You are browsing the archive for code for america.

CKANconUS and Code for America Summit: some thoughts about the important questions

- June 20, 2018 in ckan, code for america, Events, OK US, USA

It’s been a few weeks after CKANConUS and the seventh Code for America Summit took place in Oakland. As always, it was a great place to meet old friends and new faces of technologists, policy experts, government innovators in the U.S. In this blogpost I share some of the experience of attending these two conferences and a few thoughts I’ve been ruminating about the discussions that happened, and more importantly, those that didn’t happen. CKAN is an open source open data portal platform that Open Knowledge International developed several years ago. It has been used and reused by many governments and civil society organizations around the world. For CKANconUS, the OK US group, led by Joel Natividad organized a one day event with different users and implementers of CKAN around the United States. We had the California based LA Counts, gathering data from the 88 cities in the County of Los Angeles; the California Data Collaborative working to improve water management decisions. We also had some interesting presentations from the GreenInfo Network and the California Natural Resources Agency. And we had the chance to hear about the awesome process of the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center to choose CKAN as its platform and how they maintain the project (presentation included LEGOs in every slide). On the more technical side, David Read, Ian Ward and our own Adrià Mercader talked about the new versions of CKAN, the Express Loader and the Technical Roadmap for CKAN, 11 years after its development started. You can view the slides by Adrià Mercader on the CKAN Technical Roadmap overview here. We closed with some great lightning talks about datamirror.org to ensure access to federal research data and Human Centered Design and what Amanda Damewood learned about working in government in improving these processes. The next two days in the Code for America Summit were full of interesting talks about building tools, innovating in our processes and making government work for people in a better way. There were some interesting keynote speakers as well as breakout sessions where we discussed the process to build certain projects and how we can rethink how we engage in our communities. I would like highlight two mainstage talks about collaboration (or the difficulty of such) between government and civil society. The first is a talk and panel about disasters in Puerto Rico, Houston and cities in Florida, where some key points were raised about the importance of having accurate, verifiable and usable information in these cases, as well as the importance of having a network of people who are willing to help their peers. The second is the presentation Code for Asheville presented, regarding their issues with homelessness and police data. This isn’t necessarily what you would call a success story but Sabrah n’haRaven made a great point about working with social issues: “Trust effective communities to understand their own problems”. This may sound like a given in the work we do when working with data and building things with it, but it’s something that we need to keep in mind. Using this line of thought, it seems crucial to keep these conversations going. We need to understand our communities, be aware that there are policies that go against the rights of people to live a fulfilling life and we need to change that. I hope for the next CfA Summit and CKANConUS we can try to find some answers to these questions collectively.

CKANconUS and Code for America Summit: some thoughts about the important questions

- June 20, 2018 in ckan, code for america, Events, OK US, USA

It’s been a few weeks after CKANConUS and the seventh Code for America Summit took place in Oakland. As always, it was a great place to meet old friends and new faces of technologists, policy experts, government innovators in the U.S. In this blogpost I share some of the experience of attending these two conferences and a few thoughts I’ve been ruminating about the discussions that happened, and more importantly, those that didn’t happen. CKAN is an open source open data portal platform that Open Knowledge International developed several years ago. It has been used and reused by many governments and civil society organizations around the world. For CKANconUS, the OK US group, led by Joel Natividad organized a one day event with different users and implementers of CKAN around the United States. We had the California based LA Counts, gathering data from the 88 cities in the County of Los Angeles; the California Data Collaborative working to improve water management decisions. We also had some interesting presentations from the GreenInfo Network and the California Natural Resources Agency. And we had the chance to hear about the awesome process of the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center to choose CKAN as its platform and how they maintain the project (presentation included LEGOs in every slide). On the more technical side, David Read, Ian Ward and our own Adrià Mercader talked about the new versions of CKAN, the Express Loader and the Technical Roadmap for CKAN, 11 years after its development started. You can view the slides by Adrià Mercader on the CKAN Technical Roadmap overview here. We closed with some great lightning talks about datamirror.org to ensure access to federal research data and Human Centered Design and what Amanda Damewood learned about working in government in improving these processes. The next two days in the Code for America Summit were full of interesting talks about building tools, innovating in our processes and making government work for people in a better way. There were some interesting keynote speakers as well as breakout sessions where we discussed the process to build certain projects and how we can rethink how we engage in our communities. I would like highlight two mainstage talks about collaboration (or the difficulty of such) between government and civil society. The first is a talk and panel about disasters in Puerto Rico, Houston and cities in Florida, where some key points were raised about the importance of having accurate, verifiable and usable information in these cases, as well as the importance of having a network of people who are willing to help their peers. The second is the presentation Code for Asheville presented, regarding their issues with homelessness and police data. This isn’t necessarily what you would call a success story but Sabrah n’haRaven made a great point about working with social issues: “Trust effective communities to understand their own problems”. This may sound like a given in the work we do when working with data and building things with it, but it’s something that we need to keep in mind. Using this line of thought, it seems crucial to keep these conversations going. We need to understand our communities, be aware that there are policies that go against the rights of people to live a fulfilling life and we need to change that. I hope for the next CfA Summit and CKANConUS we can try to find some answers to these questions collectively.

Giselle Sperber, Code for America Fellow

- March 19, 2015 in chattanooga, code for america, event, Government data, Melbourne, opendata

Tonight we heard from Giselle Sperber, 2014 Code for America fellow who’s finishing up a brief stint with the Victorian Government. Code for America is a pretty remarkable non-profit expanding across the US, and now the world. The model pairs teams of three (usually a designer, a front-end developer, and a database/back end developer) with local governments who are embracing openness and trying to better serve their citizens. Cities bid for the right to receive these fellowship teams, and potential fellows similarly have to go through a selection process. The fellows work on incredibly varied projects, from redesigning crappy forms, to creating GTFS feeds from public transport data, to building Discover BPS, an easy to use school selection system for parents. Giselle, a user experience designer/researcher, was working with Chattanooga, Tennessee, but based in San Francisco, where CfA also provides training and ongoing support to fellows. Most recently she’s been embedded with the Victorian Government’s Department of Premier and Cabinet, working on a potential redesign of the vic.gov.au platform. There’s lots of information and the odd YouTube video about Giselle’s activities at the Chattanooga Code for America page. If you’re interested in helping get this model working in Australia, get in touch with codeforaustralia.org. Giselle’s slides: “Working Together Works

从开放数据到开放发展(四) 城市 X 开放 X 数据

- January 8, 2014 in code for america, Featured, fixmystreet, open311, streetmix, 公民创新, 城市规划, 开放发展, 观点

把整个城市搬上 GitHub:开源芝加哥

GitHub 是一个代码托管网站,但与过往许许多多代码托管网站不同的地方在于其提供了充分「开放」的工作模式。它鼓励任何人对一个公开的代码库进行「复制」(fork) 从而对原有代码进行修改、扩展、改正,同时,它也充分鼓励任何人都参与进一个项目的讨论,你可以新开一个「工单」来提出问题,汇报 Bug,建议新增功能。正是这样「开放」的模式使其成为程序员届最重要的工具和社区。 而在2013年2月,芝加哥市政府决定将它们整个城市的数据上传至 GitHub,并鼓励所有人来「复制」它们的数据,帮助它们提升数据的质量或者利用这些数据作出创新的应用。这无疑是自2009年奥巴马政府宣布全国开展开放数据运动以来,开放数据领域内最大的壮举。你或许会问为什么这非常重要?这些数据不是或多或少已经开放在 data.gov 或者芝加哥市的开放数据门户上了吗? 事实上,如果说将数据放在开放门户提供大家下载是开放数据1.0,那么将数据放在 GitHub 这样一个鼓励开放协作的平台就是进入了开放数据 2.0。 开放协作使得数据能够像代码一样被「复制」并由社区来提升质量,而这就提供了一个「发布者-使用者」之间的双向通道来进一步帮助城市管理者将数据化为真正有用的资源,这是单单将数据开放下载所不能达到的效果。

开放的城市服务热线:从 FixMyStreet 到 Open311

FixMyStreet

FixMyStreet 截图

FixMyStreet 是英国民间非营利机构 MySociety 推出的第一款产品,也是首款在城市服务领域内引入开放模型的应用。往常,对于公共设施比如路面、街道路灯等的报修以及其他城市服务的投诉都只是单向的、单人的沟通,这也就造成了问题的重复投诉率高、处理进度不透明等问题。 而 FixMyStreet 首次引入了开放模型将单向、单人的沟通改造成双向、多人的沟通模式,允许多人集中地多一个问题进行投诉,并提供平台对有关部门的处理进度进行追踪。比如,上图中显示的就是英国南安普敦市市民向市政府投诉有路障倒地阻碍了人行道,地图上标记了准确的问题地点,次日早上市府便立刻回复说该问题已登记在案,并且在问题解决后,立刻再次回复让公众知情。

这样的开放模型在解决城市服务问题中有着众多的优点:首先,这样的开放模型更容易吸引人去参与进城市问题的投诉中。对于如今的手机党、微博党而言,可能简单的在地图上点点,写上两句话,要比起一本正经拨打热线电话来的更容易。其次,沟通成本会更低。传统的热线电话方式,使得单一问题的投诉重复率大大增加,而开放模式则使得单一问题能够由多人同时参与,这也就减轻了相关部门在接受问题投诉上所付出的时间和人力成本,避免资源浪费在同一问题上。最后,采用开放模型是政府树立良好形象的极佳途径。开放模型不仅仅是将工作流程开放,允许更多民众参与,更是对信息的透明化:政府何时受理该问题,是否持续跟进问题,是否已解决问题等等信息都通过一个透明化的渠道让公众知情,而这也将能更好的塑造一个透明、公开的政府形象。 FixMyStreet 的成功,顿时引爆了一场民间对城市服务热线改造的风潮。各种类型的类似产品在各个国家、城市相继推出,民众的参与热情一度高涨,但随之产生的问题也越来越多。首先,民间自行开发的类似产品虽然可以吸引到民众的参与,但是有时候却无法保证政府的参与。其次,由于产品过多,政府不可能在所有产品上同时跟进问题,这反而降低了政府效率。最后,因为每个人采用的产品很可能不同,因此投诉的重复率问题又回来了,因为民众的注意力被不同产品分散了。
wired_nyc_311

原图是Wired于2010年制作的关于纽约 311 热线电话数据的时序分析图

为了解决这些问题,Open311 诞生了。 Open311 其本身并不是一个新的App,而是一个供第三方应用与政府的城市服务热线进行数据交换的 API 标准。它所制定的标准确保了各个地方政府采用统一的接口来供第三方产品使用,这样就确保了所有第三方应用都能通过统一的渠道将数据反馈到政府机构。同时第三方应用之间也就有了统一的接口来交换以及同步数据,从而解决了上文提到的由于产品过多,民众的注意力被分散的问题。 更为重要的是,Open311 制定的 API 标准使得城市服务热线的数据得以真正开放。而此类数据对于城市规划等问题都是极为重要的。2010年,Wired就曾经从纽约的NYC 311服务那私下获取过近百万通311电话的数据,并就此制作了可视化图表进行数据分析。而现在有了 Open311 协议,通过开放的渠道来完整取得相关的数据就不再是问题。 Open311 作为一个美国土生土长的孩子,脱胎于美国城市服务热线 311,但它本身并不仅仅是一个美国的标准而是期望成为一个国际标准。目前除了美国的城市比如纽约、芝加哥之外,还有英国南安普敦、巴尼特,芬兰赫尔辛基等城市采用了 Open311 的 API 标准,那我们是不是也可以期待中国的 12345 有一日可以成为 Open12345 呢?

设计你的城市

localdata

LocalData 应用示意图,原图均取自 localdata 网站

城市的规划,听上去好像是一件离老百姓很远的事情。但如果政府采用开放模型来重新组织城市规划活动,那么普通民众也能参与其中,并且还能出其不意地帮助城市规划部门提升效率。拿城市规划的先期调研来说,规划机构往往需要耗费大量人力成本和时间成本来收集详细的城区地块数据。而这一过程,如果能够让熟悉这一地块的民众来协助,则会事半功倍。 2012年,美国 Code for America 的一批 Fellow 在和底特律市合作过程中,便意识到了这个城市规划中收集数据的难题,进而开发了一款新的应用 LocalData。LocalData 引入开放模型的理念,由规划部门来设定详细的问题,而民众则可以通过实地考察,然后在手机应用上录入数据回答问题。 这种众包的思路,在不同的美国城市都取得了极为难得的成绩。比如,印第安纳州的格雷市从上世纪60年代起就面临了人口衰减的问题,现如今,整座城市到处都是空宅无人居住,市政府有意将一些空宅拆除另做开发,但他们又缺乏翔实的数据来确定需要拆除的建筑范围,于是 LocalData 变成为了他们解决这一问题的关键。 通过市政府和芝加哥大学公共政策学院的合作与协调,当地67名志愿者调查了市内2000英亩地共计超过11651幢房屋。而调研的结果通过 LocalData 的可视化功能直观地展现给决策者让他们了解空房的密度,空间分布情况等,极大地方便了拆除计划的制定。

streetmix截图

普通民众的参与方式当然不仅仅局限于做这些数据的收集工作。Streetmix 是另一个由 Code for America 的 Fellow 们制作的应用,旨在释放人们对自己城市街道的想象力,用简单的网页应用,通过拖拽页面元素,设计出自己心目中的街道。而人们对某一街道的设计,又能通过该平台汇总产生统计数据,例如“70%的设计中包含了一条自行车道”,那么决策者便能更好地决定是否要在新街道规划中预留出一条自行车道以及具体如何设计它。这一应用一经推出,便受到了民众的广泛欢迎,而且因为它本身简单易用,很多人便把它作为了简易版的「模拟城市」游戏来尽情发挥想象力。比如,你有想过把整条街都占领当作自行车道吗?一位网民制作的 Streetmix 街道图就展现了这一「霸气」的设想。

原图来自 blog.streemix.net

写在最后

对于城市的建设,政府和城市规划专业工作人员不应当再是唯一的参与者和决策者,社会中每一份子都应当有机会去参与和贡献。这不仅仅需要更好的工具以及更多更丰富的开放数据来支撑,更重要的是,社会中的每一员,无论是政府公职人员,城市规划者,还是媒体,公益组织乃至普通市民,都应当先改变自己对城市规划和建设的看法,拨动那个小小的「开关」,改变自己的心态,拥抱开放模型,共建自己的家园。

从开放数据到开放发展(四) 城市 X 开放 X 数据

- January 8, 2014 in code for america, Featured, fixmystreet, open311, streetmix, 公民创新, 城市规划, 开放发展, 观点

把整个城市搬上 GitHub:开源芝加哥

GitHub 是一个代码托管网站,但与过往许许多多代码托管网站不同的地方在于其提供了充分「开放」的工作模式。它鼓励任何人对一个公开的代码库进行「复制」(fork) 从而对原有代码进行修改、扩展、改正,同时,它也充分鼓励任何人都参与进一个项目的讨论,你可以新开一个「工单」来提出问题,汇报 Bug,建议新增功能。正是这样「开放」的模式使其成为程序员届最重要的工具和社区。

而在2013年2月,芝加哥市政府决定将它们整个城市的数据上传至 GitHub,并鼓励所有人来「复制」它们的数据,帮助它们提升数据的质量或者利用这些数据作出创新的应用。这无疑是自2009年奥巴马政府宣布全国开展开放数据运动以来,开放数据领域内最大的壮举。你或许会问为什么这非常重要?这些数据不是或多或少已经开放在 data.gov 或者芝加哥市的开放数据门户上了吗?

事实上,如果说将数据放在开放门户提供大家下载是开放数据1.0,那么将数据放在 GitHub 这样一个鼓励开放协作的平台就是进入了开放数据 2.0。 开放协作使得数据能够像代码一样被「复制」并由社区来提升质量,而这就提供了一个「发布者-使用者」之间的双向通道来进一步帮助城市管理者将数据化为真正有用的资源,这是单单将数据开放下载所不能达到的效果。

开放的城市服务热线:从 FixMyStreet 到 Open311

FixMyStreet

FixMyStreet 截图

FixMyStreet 是英国民间非营利机构 MySociety 推出的第一款产品,也是首款在城市服务领域内引入开放模型的应用。往常,对于公共设施比如路面、街道路灯等的报修以及其他城市服务的投诉都只是单向的、单人的沟通,这也就造成了问题的重复投诉率高、处理进度不透明等问题。 而 FixMyStreet 首次引入了开放模型将单向、单人的沟通改造成双向、多人的沟通模式,允许多人集中地多一个问题进行投诉,并提供平台对有关部门的处理进度进行追踪。比如,上图中显示的就是英国南安普敦市市民向市政府投诉有路障倒地阻碍了人行道,地图上标记了准确的问题地点,次日早上市府便立刻回复说该问题已登记在案,并且在问题解决后,立刻再次回复让公众知情。

这样的开放模型在解决城市服务问题中有着众多的优点:首先,这样的开放模型更容易吸引人去参与进城市问题的投诉中。对于如今的手机党、微博党而言,可能简单的在地图上点点,写上两句话,要比起一本正经拨打热线电话来的更容易。其次,沟通成本会更低。传统的热线电话方式,使得单一问题的投诉重复率大大增加,而开放模式则使得单一问题能够由多人同时参与,这也就减轻了相关部门在接受问题投诉上所付出的时间和人力成本,避免资源浪费在同一问题上。最后,采用开放模型是政府树立良好形象的极佳途径。开放模型不仅仅是将工作流程开放,允许更多民众参与,更是对信息的透明化:政府何时受理该问题,是否持续跟进问题,是否已解决问题等等信息都通过一个透明化的渠道让公众知情,而这也将能更好的塑造一个透明、公开的政府形象。

FixMyStreet 的成功,顿时引爆了一场民间对城市服务热线改造的风潮。各种类型的类似产品在各个国家、城市相继推出,民众的参与热情一度高涨,但随之产生的问题也越来越多。首先,民间自行开发的类似产品虽然可以吸引到民众的参与,但是有时候却无法保证政府的参与。其次,由于产品过多,政府不可能在所有产品上同时跟进问题,这反而降低了政府效率。最后,因为每个人采用的产品很可能不同,因此投诉的重复率问题又回来了,因为民众的注意力被不同产品分散了。

wired_nyc_311

原图是Wired于2010年制作的关于纽约 311 热线电话数据的时序分析图

为了解决这些问题,Open311 诞生了。 Open311 其本身并不是一个新的App,而是一个供第三方应用与政府的城市服务热线进行数据交换的 API 标准。它所制定的标准确保了各个地方政府采用统一的接口来供第三方产品使用,这样就确保了所有第三方应用都能通过统一的渠道将数据反馈到政府机构。同时第三方应用之间也就有了统一的接口来交换以及同步数据,从而解决了上文提到的由于产品过多,民众的注意力被分散的问题。

更为重要的是,Open311 制定的 API 标准使得城市服务热线的数据得以真正开放。而此类数据对于城市规划等问题都是极为重要的。2010年,Wired就曾经从纽约的NYC 311服务那私下获取过近百万通311电话的数据,并就此制作了可视化图表进行数据分析。而现在有了 Open311 协议,通过开放的渠道来完整取得相关的数据就不再是问题。

Open311 作为一个美国土生土长的孩子,脱胎于美国城市服务热线 311,但它本身并不仅仅是一个美国的标准而是期望成为一个国际标准。目前除了美国的城市比如纽约、芝加哥之外,还有英国南安普敦、巴尼特,芬兰赫尔辛基等城市采用了 Open311 的 API 标准,那我们是不是也可以期待中国的 12345 有一日可以成为 Open12345 呢?

设计你的城市

localdata

LocalData 应用示意图,原图均取自 localdata 网站

城市的规划,听上去好像是一件离老百姓很远的事情。但如果政府采用开放模型来重新组织城市规划活动,那么普通民众也能参与其中,并且还能出其不意地帮助城市规划部门提升效率。拿城市规划的先期调研来说,规划机构往往需要耗费大量人力成本和时间成本来收集详细的城区地块数据。而这一过程,如果能够让熟悉这一地块的民众来协助,则会事半功倍。 2012年,美国 Code for America 的一批 Fellow 在和底特律市合作过程中,便意识到了这个城市规划中收集数据的难题,进而开发了一款新的应用 LocalData。LocalData 引入开放模型的理念,由规划部门来设定详细的问题,而民众则可以通过实地考察,然后在手机应用上录入数据回答问题。

这种众包的思路,在不同的美国城市都取得了极为难得的成绩。比如,印第安纳州的格雷市从上世纪60年代起就面临了人口衰减的问题,现如今,整座城市到处都是空宅无人居住,市政府有意将一些空宅拆除另做开发,但他们又缺乏翔实的数据来确定需要拆除的建筑范围,于是 LocalData 变成为了他们解决这一问题的关键。 通过市政府和芝加哥大学公共政策学院的合作与协调,当地67名志愿者调查了市内2000英亩地共计超过11651幢房屋。而调研的结果通过 LocalData 的可视化功能直观地展现给决策者让他们了解空房的密度,空间分布情况等,极大地方便了拆除计划的制定。

streetmix截图

普通民众的参与方式当然不仅仅局限于做这些数据的收集工作。Streetmix 是另一个由 Code for America 的 Fellow 们制作的应用,旨在释放人们对自己城市街道的想象力,用简单的网页应用,通过拖拽页面元素,设计出自己心目中的街道。而人们对某一街道的设计,又能通过该平台汇总产生统计数据,例如“70%的设计中包含了一条自行车道”,那么决策者便能更好地决定是否要在新街道规划中预留出一条自行车道以及具体如何设计它。这一应用一经推出,便受到了民众的广泛欢迎,而且因为它本身简单易用,很多人便把它作为了简易版的「模拟城市」游戏来尽情发挥想象力。比如,你有想过把整条街都占领当作自行车道吗?一位网民制作的 Streetmix 街道图就展现了这一「霸气」的设想。

原图来自 blog.streemix.net

写在最后

对于城市的建设,政府和城市规划专业工作人员不应当再是唯一的参与者和决策者,社会中每一份子都应当有机会去参与和贡献。这不仅仅需要更好的工具以及更多更丰富的开放数据来支撑,更重要的是,社会中的每一员,无论是政府公职人员,城市规划者,还是媒体,公益组织乃至普通市民,都应当先改变自己对城市规划和建设的看法,拨动那个小小的「开关」,改变自己的心态,拥抱开放模型,共建自己的家园。

Code for All – Open Knowledge Foundation Deutschland meets Code for America

- August 5, 2013 in Anwendungen, Apps, code for all, code for america, Deutschland, Featured, offene Daten, offenes Wissen, Open Knowledge Foundation, Programm, Stipendiat, Stipendien

Anfang Juli war ein Teil des OKF DE Teams zu Gast bei Code for America in San Francisco. Vor Ort hatten wir Gelegenheit uns intensiv mit dem Code for America Team auszutauschen und interessante Einblicke in das Programm zu bekommen. Diese Einblicke und den Grund unseres Treffens wollen wir euch natürlich nicht vorenthalten, es folgt ein kurzer Bericht.
Code for All Team

“Code for All” Teampic

Was ist Code for America? Code for America ist eine NGO die 2009 in San Francisco gegründet wurde. Die Idee hinter der Initiative ist es, die öffentliche Verwaltung enger mit technologischen Vordenkern zu vernetzen und so mehr externes Wissen in unterschiedliche Bereiche der Verwaltung einfließen zu lassen. Ziel ist es, das Innovationspotenzial junger technikaffiner Experten für die öffentliche Verwaltung nutzbar zu machen und so neue Lösungsansätze für alltägliche Herausforderungen in der Interaktion zwischen Bürgern und Verwaltung zu denken und Anwendungen für moderne öffentliche Dienstleistungen zu entwickeln. Durch neue innovative Services und veränderte Prozesse soll die Kommunikation zwischen Bürgern und Staat verbessert und die öffentlichen Verwaltung offener und effizienter werden. Herzstück von Code for America ist ein Stipendienprogramm, in dem Innovationsteams gemeinsam mit Städten an Herausforderungen und Problemen in Bereichen der öffentlichen Verwaltung arbeiten und nützliche Apps und Werkzeuge für BürgerInnen und die Verwaltung entwickeln. Unterstützt wird das Programm in den USA von einem hochkarätigen Vorstand aus der IT- und Technologie Szene. Der Grund unseres Besuchs Nach dem Erfolg unseres Inkubator-Programms Stadt Land Code haben wir Anfang des Jahres überlegt, wie man das Programm ausweiten und weiterentwickeln könnte. Dabei hat uns der Ansatz des Stipendienprogramms von Code for America sehr zugesagt. Insbesondere die enge Zusammenarbeit zwischen Entwicklern, Designern und Verwaltungsmitarbeitern stellte für uns eine spannende Weiterentwicklung des Inkubators dar. Denn durch die Kooperation werden nicht nur neue digitale Werkzeuge und Services entwickelt, sondern auch Prozesse verändert und ein Umdenken innerhalb des Verwaltungsapparats angestoßen. Aus dieser ersten Idee wurde eine Partnerschaft und die Open Knowledge Foundation Deutschland Teil der internationalen Ausweitung von Code for America: Code for All. Weitere Partner der internationalen Ausweitung sind Mexico City und die Karibik. Um den internationalen Teams die Möglichkeit zu geben, das Programm und die anderen Partner besser kennenzulernen, wurden alle “Code for All”-Partner zu einem mehrtägigen Workshop ins Code for America Büro nach San Francisco eingeladen. Tim O´Reilly Die Einblicke Während unseres Besuches hatten wir nicht nur Gelegenheit mit Tim O´Reilly über “Government as a Platform” zu sprechen und die unterschiedlichen Programme von Code for America kennenzulernen, sondern auch die Möglichkeit aus erster Hand von den Fellows zu erfahren, was sie antreibt, warum sie bei Code for America mitmachen und welche Problemstellungen sie gerade mit den Städten bearbeiten. Die Begeisterung mit der die Fellows und das gesamte Code for America-Team an dem Programm arbeiten, hat sich während der Zeit in San Francisco auf uns übertragen. Weshalb uns nach dem Workshop mehr denn je bewusst war, dass wir dieses tolle Programm auch nach Deutschland bringen müssen. Wie in den USA sollen auch in Deutschland in Zukunft neue Ideen und Ansätze Einzug in die öffentliche Verwaltung halten und die Vordenker in den Behörden von externen Entwicklern und Designern unterstützt werden. Offene Daten sollen nicht in Datenkatalogen verwaisen, sondern von so vielen Menschen wie möglich genutzt und aufbereitet werden. In den Städten sollen Communities entstehen, die eng mit der Verwaltung zusammenarbeiten und Vehörden fortlaufend dabei unterstützen neue innovative Services und Anwendungen für Bürger zu entwickeln. Viele Stipendiaten treibt vor allem die Möglichkeit an, ihre Fähigkeiten und ihr Know-how gewinnbringend für die Gesellschaft einzusetzen. Ein Großteil der Fellows hat vor Code for America in IT-Unternehmen gearbeitet und Erfahrungen in der Umsetzung von Projekten gesammelt, das sie nun in der Zusammenarbeit mit den Partnerstädten einsetzen können. Die Zusammensetzung der Teams ist interdisziplinär, neben Softwareentwicklern, bestehen die Teams aus Designern und Profis aus dem Bereich Projektmanagement und Kommunikation.
office

Code for America Office, San Francisco

Die Ergebnisse In den USA bewerben sich jedes Jahr über 600 Stipendiaten und 60 Städte um eine Teilnahme an dem Programm. 2013 ging das Programm mit 10 Städten und 90 Stipendiaten an den Start. In enger Zusammenarbeit zwischen Stipendiaten und den teilnehmenden Städten enstehen über das Jahr Anwendungen wie Honolulu Answers, Textizen oder Procure.io. Eine Zusammenfassung der Ergebnisse und beteiligten Städte der letzten drei Jahre findet sich in dem Jahresbericht von Code for America. Neben dem Stipendienprogramm hat Code for America zwei weitere Programme initiiert, die zu einem nachhaltigen Civic-App Ökosystem beitragen. The Brigade – Um die angestoßenen Entwicklungen im Bereich Civic Apps und Open Data weiter voranzutreiben ist es wichtig eine lokale Community aus Entwicklern aufzubauen und sie mit Mitarbeitern der Stadt zu vernetzen. Diesen Communityaufbau zu befördern, zu unterstützen und für Austausch unter den Communities zu sorgen ist Ziel des Brigade-Programms. The Accelerator – fördert Teams die auf Basis der entwickelten Apps und Werkzeuge StartUps gründen wollen. Code for All | Deutschland In Deutschland liegt der Fokus des ersten Programmjahres auf dem Stipendienprogramm und dem Aufbau von lokalen Communities. Mit drei Städten und neun Stipendiaten wollen wir im ersten Jahr ein spannendes Programm mit vielen Workshops, lokalen Events und starken Partnern auf die Beine stellen. Momentan sind wir in Gesprächen mit potenziellen Städtepartnern und Sponsoren für das Programm. Mehr Infos zu Code for All | Deutschland findet man auf unserer PreLaunch-Page: www.codeforall.de Stay tuned & get in touch!