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Loie Fuller and the Serpentine

- November 6, 2019 in choreography, Culture & History, dance, dancing, Drama, Loie Fuller, serpentine

With her "serpentine dance" — a show of swirling silk and rainbow lights — Loie Fuller became one of the most celebrated dancers of the fin de siècle. Rhonda K. Garelick explores Fuller’s unlikely stardom and how her beguiling art played out onstage the era's newly blurred boundaries between human and machine.

Collection of Dances in Choreography Notation (1700)

- May 2, 2012 in choreography, dance, Images, Images-17th, Images-18th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Science, Images: Miscellaneous, Music, non-article, notation

Images extracted from the latter half of Choregraphie, a book first published in 1700 which details a dance notation system invented by Raoul-Auger Feuillet which revolutionised the dance world. The system indicates the placement of the feet and six basic leg movements: plié, releveé, sauté, cabriole, tombé, and glissé. Changes of body direction and numerous ornamentations of the legs and arms are also part of the system which is based on tract drawings that trace the pattern of the dance. Additionally, bar lines in the dance score correspond to bar lines in the music score. Signs written on the right or left hand side of the tract indicate the steps. Voltaire ranked the invention as one of the “achievements of his day” and Denis Diderot devoted ten pages to the subject in his Encylopdédie.

The rest of the book, including a beautifully illustrated explanation (in French) of the notation system, can be viewed here in our Texts collection.













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Choregraphie (1701)

- May 1, 2012 in choreography, non-article, notation, texts, Texts: 18th, Texts: Miscellaneous, Texts: Non-fiction, Texts: Picturebooks, Texts: Science

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Choregraphie, ou, L’art de décrire la dance, par caracteres, figures, et signes démonstratifs avec lesquels on apprend facilement de soy-même toutes sortes de dances: ouvrage tres-utile aux maîtres à dancer & à toutes les personnes qui s’appliquent à la dance, by M. Feuillet, maître de dance; 1701; Chez l’auteur et chez Michel Brunet, Paris.

First published in 1700, this manual details a dance notation system invented by Raoul-Auger Feuillet which revolutionised the dance world. The system indicates the placement of the feet and six basic leg movements: plié, releveé, sauté, cabriole, tombé, and glissé. Changes of body direction and numerous ornamentations of the legs and arms are also part of the system which is based on tract drawings that trace the pattern of the dance. Additionally, bar lines in the dance score correspond to bar lines in the music score. Signs written on the right or left hand side of the tract indicate the steps. Voltaire ranked the invention as one of the “achievements of his day” and Denis Diderot devoted ten pages to the subject in his Encylopdédie. The book was translated into English by John Weaver in 1706 under the title Orchesography. Or the Art of Dancing.

See extracted images from the second half of the book over in our Images collection.

Open Library link




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  • <img src="http://publicdomainreview.org/wp-content/plugins/category-grid-view-gallery/includes/timthumb.php?src=http://publicdomainreview.org/2012/05/01/choregraphie-1701/http%3A//publicdomainreview.org/files/2011/08/frenchfairytales.jpg&h=200&w=200&zc=1&q=75%22 alt="Old French Fairytales (1920) " title="Old French Fairytales (1920) "/>






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