You are browsing the archive for colonialism.

W. B. O’Shaughnessy and the Introduction of Cannabis to Modern Western Medicine

Adam Green - April 19, 2017 in calcutta, cannabis, colonial science, colonialism, first trials medical marijuana, india, marijuana, medical cannabis, medical marijuana, Science & Medicine, weed

Cataleptic trances, enormous appetites, and giggling fits aside, W. B. O'Shaughnessy's investigations at a Calcutta hospital into the potential of medical marijuana — the first such trials in modern medicine — were largely positive. Sujaan Mukherjee explores the intricacies of this pioneering research and what it can tell us more generally about the production of knowledge in colonial science.

Richard Hakluyt and Early English Travel

Adam Green - October 26, 2016 in Assan Aga, Books, colonialism, Culture & History, exploration, Richard Hakluyt, Samson Rowlie, travel

The Principles of Navigation, Richard Hakluyt's great championing of Elizabethan colonial exploration, remains one of the most important collections of English travel writing ever published. As well as the escapades of famed names such as Francis Drake and Walter Raleigh, Nandini Das looks at how the book preserves many stories of lesser known figures that surely would have been otherwise lost.

The Calcutta Pococurante Society: Public and Private in India’s Age of Reform

Adam Green - August 17, 2016 in Bengal, British Empire, British Raj, calcutta, Calcutta Pococurante Society, colonialism, Culture & History, india, kol, Kolkata, private, public, societies, supplement

Joshua Ehrlich on an obscure text found on the shelves of a Bengali library and the light it sheds on the idea of the public in 19th-century Calcutta.

The Map That Changed the Middle East (1916)

Adam Green - May 16, 2016 in colonialism, egypt, first world war, how middle east was carved up, iran, iraq, israel, Middle East, ottoman empire, palestine, Sykes Picot Agreement Map, syria, war, world war one, ww1

The map that changed the Middle East, outlining a secret agreement between the the UK and France on how they would carve up the Middle East should the Ottoman Empire be defeated in the First World War.

The Map That Changed the Middle East (1916)

Adam Green - May 16, 2016 in colonialism, egypt, first world war, how middle east was carved up, iran, iraq, israel, Middle East, ottoman empire, palestine, Sykes Picot Agreement Map, syria, war, world war one, ww1

The map that changed the Middle East, outlining a secret agreement between the the UK and France on how they would carve up the Middle East should the Ottoman Empire be defeated in the First World War.

The Map That Changed the Middle East (1916)

Adam Green - May 16, 2016 in colonialism, egypt, first world war, how middle east was carved up, iran, iraq, israel, Middle East, ottoman empire, palestine, Sykes Picot Agreement Map, syria, war, world war one, ww1

The map that changed the Middle East, outlining a secret agreement between the the UK and France on how they would carve up the Middle East should the Ottoman Empire be defeated in the First World War.

Forgotten Failures of African Exploration

Adam Green - April 22, 2015 in africa, colonialism, congo river, Culture & History, expedition, exploration, John H. Tuckey, Major William Gray

Dane Kennedy reflects on two disastrous expeditions into Africa organised by the British in the early-19th century, and how their lofty ambitions crumbled before the implacable realities of the continent.

When Chocolate was Medicine: Colmenero, Wadsworth and Dufour

Adam Green - January 28, 2015 in cacao, chocolate, cocoa, colmenero, colonialism, Culture & History, dufour, history of chocolate, mesoamerica, mexico, Science & Medicine, wadsworth

Chocolate has not always been the common confectionary we experience today. When it arrived from the Americas into Europe in the 17th century it was a rare and mysterious substance, thought more of as a drug than as a food. Christine Jones traces the history and literature of its reception.

1592: Coining Columbus

Adam Green - April 16, 2014 in america, Art & Illustrations, Books, Christopher columbus, colonialism, Culture & History, exploration

For many the arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Americas is inextricably linked to a particular image: a small group of confident men on a tropical beach formally announcing their presence to the dumbfounded Amerindians. Michiel van Groesen explores the origins of this eurocentric iconography and ascribes it's persistence to the editorial strategy of the publisher who invented the initial design a full century after Columbus' encounter took place.

Canada Through a Lens: the British Library Colonial Copyright Collection

Adam Green - July 2, 2013 in British Library, Canada, CC, collections, colonialism, copyright, Curator's Choice, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Europeana, Images, Images-19th, Images-20th, Images-Animals, Images-People, Images-Photography, Photography, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide, Wikimedia Commons

CURATOR’S CHOICE #1: PHIL HATFIELD AND ANDREW GRAY FROM THE BRITISH LIBRARY Phil Hatfield, British Library Curator in Canadian and Caribbean Studies, and Andrew Gray, British Library Wikipedian in Residence, kick off our brand new Curator’s Choice series by taking a look at the fascinating array of photographs in the British Library’s Canadian Colonial Copyright Collection. Copyright collections – those aggregations of published material accumulated by libraries as a result of copyright deposit laws – can provide a unique view of the world; especially when they have the opportunity to add photographs to their holdings. With minimal curatorial involvement in their selection and collection, as well as few gate keepers beyond the administration fee required to register copyright, you could say that such caches of material are a rare thing – a photographic world selected by myriad photographers themselves. This is the format of the British Library’s Colonial Copyright Collection of Canadian photographs, over 4,000 images registered for deposit and collected by the Library between 1895 and 1924. By and large the contents of the collection have been copyrighted as a result of the quality of the shot, the potential to make money from the photograph or, most likely, a […]