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Dazzle Ships

- April 19, 2012 in dazzle camouflage, Images, Images-20th, Images-Photography, non-article, norman wilkinson, world war 2

Dazzle camouflage (also known as Razzle Dazzle or Dazzle painting) was a military camouflage paint scheme used on ships, extensively during World War I and to a lesser extent in World War II. The idea is credited to the artist Norman Wilkinson who was serving in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve when he had the idea in 1917. After the Allied Navies failed to develop effective means to disguise ships in all weathers, the dazzle technique was employed, not in order to conceal the ship, but rather to make it difficult for the enemy to estimate its type, size, speed and direction of travel. After seeing a canon painted in dazzle camouflage trundling through the streets of Paris, Picasso is reported to have taken credit for the innovation which seemed to him a quintessentially Cubist technique.

(All images via Wikimedia Commons)

HMS Argus (1918)


USS Suboney (1918)


HMS Badsworth (1941)


HMS Furious (1918)


HMS Nairana (1917)


HMS Kildangan (1918)


HMS London (1918)


HMS Pegasus (1917)


RMS Olympic (c.1918) - The identical sister ship to RMS Titanic


HMS Rocksand (c.1918)


S.S. Alloway (1918)


USS Siboney (1918)


HMS Underwing (c.1918)


USS Charles S Sperry (1944)


USS Leviathan (1918)


USS Orizaba (1918)


USS Smith (1944)


USS St. George (c.1944)


USS West Apaum (1918)


USS West Mahomet (1918)


USS Wilhelmina (1918)


USS Nebraska (1918)













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Dazzle Ships

- April 19, 2012 in dazzle camouflage, Images, Images-20th, Images-Photography, non-article, norman wilkinson, world war 1, world war 2

Dazzle camouflage (also known as Razzle Dazzle or Dazzle painting) was a military camouflage paint scheme used on ships, extensively during World War I and to a lesser extent in World War II. The idea is credited to the artist Norman Wilkinson who was serving in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve when he had the idea in 1917. After the Allied Navies failed to develop effective means to disguise ships in all weathers, the dazzle technique was employed, not in order to conceal the ship, but rather to make it difficult for the enemy to estimate its type, size, speed and direction of travel. After seeing a canon painted in dazzle camouflage trundling through the streets of Paris, Picasso is reported to have taken credit for the innovation which seemed to him a quintessentially Cubist technique.

(All images via Wikimedia Commons)

HMS Argus (1918)


USS Suboney (1918)


HMS Badsworth (1941)


HMS Furious (1918)


HMS Nairana (1917)


HMS Kildangan (1918)


HMS London (1918)


HMS Pegasus (1917)


RMS Olympic (c.1918) - The identical sister ship to RMS Titanic


HMS Rocksand (c.1918)


S.S. Alloway (1918)


USS Siboney (1918)


HMS Underwing (c.1918)


USS Charles S Sperry (1944)


USS Leviathan (1918)


USS Orizaba (1918)


USS Smith (1944)


USS St. George (c.1944)


USS West Apaum (1918)


USS West Mahomet (1918)


USS Wilhelmina (1918)


USS Nebraska (1918)













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flattr this!