You are browsing the archive for Daten.

Get ready for the Open Tourism Data Hackday

Oleg - September 14, 2017 in Allgemein, Apps, Daten, event, Tourism

On the 27. – 28. October 2017 we are hosting a hackathon in Arosa on the topic of innovation in and the future of tourism. Please visit http://tourism.opendata.ch for more info. To get prepared, take a look through presentations from the last Opendata.ch conference, where the event was announced, notably the keynote by Pascal Jenny (@TDkonge) – Wie der Schweizer Bergtourismus von Open Data profitieren kann (PDF), and the Open Tourism & Transport Datatrack: – Christian Trachsel: Herausforderungen, Ziele & Zukunft mit Open Data bei SBB
– Christian Helbling: Transport API
– Stefan Keller: Nutzung von OpenStreetMap für Tourismus und Transport1
– Andreas Liebrich: OpenData im Tourismus: (Un-)genutztes Potenzial bis à go go? A couple of projects can already be found on the old make.opendata.ch wiki, and there is at least one interesting initiative to check out in the Open Knowledge and School of Data network: the Belgian Open Tourism working group. We are working on preparing platforms and resources, and a workshop along the lines of what we did in January has been suggested. Please give me a shout if you’re interested in supporting or participating.

Condatos 2017 and Abrelatam: Latin American Open Data Conference

florianwieser - September 8, 2017 in Allgemein, Daten, event, International

Until one month ago, I had the pleasure to work as a community manager for Opendata.ch, co-coordinating the “Business Innovation food.opendata” and supporting different food-related open data projects that came out of the Open Food Hackdays in February 2017. In the beginning of August, I changed the scenery. For the coming year, I’m going to be studying in Costa Rica in Central America, finishing my Master’s degree in Strategy and International Management. Living in this new context and in a new culture, I was very curious how the open data world would look like in this part of the world. Two weeks ago, from August 23 to 25, 2017, I now had the chance to take part in the regional open data conference of Latin America, taking place in San José, Costa Rica. With this blog post, I would like to share with you the impressions I had and what the open data movement in Latin America is all about. In the following lines I will describe the various conversations with people from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, and all the way down until Argentina.

Open Data in Latin America – A civil society movement

Latin America is a region that faces a lot of issues – ranging from corrupt governments to lack in infrastructure and services to large inequalities in income and wealth. In times of digitalization, these inequalities become even bigger as the lack in infrastructure and resources leads to an inaccessibility to new technologies and education for many people in the region – widening ever more the gap between the more privileged and the poor. In order to close this gap, various civil society organizations started to collect their own data with the help of citizens in order to visualize and get information about the problems existing in the different countries. Further, many journalists are switching to data journalism in order to discover irregularities within the processes of sometimes corrupt governments. Open Data also helps governments themselves to keep transparency and figure – avoiding the huge economic costs that corruption entails. The Abrelatam and Condatos 2017 conferences were a gathering of around 300 civil society and data journalism practitioners from all over Latin America – including countries like Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina – together forming a community to jointly address these issues.

Creativity is key

It was very impressive to see, with what professionality and creativity this conference was presented. The open data community in Latin America did a very good job in However, not only the visual design of the conference was very appealing. The conference itself consisted of a very interesting mix between collaborative brainstorming in form of an unconference – Abrelatam – the day before the actual two days of conference, where participants could share their thoughts and concerns. The following days were between talks and interactive workshops, allowing people to simultaneously gain more knowledge and apply this directly in practice. The issues talked about, the professional and creative presentation – especially in comparison to other events in Latin America – and a very motivated and inspired crowd made this gathering a very progressive and creative space where innovation actually could happen.

Open Data is a government priority

Who thinks that open data in Latin America is a minor movement that takes place at the periphery of society by a few geeks is very wrong. Facing a lot of challenges innovative governments in Latin America have recognized that in order to solve the social issues they need the help of the civil society and it’s citizens. That governments have recognized the potential that lies in open data is maybe best materialized in the presence of the President of the Republic Costa Rica who was present in the closing ceremony of the conference where he hold a keynote speech. In his words, there is a strong necessity for institutions to change and this can only take place in an interplay between governments, civil society and academia. Costa Rica actually started an initiative called “Gobierno Abierto” (Engl.: “Open Government”). Also in the panel about fighting corruption with open data it become clear that many of the Latin American governments are honestly attempting to make administration processes more efficient and transparent through open data. The way to go however still remains very large.

Where is Open Data in Latin America going?

Finally, it is to say that open data is in a very interesting stage in Latin America. This in the sense that the collection and publication of data through citizens actually can contribute to detect and visualize and create new solutions for problems that exist through a lack of governmental and institutional voids. Unfortunately, the role of businesses in this process hasn’t been discussed at large during this conference. Even though there were sessions on how to scale impact of open data initiatives and how to create business models, these were not merely targeted towards big corporations in the region. However, there seems to be a big potential for businesses especially in countries where there often exist a lack of basic government services. Finally, it became very clear among all the participants that there is a need for a change in mindset within Latin America’s society in order to push the agenda of the open data movement further. The fact that governments are starting to take on the efforts of the open data movement seems promising, but it also becomes clear that the members of the conference are far from being a representative sample of the Latin American society. In this sense, open data has to be pushed even further and be made more inclusive for the region’s citizens. All in all, I spent some very interesting days in San José where I met many very engaged and highly talented people pushing the open data agenda for Latin America further. As described, I personally think that this community consists over some very valuable skills in this region of the world to have a big influence and become a force for positive change – I will be very glad to follow this further. By Florian Wieser, September 5, 2017, from San José, Costa Rica.

Condatos 2017 and Abrelatam: Latin American Open Data Conference

florianwieser - September 8, 2017 in Allgemein, Daten, event, International

Until one month ago, I had the pleasure to work as a community manager for Opendata.ch, co-coordinating the “Business Innovation food.opendata” and supporting different food-related open data projects that came out of the Open Food Hackdays in February 2017. In the beginning of August, I changed the scenery. For the coming year, I’m going to be studying in Costa Rica in Central America, finishing my Master’s degree in Strategy and International Management. Living in this new context and in a new culture, I was very curious how the open data world would look like in this part of the world. Two weeks ago, from August 23 to 25, 2017, I now had the chance to take part in the regional open data conference of Latin America, taking place in San José, Costa Rica. With this blog post, I would like to share with you the impressions I had and what the open data movement in Latin America is all about. In the following lines I will describe the various conversations with people from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, and all the way down until Argentina.

Open Data in Latin America – A civil society movement

Latin America is a region that faces a lot of issues – ranging from corrupt governments to lack in infrastructure and services to large inequalities in income and wealth. In times of digitalization, these inequalities become even bigger as the lack in infrastructure and resources leads to an inaccessibility to new technologies and education for many people in the region – widening ever more the gap between the more privileged and the poor. In order to close this gap, various civil society organizations started to collect their own data with the help of citizens in order to visualize and get information about the problems existing in the different countries. Further, many journalists are switching to data journalism in order to discover irregularities within the processes of sometimes corrupt governments. Open Data also helps governments themselves to keep transparency and figure – avoiding the huge economic costs that corruption entails. The Abrelatam and Condatos 2017 conferences were a gathering of around 300 civil society and data journalism practitioners from all over Latin America – including countries like Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina – together forming a community to jointly address these issues.

Creativity is key

It was very impressive to see, with what professionality and creativity this conference was presented. The open data community in Latin America did a very good job in However, not only the visual design of the conference was very appealing. The conference itself consisted of a very interesting mix between collaborative brainstorming in form of an unconference – Abrelatam – the day before the actual two days of conference, where participants could share their thoughts and concerns. The following days were between talks and interactive workshops, allowing people to simultaneously gain more knowledge and apply this directly in practice. The issues talked about, the professional and creative presentation – especially in comparison to other events in Latin America – and a very motivated and inspired crowd made this gathering a very progressive and creative space where innovation actually could happen.

Open Data is a government priority

Who thinks that open data in Latin America is a minor movement that takes place at the periphery of society by a few geeks is very wrong. Facing a lot of challenges innovative governments in Latin America have recognized that in order to solve the social issues they need the help of the civil society and it’s citizens. That governments have recognized the potential that lies in open data is maybe best materialized in the presence of the President of the Republic Costa Rica who was present in the closing ceremony of the conference where he hold a keynote speech. In his words, there is a strong necessity for institutions to change and this can only take place in an interplay between governments, civil society and academia. Costa Rica actually started an initiative called “Gobierno Abierto” (Engl.: “Open Government”). Also in the panel about fighting corruption with open data it become clear that many of the Latin American governments are honestly attempting to make administration processes more efficient and transparent through open data. The way to go however still remains very large.

Where is Open Data in Latin America going?

Finally, it is to say that open data is in a very interesting stage in Latin America. This in the sense that the collection and publication of data through citizens actually can contribute to detect and visualize and create new solutions for problems that exist through a lack of governmental and institutional voids. Unfortunately, the role of businesses in this process hasn’t been discussed at large during this conference. Even though there were sessions on how to scale impact of open data initiatives and how to create business models, these were not merely targeted towards big corporations in the region. However, there seems to be a big potential for businesses especially in countries where there often exist a lack of basic government services. Finally, it became very clear among all the participants that there is a need for a change in mindset within Latin America’s society in order to push the agenda of the open data movement further. The fact that governments are starting to take on the efforts of the open data movement seems promising, but it also becomes clear that the members of the conference are far from being a representative sample of the Latin American society. In this sense, open data has to be pushed even further and be made more inclusive for the region’s citizens. All in all, I spent some very interesting days in San José where I met many very engaged and highly talented people pushing the open data agenda for Latin America further. As described, I personally think that this community consists over some very valuable skills in this region of the world to have a big influence and become a force for positive change – I will be very glad to follow this further. By Florian Wieser, September 5, 2017, from San José, Costa Rica.

Jetzt anmelden: Open Tourism Data Hackdays

murielstaub - August 18, 2017 in Allgemein, Daten, event, National

Abenteuer, Reisen, Ferien, Urlaub – Wörter, die unsere Herzen höher schlagen lassen. Aus diesem Grund freuen wir uns besonders, vom 27. – 28. Oktober 2017 in Arosa die MAKE Open Tourism Data Hackdays 2017 durchführen zu können. Bekanntlich verfolgt unser Verein 3 übergeordnete Ziele: Transparenz, Innovation und Effizienz. Während wir uns mit den Election Hackdays im 2015 der Transparenz und mit den Energy Hackdays im 2016 der Effizienz gewidmet haben, dreht sich in diesem Herbst alles um Innovation – genauer gesagt um Innovation im Bereich Tourismus. Am 27. und 28. Oktober 2017 erwarten wir euch – Entwickler/innen, Designer/innen, Tourismusbegeisterte und Interessierte – im Sport- und Kongresszentrum in Arosa und entwickeln alle gemeinsam innovative Ideen für das Tourismusbüro und die Tourismusdestination der Zukunft. Anmelden könnt ihr euch auf Eventbrite: opentourismdata.eventbrite.ch
Und weitere Infos zur Veranstaltung findet ihr auf tourism.opendata.ch

Wikidata Workshop on September 14 in Zurich!

murielstaub - July 28, 2017 in Allgemein, Daten, event, Zürich

  Are you interested in Wikidata? On September 14, Lea Lacroix, Cristina Sarasua and Rama will run a Wikidata workshop the day before HackZurich starts, at the University of Zurich. They’re going to explain what Wikidata is, and have hands-on sessions to learn how to code for and with Wikidata. Register now or get more information about the event.

Opendata.ch/2017: Videos sind online!

murielstaub - July 27, 2017 in Allgemein, Daten, event, Luzern, National

 
 

Über 20 Speaker, über 200 Teilnehmende und jede Menge spannende Gespräche – das war die Opendata.ch/2017! Für all diejenigen, die nochmals in die Inhalte eintauchen möchten oder die Konferenz verpasst haben, stehen nun die Video-Aufnahmen zur Verfügung. Hier geht’s zur Playlist.

Beliebtes Vornamen-Tool des Bundes jetzt auf vornamen.opendata.ch

murielstaub - July 13, 2017 in Allgemein, Daten, National

Auf Initiative der Privatwirtschaft wurde das beliebteste Web-Tool des Bundesamts für Statistik neu programmiert und kann seit heute unter der Adresse https://vornamen.opendata.ch wieder genutzt werden. Die interaktive Datenbank ermöglicht Abfragen zur Häufigkeit von Vornamen in der Wohnbevölkerung der Schweiz. Das Bundesamt für Statistik (BFS) hat die Vornamen seit 1902 nicht nur gesammelt, sondern auch in einem interaktiven Tool der Bevölkerung zur Verfügung gestellt. Die beliebte Vornamen-Suche ist aber aus Spargründen und wegen eines neuen Webauftritts des BFS nicht mehr verfügbar. Auf der Website des BFS heisst es seither: “Das BFS hat seinen Webauftritt modernisiert. In der neuen technischen Umgebung steht das Vornamen-Tool nicht mehr zur Verfügung.” Interessierte können die Rohdaten nach wie vor in Tabellenform herunterladen und einsehen. Die Daten sind aber so nicht für jedermann einfach zugänglich und einsehbar. Die Firma snowflake productions gmbh hat sich daher entschlossen, die interaktive Datenbank «Vornamen in der Schweiz» wieder ins Leben zu rufen. Als Datenquelle dient die vom BFS zur Verfügung gestellte Statistik der Bevölkerung und Haushalte (STATPOP 2015). Angezeigt werden von der Suchmaschine sämtliche Vornamen, die mindestens drei Mal vorkommen. So kann in der Datenbank die Häufigkeit von 56’890 Vornamen mit Wohnsitz in der Schweiz verglichen werden. Mit dem interaktiven Tool lässt sich die Hitparade der beliebtesten Vornamen der Neugeborenen auch nach Kantonen und einzelnen Sprachregionen aufschlüsseln. Dass ein so stark frequentiertes Tool des Bundes mit dem Relaunch der Website plötzlich nicht mehr zur Verfügung steht, kann Adrian Zimmermann, CEO der snowflake productions gmbh nicht nachvollziehen. “Das Vornamen-Tool des BFS war über alle Massen beliebt. Ich habe es selber für die Namenswahl meines Sohnes benutzt. Viele Bekannte haben als werdende Eltern intensiv mit dem Tool Namensrecherche betrieben.” Als klar wurde, dass der neue Webauftritt des BFS kein Budget mehr für die Neuprogrammierung des Tools zulässt, war der Entschluss schnell gefällt. “Ersatz muss her – und wenn das der Bund nicht macht, nehmen wir das in die Hand!”, so Adrian Zimmermann. Die aktuelle interaktive Datenbank ist komplett neu programmiert und wird in den nächsten Wochen und Monaten auch laufend ausgebaut werden. Die Umsetzung des neuen Vornamen-Tools ist so konzipiert, dass dieses sogar in den bestehenden Webauftritt des BFS nahtlos integriert werden könnte. Performance: aus der Historie gelernt Im Jahr 2013 brachen die Server beim Bundesamt für Statistik schon kurz nach der Aufschaltung des Vornamen-Tools zusammen. Aufgrund der «sehr grossen Nachfrage» sei die Applikation «momentan» nicht verfügbar, teilte das BFS auf seiner Website im April 2013 mit. Tausende hatten offenbar gleichzeitig online nach der landesweiten Verbreitung ihres Vornamens gesucht. Dafür, dass dies bei der neuen interaktiven Datenbank nicht wieder passiert, ist gesorgt. “Wir haben bei der Umsetzung auf leichtgewichtige Technologien gesetzt um auch bei grossen Zugriffsspitzen die Daten performant ausliefern zu können.”, so der Applikationsentwickler Simone Cogno. Für solche Anwendungen bietet sich das auch hier eingesetzte Node.js an. Node.js ist eine Software-Plattform mit eventbasierter Architektur. Verwendung findet Node.js in der Entwicklung serverseitiger JavaScript-Anwendungen, die grosse Datenmengen in Echtzeit bewältigen müssen. Open Data: für alle nutzbar Seit heute kann das Vornamen-Tool unter der Adresse https://vornamen.opendata.ch wieder genutzt werden. Adrian Zimmermann: “Wir setzen seit über 17 Jahren stark auf Open Source und unterstützen daher tatkräftig offene Standards und Open Source Software fachlich, organisatorisch und auf politischer Ebene.” Mit der Neuauflage des Vornamen-Tools möchte snowflake ihren Teil zu Transparenz, Innovation und Effizienz beitragen. Responsive: auch auf mobilen Geräten nutzbar Damit zukünftig auch auf mobilen Geräten dieser “Beschäftigung” nachgegangen werden kann, wurde gleich zu Beginn der Neurealisation auf ein Responsive Ansatz der Applikation gesetzt. “Mit Twitter Bootstrap und AngularJ S sorgen wir dafür, dass die Applikation auch auf Smartphones und Tablets gut nutzbar ist”, führt Nicolas Karrer (Applikationsentwickler) aus. Noch gibt es Potential zur Verbesserung, vor allem für die Darstellung auf Smartphones. Diese Optimierungen werden im Laufe der nächsten Wochen laufend vorgenommen werden. Zukunft Die Entwicklung des interaktiven Tools macht allen Beteiligten grossen Spass. In den letzten Jahren hat snowflake viele komplexe und herausfordernde Web-Applikationen für Kunden entwickelt. Doch bei wenigen war der spielerische und explorative Aspekt so ausgeprägt. Die interaktive Datenbank «Vornamen in der Schweiz» birgt noch viel Potential für “Daten-Spielereien”. Dementsprechend wird snowflake das Vornamen-Tool auch laufend weiter entwickeln und sobald verfügbar auch mit neuen Daten des BFS aktualisieren.

Das Warten hat ein Ende: Präsentationen sind jetzt online!

murielstaub - July 7, 2017 in Daten, event, Luzern, National

Die Opendata.ch/2017 Konferenz hat am Dienstag, 27. Juni 2017 an der Hochschule Luzern stattgefunden. Wir haben einen inspirierenden Tag mit vielen interessanten Gesprächen hinter uns und danken herzlich, dass Sie so zahlreich erschienen sind. Keynotes, Fotos und weitere Unterlagen der Konferenz stehen Ihnen nun hier zur Verfügung.
Opendata.ch & Hochschule Luzern
Vormittagsprogramm: Keynote von Peter Delfosse
«Open Data im Machtgefüge der digitalen Transformation»

Keynote by Simon Hodson
«Open and FAIR Research Data: how do we get there?»
Keynote von Rahel Ryf
«Open-Data-Plattform öV Schweiz: Mit Open Data die digitale Zukunft des öV gestalten.»
Keynote von Andreas Kellerhals
«Open (Government) Data 2014 – 2018: Überblick über den aktuellen Stand und die Aus- und Absichten»
Keynote von Sylke Gruhnwald
«Journalismus und offene Daten: Daten für alle!»
Keynote von Pascal Jenny
«Wie der Schweizer Bergtourismus von Open Data profitieren kann.» Mitgliederversammlung von Opendata.ch
Das Protokoll steht demnächst hier zur Verfügung. Nachmittags-Workshop Open Data Infrastructure 
– Oleg Lavrovsky: Unconditional Basic Infrastructure
– Andreas Amsler: Die Zukunft von Open Data Katalogen
– Barnaby Skinner: Open data Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
– Juan Pablo Lovato: What Publishing Open Government Data Really Looks Like – Barriers and Sustainable Solutions. Nachmittags-Workshop Open Science
– Prof. Dr. Alexander Grossmann: Open Access und die Zukunft des wissenschaftlichen Publizierens
– Dr. Raymond Werlen: Stratégie nationale suisse sur l‘Open Access
– Chiara Gabella: Swiss Institute for Bioinformatics (SIB)
– Günter Hipler: Data Processing als Kern / Basis einer offenen Schweizer Metadatenplattform

Nachmittags-Workshop Open Tourism & Transport Data
– Christian Trachsel: Herausforderungen, Ziele & Zukunft mit Open Data bei SBB
– Christian Helbling: Transport API
– Stefan Keller: Nutzung von OpenStreetMap für Tourismus und Transport
– Andreas Liebrich: OpenData im Tourismus: (Un-)genutztes Potenzial bis à go go? 

Nachmittags-Workshop: Open Smart Cities
Prof. Edy Portmann: Smart City: ein Konzept
– Astrid Habenstein: Open Smart City
– Christian GeesFixMyStreet – Aktueller Stand in Zürich
– Dr. rer. nat. Ladan Pooyan-Weihs: Smarte Leute leben in Smarten Cities Nachmittags-Workshop Open Food Data
– Florian Wieser: Business Innovation food.opendata – An introduction. Closing Keynote:
Prof. Martin Vetterli, President of the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL
«The role of “open” in digital Switzerland»

Liste der Teilnehmenden:
Hier können Sie die Liste der Teilnehmenden einsehen, die eingewilligt haben, dass wir ihr Daten zugänglich machen.

Twitter:
Schauen Sie hier, was am Tag der Konferenz auf Twitter diskutiert wurde.

Medienmitteilung:
Die Medienmitteilung, die vor der Konferenz verschickt wurde, ist hier verfügbar.

Bildergalerie:
 
 
 
< p style="text-align: justify">Partner:
Die Open Data 2017 Konferenz wurde gemeinsam von der Hochschule Luzern und dem Schweizer Verein Opendata.ch durchgeführt. Wir danken unseren Partnern opendata.swissHasler StiftungSeantisnine.chSwissbib.ch und OpenDataSoft für deren Unterstützung – sie haben die Durchführung der Open Data Konferenz 2017 möglich gemacht.

< p style="text-align: justify">
  
 
< p style="text-align: justify">
  
 

Search.ch rettet transport.opendata.ch

Hannes Gassert - June 21, 2017 in Daten

transport.opendata.ch ist der wohl erfolgreichste Open Data Dienst der Schweiz: Der Webservice für ÖV-Daten hat bis heute über eine Milliarde Anfragen beantwortet, bis zu 1.8 Millionen am Tag. Die Schnittstelle stellt einen höchst entwicklerfreundlichen Zugang sicher zu Hintergrundsystemen der SBB — diese stehen aber kurz vor der Abschaltung. Um den Zugang weiterhin sicherzustellen, den eine grosse —und wachsende— Zahl innovativer Projekte wie etwa das Wander-Startup WeHike oder der Augmented Reality Fahrplan Departures benötigen, stellt search.ch neu ihr eigenes Backend zur Verfügung, das dank der neuen Echtzeitdaten von opentransportdata.swiss ebenfalls minutengenaue Fahrplanabfragen und Streckenberechnungen leisten kann. Dadurch ändert sich für Nutzerinnen und Nutzer von transport.opendata.ch so wenig wie absolut möglich, die Schnittstelle ist weitgehend identisch, proprietäre Angaben der SBB wie etwa der Auslastungsindikator sind aber nicht mehr in den Daten enthalten. Eine Liste aktuell bekannter Probleme findet sich auf Github. Die neue Umsetzung kann ab sofort unter transport-beta.opendata.ch getestet werden, die Umstellung auf die neue Lösung erfolgt am 31.Juli 2017. Der Dienst wird von search.ch und Opendata.ch als “best-effort” Leistung angeboten, ohne Garantien für die Verfügbarkeit oder die Qualität der Daten und Berechnungen. Für Anwendungsfälle, die ein erhöhtes Abfragevolumen oder eine garantierte Verfügbarkeit benötigen empfiehlt Opendata.ch die Viadi API sowie die offiziellen Datenangebote von opentransportdata.swiss und  data.sbb.ch. Für weitere Fragen zur Umstellung steht die Google Gruppe der Open Transport Data Working Group zur Verfügung, auch an der kommenden Opendata.ch/2017 Konferenz wird die Lage in einem Workshop thematisiert. Opendata.ch dankt dem Team von search.ch und Fabian Vogler dem langjährigen Betreuer der Schnittstelle — offene Verkehrsdaten sind essentiell für die Zukunft der “Smart City” und weit darüber hinaus, und dank Schnittstellen wie transport.opendata.ch werden diese einfach für alle Entwicklerinnen und Entwickler zugänglich.

Open Data Konferenz am 27. Juni in Luzern!

murielstaub - May 9, 2017 in Allgemein, Daten, event, food, Forschung, Luzern, Medien, National

Am 27. Juni 2017 wird die Weiterentwicklung von Open Data in der Schweiz diskutiert und wir dringen gemeinsam in neue Gebiete vor: VertreterInnen der digitalen Gesellschaft vermitteln die Themen Open Smart Cities, Open Tourism & Transport Data, Open Science und Open Food Data. Als Teilnehmende vernetzen Sie sich mit einem äusserst vielfältigen Publikum aus Verwaltung, Wirtschaft, Wissenschaft, Politik, Journalismus und IT.


Opendata.ch/2017
 ist die führende Konferenz der Schweiz rund um das Thema Open Data. Dieses Jahr wird diese Konferenz gemeinsam von dem interdisziplinäre Schwerpunkt «Datenwelten» der Hochschule Luzern und Opendata.ch durchgeführt. 
Danke an opendata.swissHasler StiftungSeantis and nine.ch für die wertvolle Partnerschaft und dafür, dass sie die Opendata.ch/2017 möglich machen.

< p style="text-align: justify">