data on temperatures, hectares of land burnt and number of properties damaged. Not everyone knows that we just passed the World Aids Day on the first of December. Tariq Khokhar reminds us the global situation of the disease in this article from the World Bank Data Blog. Data Sources Datavisualization.fr extracted the list of the 5 most influential tweets of November containing the hashtag #dataviz from a database of about 10.100 posts. Read it here and see who did best. Christimas is getting closer. If you need some good suggestions on what to buy to your friends and parents take a moment to read the FlowingData Gift Guide and you’ll find some interesting data-gifts for your data-lovers. flattr this!

Data Roundup, 11 November

- November 11, 2013 in charts, data journalism school, Data Roundup, excel, italy, politicians, strata conference

A chart of Excel charts, the misuse of statistics by politicians, the Data Journalism School edition IV in Italy, a new perspective on depression, a Spanish job board for data addicted around the world, Google data tools in case of natural disasters.

Patrick Hoesly – Pie Chart Art. Seamless Pattern


Tools, Events, Courses If you need a quick guide on which should be the most appropriate chart to use in your everyday data analysis, then check the recently published Jorge Camoes’ Classification of chart types which presents all kind of graphs that can only be made in Excel. Manipulating data for its own sake is, unfortunately, a common practice of our politicians. If you are curious about how do they do it you’d better not miss the Friday lunchtime lecture of the executive director of the Royal Statistical Society Hetan Shah on “How politicians lie with data”. The event is free and takes place at the Open Data Institute in London. In Italy, the Foundation and ISTAT just announced the fourth edition of the Data Journalism School. It’s a three-day introduction to the concepts, methods and best practices of journalism done with statistics. It will be from 17 to 19 December but there are only 18 places available and if you want to be among the participants you’d better register now. After New York, on Monday 11 the Strata Conference moves to London for its European chapter. “Open Data” is one of the eight topics of the event. Find out the program and the keynote speakers! Data Stories Mark Rice-Oxley published on the Guardian Data Blog an interesting point of view on depression. Maps and charts show depressive disorders sorted by country, sex and age group. If you are curious about the charateristics and distribution of the disease, have a look at “Where in the world are people most depressed?”. In San Diego, California, they are testing the Tactical Identification System: a new way to identify individuals through a facial recognition mechanism based on photo-databases. See how it works in this nice infographic of the Center for Investigative Reporting. Data Sources The data revolution we are witnessing is increasingly expanding the number of jobs in this field. If you just graduated from university or you simply want to change your career path, we suggest you to monitor the Big Data Spain Job Board, available in English and Spanish. There are more than 2000 vacancies you may apply for! Read about the power of geo-data and maps in situations of crisis and natural disaster in Adam Mann’s article “Mapping Disasters Like Typhoon Haiyan for First Responders” on Wired MapLab. Mann introduces some important tools Google.org developed to help people whose homes have been hit by hurricanes, earthquakes or floods. flattr this!