You are browsing the archive for christmas.

Schneider Von Groot’s Christmas Dream (1885)

- December 12, 2018 in alcohol, christmas, demons, devils, dreams, drinking, schnapps, temperance, temperance movement

Born of the temperance movement, this poem dramatises the ills of drinking schnapps, through one man’s bloody battle with thousands of intoxicated demons.

Schneider Von Groot’s Christmas Dream (1885)

- December 12, 2018 in alcohol, christmas, demons, devils, dreams, drinking, schnapps, temperance, temperance movement

Born of the temperance movement, this poem dramatises the ills of drinking schnapps, through one man’s bloody battle with thousands of intoxicated demons.

Silent Night (1912)

- September 8, 2016 in carol, christmas, silent night

Rendition of the Christmas favourite, by Elizabeth Spencer, Harry Anthony and James F. Harrison.

Silent Night (1912)

- September 8, 2016 in carol, christmas, silent night

Rendition of the Christmas favourite, by Elizabeth Spencer, Harry Anthony and James F. Harrison.

Festive Greetings From Open Knowledge Ireland

- December 31, 2015 in 2016, christmas, Events, Hospital Waiting List, new year, OKFN Ireland, Open Knowledge Ireland

We, Open Knowledge Ireland, would like to send all our supporters a big “Thank you” for your help in the last year. By participating in our events, speaking up in support for openness and transparency, and even by donating time, effort or money to us, you helped to make a difference. 2015 has brought some important new developments to Ireland. After years of lobbying, even going up as high as the EU, Ireland government finally started changing the  public sector information re-use licenses to open ones [http://www.per.gov.ie/en/minister-howlin-signs-regulations-to-enhance-the-rights-of-citizens-and-businesses-to-re-use-public-sector-information/].
News and Events
Featured Events 
Open Health Data Nigth @Science gallery
Important Dates
Wednesday, 20th January
While up until some months ago, commercial re-use of public data was widely prohibited, now everyone can create exciting new stuff based on the data that we all helped to pay for with our taxes, making Ireland’s public data real Open Data. We will of course continue our efforts to guide and counsel the public authorities on this topic, helping (and sometimes pushing them) forward to open up more data that is of importance for Ireland’s citizens. [http://openknowledge.ie/irish-open-data-wishlist-ireland-falling-behind-its-open-data-promises-and-international-best-practice/]Speaking of Open Data, we must admit that we have not been successful enough with our fight re-establish trust in Ireland’s charity sector by opening up Ireland’s charity data in 2015. While we still believe that it is the wrong way to spend millions of euros in a private company to digitize and re-sell charity budget data [http://openknowledge.ie/open-data-ireland-charity-transparency/], instead of simply creating an open and easy to use data base for a small percentage of these costs [http://openknowledge.ie/opening-up-charities/], we accept that the Irish media may not seem this topic important enough to pick it up.We will continue with our efforts to open up more Irish Health Data [http://openknowledge.ie/projects/open-hospital-waiting-list/]. We were able to join forces with Wikimedia Ireland to bring to you a special Open Health Data evening in the science gallery this January 20th. Please join us for discussions there:

OPEN HEALTH DATA NIGHT @ SCIENCE GALLERY

JANUARY 20th (18:30-20:00), doors open at 18:00 REGISTER ON https://ti.to/open-knowledge-ireland/OPEN-HEALTH-DATA-NIGHT-at-SCIENCE-GALLERY

Support us!

Please help us continue our work in 2016! We accept all kind of help, giving us your time and participation in our events, hosting space for events or virtual space for our web pages. We also accept bitcoins and various kinds of money, so supporting our fight for openness and transparency is just a click away: http://openknowledge.ie/donate/ That leaves us just one more thing to wish for:

Merry Christmas And A Happy New Year 2016!

Stereoscopic Victorian Christmas GIFs

- December 22, 2013 in Animated GIFs, christmas, collections, Library of Congress, santa, stereo, stereographs, victorian

A series of animated GIFs made from Victorian christmas stereographs found in the Library of Congress.

Christmas Festive Bonanza Digest

- December 22, 2012 in christmas, collections

To celebrate the festive season we have put together, just for you our beloved readers, a little Christmas digest including all our festive content from this year and last. Enjoy! Diary Days from Christmas Past With December 25th fast approaching we have put together a little collection of entries for Christmas Day from an eclectic mix of different diaries spanning five centuries, from 1599 to 1918. Amid famed diarists such as the wife-beating Samuel Pepys, the distinctly non-festive John Adams, and the rhapsodic Thoreau, there are a sprinkling of daily jottings from relative unknowns – many speaking apart from loved ones, at war, sea or in foreign climes.Read More » A Pictorial History of Santa Claus Contrary to what many believe, Santa Claus as we know him today – sleigh riding, gift-giving, rotund and white bearded with his distinctive red suit trimmed with white fur – was not the creation of the Coca Cola Company. We’ve put together a little pictorial guide showing his evolvement through the ages. Read More » Scrooge, or, Marley’s Ghost (1901) Scrooge, or, Marley’s Ghost, directed by Walter R. Booth, is the oldest known film adaptation of Charles Dickens’ 1843 novel A Christmas Carol – [...]

A Christmas Sermon by Robert Louis Stevenson (1900)

- December 21, 2012 in christmas, collections, Religion, robert louis stevenson, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Non-fiction

A Christmas Sermon, by Robert Louis Stevenson; 1900; C. Scribner’s Sons, New York. A Christmas Sermon by Robert Louis Stevenson written while he convalesced from a lung ailment at Lake Sarnac in the winter of 1887. In the short text he meditates on the questions of death, morality and man’s main task in life which he concludes is “To be honest, to be kind — to earn a little and to spend a little less, to make upon the whole a family happier for his presence.” The piece was to be published in Scribner’s magazine the following December. This pamphlet edition is from 1900, published 6 years after Stevenson’s death at the age of just 44. The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the Library of Congress. Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

A Christmas Sermon by Robert Louis Stevenson (1900)

- December 21, 2012 in christmas, collections, morality, Religion, robert louis stevenson, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Non-fiction

A Christmas Sermon, by Robert Louis Stevenson; 1900; C. Scribner’s Sons, New York. A Christmas Sermon by Robert Louis Stevenson written while he convalesced from a lung ailment at Lake Sarnac in the winter of 1887. In the short text he meditates on the questions of death, morality and man’s main task in life which he concludes is “To be honest, to be kind — to earn a little and to spend a little less, to make upon the whole a family happier for his presence.” The piece was to be published in Scribner’s magazine the following December. This pamphlet edition is from 1900, published 6 years after Stevenson’s death at the age of just 44. The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the Library of Congress. Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus (1897)

- December 21, 2012 in christmas, collections, santa claus, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Non-fiction

In 1897, Dr. Philip O’Hanlon, a coroner’s assistant on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, was asked a question by his then eight-year-old daughter, Virginia, which many a parent has been asked before: whether Santa Claus really exists. O’Hanlon deferred. He suggested Virginia wrote asking the question to one of New York’s most prominent newspapers at the time, The Sun, assuring her that “If you see it in The Sun, it’s so.” Dear Editor: I am 8 years old. Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus. Papa says, ‘If you see it in The Sun it’s so.’ Please tell me the truth; is there a Santa Claus? The response to Virginia’s letter by one of the paper’s editors, Francis Pharcellus Church, remains the most reprinted editorial ever to run in any newspaper in the English language and found itself the subject of books, a film and television series. In his response Church goes beyond a simple “yes of course” to explore the philosophical issues behind Virginia’s request to tell her “the truth” and in the process lampoon a certain skepticism which he had found rife in American society since the suffering of the Civil War. His message in [...]