You are browsing the archive for china.

Yvette Borup Andrews: Photographing Central Asia

- January 10, 2018 in central asia, china, ethnography, expeditions, explorers, field photography, mongolia, Photography, real-life indiana jones, roy chapman andrews, tibet, visual anthropology, yvette borup andrews

Although often overshadowed by the escapades of her more famous husband (said by some to be the real-life inspiration for Indiana Jones), the photographs taken by Yvette Borup Andrews on their first expeditions through Central Asia stand today as a compelling contribution to early visual anthropology. Lydia Pyne looks at the story and impact of this unique body of images.

Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio (1880)

- November 14, 2017 in china, chinese literature, fairytales, folklore, folktales, ghosts, spirits

First English translation of Pu Songling's collection of classical Chinese stories, including magical pear trees, thimble-sized babies, ghostly cities, and mean spirited daughters-in-law being turned into pigs.

The Chinese Fairy Book (1921)

- November 28, 2013 in California Digital Library, china, chinese fairy tales, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, fairy tales, fairytales, Internet Archive, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Fairytales, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide

A book compiling seventy-four traditional Chinese folk takes, making, as the translator notes, "probably the most comprehensive and varied collection of oriental fairy tales ever made available for American readers".

Data Roundup, 19 November

- November 19, 2013 in censorship, china, Data Roundup, demography, excel spreadsheet, tow center

Lessons and workshops on data journalism in Europe and US, winners and losers of the after-crisis monetary policy, Chinese government censorship on the internet, the Bourbon distilleries tree, what does life expectancy mean in statistics, how to eliminate headings with more than one row in Excel.

Herve “Setaou” Bry – Tian An Men Patrol

Tools, Events, Courses On Wednesday the 20th,from 4pm to 6pm, while drinking tea, you might also listen to an interesting lesson on data journalism with two experts of the field: Brian Abelson, data scientist at the New York Times, and Amanda Zamora, senior engagement editor at ProPublica. The event will be held at the prestigious Columbia Univeristy Tow Center for Digital Journalism. Everyone knows Alberto Cairo’s famous massive online courses, but for those of you who are in the Netherlands, you now have the opportunity to attend one of his lecture and to do it live! On Friday 22, don’t miss the appointment with “Visualizing Information: The Insightful Art”, the one-day workshop on how to draw effective data visualizations. Data Stories Since the 2007 economic crisis, there hasn’t been a day without someone arguing about interest rates, net incomes, GDP and taxes. A few days ago, Emily Cadman published an article on the Financial Times Data Blog which gives you accurate details on who wins and who loses from the monetary policies undertaken by governments in the last years. If you are curious, read “Estimating the cost of QE”. Bourbon has a long long tradition in Kentucky, but who produces it? Which are the biggest distilleries? And, above all, who owns those distilleries? Check it out in the Bourbon Family Tree: a nice GQ infographic by Colin Spoleman. If you haven’t already done it, let me invite you to read another milestone of interactive journalism from ProPublica: “China’s Memory Hole”. With the help of several Mandarin interpreters, ProPublica’s team monitored Sina Weibo (the Chinese version of Twitter) for 6 months. From a huge dataset of about 80,000 messages and photos, they stored and selected all the posts which were removed from the site by the national censorship! Data Sources Statistics is the core of every data analysis. Before visualizing them, it’s fundamental to learn how certain indexes and metrics are calculated. For those of you passionate about demography, you’d better read what Emi Suzuki and Neil Fantom say in “What does ‘life expectancy at birth’ really mean?” on the World Bank Data Blog. You might discover (or maybe just remind) that living in a country with a life expectancy of 80 years doesn’t necessarily mean that each of its citizens will get octogenarian before dying! Paul Bradshaw has been on the frontline of data journalism since newsrooms started extracting stories from numbers. If you are desperately trying to clean an Excel spreadsheet with a multiple rows heading, keep calm and read his easy step-by-step guide on “How to: clean up spreadsheet headings that run across multiple rows using Open Refine”. flattr this!

An Account of a Chinese Cabinet (1753)

- October 23, 2013 in british museum, cabinet of curiosties, china, chinese cabinet, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, hans sloane, Internet Archive, Royal Society, texts, Texts: 18th, Texts: Non-fiction, The Royal Society, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide

“A Further Account of What Was Contain’d in the Chinese Cabinet”, by Hans Sloane, M. D. from Philosophical Transactions, January 1753; London. An account by Sir Hans Sloane detailing the contents of a Chinese cabinet (which includes a “Sea Horse Tooth”) procured by a Mr Buckley during travels in China. A physician by trade Sloane was also an avid collector of natural curiosities and upon his death, bequeathed the entirety of his collection to the nation and, together with George II’s royal library, it was opened to the public as the British Museum in 1759. A note at the end of this account, which appears in the January 1753 accounts of the Royal Society (the same month that Sloane would pass away), praises the collecting of Mr Buckley: It were to be wished other travellers into Foreign parts would make such enquiries (as Mr Buckly [sic] who sent these to the Royal Society has done) into the Instruments and Materials made use of in the places where they come, that are any manner of way for the Benefit or innocent delight of Mankind, that we may content our selves with our own Inventions, where we go beyond them, and imitate […]

Examples of Chinese Ornament (1867)

- November 21, 2012 in china, chinese design, collections, decoration, design, Images, Images-19th, Images-Painting, Images: Miscellaneous, pattern

A selection from the 100 plates featured in the book Examples of Chinese ornament selected from objects in the South Kensington museum and other collections (1867) by Owen Jones. From the Preface: The late war in China, and the Ti-ping rebellion, by the destruction and sacking of many public buildings, has caused the introduction to Europe of a great number of truly magnificent works of Ornamental Art, of a character which had been rarely seen before that period, and which are remarkable, not only for the perfection and skill shown in the technical processes, but also for the beauty and harmony of the colouring, and general perfection of the ornamentation. In the following Plates I have gathered together as great a variety of these new styles of Ornament as have come within my reach, and I trust that no important phase of this Art has escaped me. I have had the advantage of access to the National Collection at South Kensington and the unrivalled collection of Alfred Morrison, Esq., of Fonthill, who has secured the finest specimens from time to time, as they have appeared in this country. From the collection of Louis Huth, Esq., exhibited in South Kensington, and [...]

Examples of Chinese Ornament (1867)

- November 21, 2012 in china, chinese design, collections, decoration, design, Images, Images-19th, Images-Painting, Images: Miscellaneous, pattern

A selection from the 100 plates featured in the book Examples of Chinese ornament selected from objects in the South Kensington museum and other collections (1867) by Owen Jones. From the Preface: The late war in China, and the Ti-ping rebellion, by the destruction and sacking of many public buildings, has caused the introduction to Europe of a great number of truly magnificent works of Ornamental Art, of a character which had been rarely seen before that period, and which are remarkable, not only for the perfection and skill shown in the technical processes, but also for the beauty and harmony of the colouring, and general perfection of the ornamentation. In the following Plates I have gathered together as great a variety of these new styles of Ornament as have come within my reach, and I trust that no important phase of this Art has escaped me. I have had the advantage of access to the National Collection at South Kensington and the unrivalled collection of Alfred Morrison, Esq., of Fonthill, who has secured the finest specimens from time to time, as they have appeared in this country. From the collection of Louis Huth, Esq., exhibited in South Kensington, and [...]

Spring Morning in the Han Palace (17th.c)

- September 26, 2012 in china, chinese art, han palace, Images, Images-17th, Images-Landscapes, Images-People, ming dynasty, non-article

(Image above is very long, scroll to the right within the image to see the whole thing) A 17th century copy of Spring Morning in the Han Palace, a famous handscroll by the 16th century Ming Dynasty artist Qiu Ying [Ch'iu Ying]. It depicts imperial life at its most idyllic. During the years of the Qing [Ch'ing] Dynasty, copies such of this of Qiu Ying’s painting were popular because they were considered an excellent guide to elegant behaviour. (Above image stitched together from images, below, on Wikimedia Commons donated by Walter Art Museum). Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!