You are browsing the archive for Data Journalism.

Data is a Team Sport: Data-Driven Journalism

Dirk Slater - June 20, 2017 in Anti-corruption, community, Data Blog, data driven journalism, Data Journalism, data literacy, Event report, Fabriders, Gender Data, research, Rights

Our podcast series that explores the ever evolving data literacy eco-system. Cut and paste this link into your podcast app to subscribe: http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:311573348/sounds.rss or find us in the iTunes Store and Stitcher. In this episode we speak with two veteran data literacy practitioners who have been involved with developing data-driven journalism teams. Our guests:
  • Eva Constantaras is a data journalist specialized in building data journalism teams in developing countries. These teams that have reported from across Latin America, Asia and East Africa on topics ranging from displacement and kidnapping by organized crime networks to extractive industries and public health. As a Google Data Journalism Scholar and a Fulbright Fellow, she developed a course for investigative and data journalism in high-risk environments.
  • Natalia Mazotte is Program Manager of School of Data in Brazil and founder and co-director of the digital magazine Gender and Number. She has a Master Degree in Communications and Culture from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and a specialization in Digital Strategy from Pompeu Fabra University (Barcelona/Spain). Natalia has been teaching data skills in different universities and newsrooms around Brazil. She also works as instructor in online courses in the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas, a project from Texas University, and writes for international publications such as SGI News, Bertelsmann-Stiftung, Euroactiv and Nieman Lab.

Notes from this episode

They both describe the lessons learned in getting journalists to use data that can drive social change. For Eva, getting journalists to work harder and just reporting that corruption exists is not enough, while Natalia, talks about how they use data on gender to drive debate and discussion around equality. What is critical for democracy is the existence of good journalism and this includes data-driven journalism that uncovers facts and gets at the root causes.

Gaps in the Data Literacy EcoSystem:

Natalia points out that corporations and government has the power because they are data-literate and can use it effectively, while people in low-income communities, such as favela’s really suffer because they are at the mercy of what story gets told by looking at the ‘official’ data. Eva feels that there has been too much emphasis on short-term and quick solutions from individuals who have put a lot of money in making sure that data is ready and accessible.  Donors need to support more long-term efforts and engagement around data-literacy.

Adjusting to a ‘post-fact’ world means:

Western journalists have spent too much time focusing on reporting on polling data rather than reporting on policies and it’s important for newer journalists to understand why that was problematic. In Brazil, the main stream media is focusing on ‘what’s happened’ while independent media is focusing on ‘why it’s happened’ and this means the media landscape is changing.

They also talked about:

  • Ethics and the responsibility inherent in gathering and storing data, along with the grey areas around privacy.
  • How to get media outlets to value data-driven journalism by getting them to understand that people are increasingly getting their ‘breaking news’ from social media, so they need to look at providing more in-depth stories.

They wanted to plug:

Readings/Resources they find inspiring for their work.

Resources contributed from the participants:

View the online conversation in full:

Flattr this!

Data is a Team Sport: Data-Driven Journalism

Dirk Slater - June 20, 2017 in Anti-corruption, community, Data Blog, data driven journalism, Data Journalism, data literacy, Event report, Fabriders, Gender Data, research, Rights

Our podcast series that explores the ever evolving data literacy eco-system. Cut and paste this link into your podcast app to subscribe: http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:311573348/sounds.rss or find us in the iTunes Store and Stitcher. In this episode we speak with two veteran data literacy practitioners who have been involved with developing data-driven journalism teams. Our guests:
  • Eva Constantaras is a data journalist specialized in building data journalism teams in developing countries. These teams that have reported from across Latin America, Asia and East Africa on topics ranging from displacement and kidnapping by organized crime networks to extractive industries and public health. As a Google Data Journalism Scholar and a Fulbright Fellow, she developed a course for investigative and data journalism in high-risk environments.
  • Natalia Mazotte is Program Manager of School of Data in Brazil and founder and co-director of the digital magazine Gender and Number. She has a Master Degree in Communications and Culture from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and a specialization in Digital Strategy from Pompeu Fabra University (Barcelona/Spain). Natalia has been teaching data skills in different universities and newsrooms around Brazil. She also works as instructor in online courses in the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas, a project from Texas University, and writes for international publications such as SGI News, Bertelsmann-Stiftung, Euroactiv and Nieman Lab.

Notes from this episode

They both describe the lessons learned in getting journalists to use data that can drive social change. For Eva, getting journalists to work harder and just reporting that corruption exists is not enough, while Natalia, talks about how they use data on gender to drive debate and discussion around equality. What is critical for democracy is the existence of good journalism and this includes data-driven journalism that uncovers facts and gets at the root causes.

Gaps in the Data Literacy EcoSystem:

Natalia points out that corporations and government has the power because they are data-literate and can use it effectively, while people in low-income communities, such as favela’s really suffer because they are at the mercy of what story gets told by looking at the ‘official’ data. Eva feels that there has been too much emphasis on short-term and quick solutions from individuals who have put a lot of money in making sure that data is ready and accessible.  Donors need to support more long-term efforts and engagement around data-literacy.

Adjusting to a ‘post-fact’ world means:

Western journalists have spent too much time focusing on reporting on polling data rather than reporting on policies and it’s important for newer journalists to understand why that was problematic. In Brazil, the main stream media is focusing on ‘what’s happened’ while independent media is focusing on ‘why it’s happened’ and this means the media landscape is changing.

They also talked about:

  • Ethics and the responsibility inherent in gathering and storing data, along with the grey areas around privacy.
  • How to get media outlets to value data-driven journalism by getting them to understand that people are increasingly getting their ‘breaking news’ from social media, so they need to look at providing more in-depth stories.

They wanted to plug:

Readings/Resources they find inspiring for their work.

Resources contributed from the participants:

View the online conversation in full:

Flattr this!

Δημόσιοι φορείς και ανοικτά δεδομένα στην Ελλάδα

Spyridoula Markou - June 18, 2017 in Data Journalism, Featured, Featured @en, News, Uncategorized @en, Νέα

Τα ανοικτά δεδομένα μονοπωλούν τα τελευταία χρόνια τις συζητήσεις που αφορούν τη διαφάνεια και τη διάχυση των πληροφοριών μεταξύ των οργανισμών (δημοσίων και μη) και των πολιτών. Η Ελλάδα σε συμμόρφωση προς τις κοινοτικές οδηγίες της ΕΕ (2013/37/ΕΕ) και τη διεθνή πρακτική που ακολουθείται για τα ανοικτά δεδομένα, έχει θεσπίσει νομοθετικό πλαίσιο από το 2006 […]

#DataJournalismDisclosure: Μυστικές παρακολουθήσεις …από αέρος

Despoina Mantziari - May 28, 2017 in Data Journalism, Featured, Featured @en

Των Δέσποινα Μάντζιαρη, Κατερίνα Μπακιρτζή Τον Απρίλιο του 2016, οι δημοσιογράφοι Peter Aldhous και Charles Seife “ταρακούνησαν” την Αμερική με τις αποκαλύψεις τους για συστηματικές παρακολουθήσεις των μυστικών υπηρεσιών ασφαλείας (FBI και DHS) των ΗΠΑ από αέρος στο εσωτερικό της χώρας και ιδιαίτερα σε μεγάλες πόλεις . Τα αεροπλάνα των μυστικών κρατικών υπηρεσιών πετούσαν μόλις ένα […]

Πώς οι δημοσιογράφοι μπορούν να χειριστούν καλύτερα τα δημόσια οικονομικά δεδομένα και να παράγουν ιστορίες βασισμένες σ’ αυτά; Συνέντευξη με τον Nicolas Kayser-Bril

Despoina Mantziari - May 22, 2017 in Data Journalism, Featured, Featured @en

Της Diana Krebs Ο Nicolas Kayser-Bril είναι ο πρώην CEO και συνιδρυτής του Journalism++ (J++), μιας ομάδας ερευνητών δημοσιογράφων, η οποία εξειδικεύεται στην δημοσιογραφία δεδομένων. Στο πλαίσιο της συμμετοχής του στο Openbudgets.eu του OKI, είχαμε την τύχη να δουλέψουμε με το J++ πάνω στο ζήτημα του πώς οι δημόσιοι προϋπολογισμοί και τα δεδομένα δαπανών μπορούν να […]

How can journalists best handle public fiscal data to produce data-driven stories? An interview with Nicolas Kayser-Bril

Diana Krebs - May 16, 2017 in Data Journalism

Nicolas Kayser-Bril is the former CEO and co-founder of Journalism++ (J++), a group of investigative journalists that specialises in data-driven reporting. As part of OKI’s own involvement in Openbudgets.eu, we had the good fortune of working with  J++ on the question how public budget and spending data can be used to tackle corruption. In this short interview, Diana Krebs (Project Manager for Fiscal Projects at OKI) asked Nicolas about his experience on how journalists today can best handle public fiscal data to produce data-driven stories.   Are journalists today equipped to work with fiscal data such as budget and spending data? Different sorts of journalists use budget and spending data in different ways. Investigative outlets such as the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (of Panama-Papers fame) or investigative lone wolves such as Dirk Laabs (who investigated privatizations in East Germany) are very much able to seek and use such data. Most other types of journalists are not able to do so.   Where do you see the gaps? What kind of skill sets, technical and non-technical, do journalists need to have to write data-driven stories that stick and are water-proof? The largest gap is the lack of incentive. Very few journalists are tasked with investigating government spending and budgets. The ones who do, either because they are interested in the topic or because they are paid investigative journalists, sometimes lack the field-specific expertise that allows for quick judgments. One can only know what’s abnormal (and therefore newsworthy) if one knows what the normal state of things is. In public budgets, few journalists know what is normal and what’s not.   Do you think it’s helpful for journalists to, when in doubt, work closely with experts from the public administration to enhance their fiscal data knowledge? Journalists are trained to find experts to illustrate their articles or to provide information. It would help to have easy-to-reach experts on public funding that journalists could contact.   What are the ingredients for a sustainable increase of fiscal data knowledge among journalists, so that the public can be informed in a credible and informative way? These are two different issues; it would be a mistake to believe that the information the public receives is in any way linked to the work of journalists. This was true in the last century, when journalists were de facto intermediaries between what happened and reports of what had happened. (They were de facto intermediaries because all means of communication involved a need to package information for film, radio, TV or newspapers). For journalists to produce more content on budget and spending issues, they must be incentivised to do so by their organizations. This could mean for news organizations to shift their focus towards public accountability. Organizations that have, such as ProPublica in the USA and Correctiv in Germany, happen to employ journalists who know how to decipher budget data. For the public to be informed about public budget and spending, the availability of interesting and entertaining content on the issue would help. However, demand for such content could also be boosted by the administration, who could celebrate citizens who ask questions on public budgets, which is currently not the case. They could also teach the basics of how government – and government finance – works at school, which is barely done, when at all.   J++ has developed several projects around unlocking fiscal data such as Cookingbudgets.com, a quite serious satire tutorial webpage for journalists and civil society activists to look for budget stories in the public administration. Their latest coup is “The Good, the Bad and the Accountant”, an interactive online application that puts users in the shoes of a manager of a big cities to learn about and recognize patterns of corruption within the public administration.

Ολοκληρώθηκε η πρώτη μέρα του εργαστηρίου δημοσιογραφίας δεδομένων- Red Flags σε ΕΣΠΑ

Spyridoula Markou - April 2, 2017 in Data Journalism, Featured, Featured @en, Εκδηλώσεις, Εφαρμογές

Με επιτυχία ολοκληρώθηκε η πρώτη μέρα του εργαστήριου “Data Journalism Hackathon: Κόκκινες Σημαίες στα προγράμματα ΕΣΠΑ” που πραγματοποιήθηκε στις 31 Μαρτίου από το το Ίδρυμα Ανοικτής Γνώσης Ελλάδας, το Εργαστήριο Εφαρμογών Πληροφορικής στα ΜΜΕ (Τμήμα Δημοσιογραφίας και ΜΜΕ του ΑΠΘ) και την Ένωση Συντακτών Ημερήσιων Εφημερίδων Μακεδονίας Θράκης. Στο πρώτο μέρος του εργαστηρίου ο κ. […]

Το Open Knowlege Greece στην ημερίδα του Ευρωκοινοβουλίου για τις ψευδείς ειδήσεις

Spyridoula Markou - March 3, 2017 in Data Journalism, Featured, Featured @en, Εκδηλώσεις

Ομιλητής στην ημερίδα με θέμα «“Fake News” in Social Media as Reality Shapers: Unfounded information and legitimacy crisis at the new media period» θα είναι ο συντονιστής του School of Data του Ιδρύματος Ανοικτής Γνώσης Ελλάδας κ. Ανδρέας Βέγλης, Καθηγητής Δημοσιογραφίας και ΜΜΕ στο ΑΠΘ. Η εκδήλωση, που θα πραγματοποιηθεί στις 8 Μαρτίου 2017 στο […]

Workshop Δημοσιογραφίας Δεδομένων

Despoina Mantziari - December 5, 2016 in Data Journalism, Featured, Featured @en, ανοικτά δεδομένα, Δημοσιογραφία Δεδομένων, Εκδηλώσεις

Δημοσιογράφοι και φοιτητές παρακολούθησαν Workshop για τη Δημοσιογραφία Δεδομένων, με τη συμμετοχή εισηγητών του School of Data Στο πλαίσιο του OKI Summit, το οποίο πραγματοποιήθηκε στα τέλη Νοεμβρίου στη Θεσσαλονίκη, το Ελληνικό Παράρτημα του Open Knowledge Foundation και το  Εργαστήριο Εφαρμογών Πληροφορικής στα ΜΜΕ του Τμήματος Δημοσιογραφίας & ΜΜΕ-ΑΠΘ, σε συνεργασία με την Ένωση Συντακτών […]

Workshop Δημοσιογραφίας Δεδομένων

Despoina Mantziari - December 5, 2016 in Data Journalism, Featured, Featured @en, ανοικτά δεδομένα, Δημοσιογραφία Δεδομένων, Εκδηλώσεις

Δημοσιογράφοι και φοιτητές παρακολούθησαν Workshop για τη Δημοσιογραφία Δεδομένων, με τη συμμετοχή εισηγητών του School of Data Στο πλαίσιο του OKI Summit, το οποίο πραγματοποιήθηκε στα τέλη Νοεμβρίου στη Θεσσαλονίκη, το Ελληνικό Παράρτημα του Open Knowledge Foundation και το  Εργαστήριο Εφαρμογών Πληροφορικής στα ΜΜΕ του Τμήματος Δημοσιογραφίας & ΜΜΕ-ΑΠΘ, σε συνεργασία με την Ένωση Συντακτών […]