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Cosmography Manuscript (12th Century)

- July 25, 2018 in astrology, astronomy, cosmography, diagrams

Wonderful series of medieval cosmographic diagrams and schemas sourced from a late 12th-century English manuscript.

Cosmography Manuscript (12th Century)

- July 25, 2018 in astrology, astronomy, best of celestial, cosmography, diagrams

Wonderful series of medieval cosmographic diagrams and schemas sourced from a late 12th-century English manuscript.

George Mayerle’s Eye Test Chart (ca. 1907)

- December 12, 2017 in charts, diagrams, eye charts, eyes, george mayerle, graphic design, optometry, symbols

This fantastic eye chart — measuring 22 by 28 inches with a positive version on one side and negative on the other — is the work of German optometrist and American Optometric Association member George Mayerle, who was working in San Francisco at end of the nineteenth century, just when optometry was beginning to professionalise. […]

George Mayerle’s Eye Test Chart (ca. 1907)

- December 12, 2017 in charts, diagrams, eye charts, eyes, george mayerle, graphic design, optometry, symbols

This fantastic eye chart — measuring 22 by 28 inches with a positive version on one side and negative on the other — is the work of German optometrist and American Optometric Association member George Mayerle, who was working in San Francisco at end of the nineteenth century, just when optometry was beginning to professionalise. […]

Jacob Sarnoff and the Strange World of Anatomical Filmmaking

- September 1, 2015 in animation, arteries, blood, circulatory sustem, diagrams, early medical film, heart, jacob sarnoff, medical animation, medical diagrams, veins

US NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE - Miriam Posner on what led a 1920s Brooklyn surgeon to remove the veins from a day-old infant, mount them on a board, and film them being pumped with air.

Jacob Sarnoff and the Strange World of Anatomical Filmmaking

- September 1, 2015 in animation, arteries, blood, circulatory sustem, diagrams, early medical film, heart, jacob sarnoff, medical animation, medical diagrams, veins

US NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE - Miriam Posner on what led a 1920s Brooklyn surgeon to remove the veins from a day-old infant, mount them on a board, and film them being pumped with air.

Phrenology Diagrams from Vaught’s Practical Character Reader (1902)

- March 19, 2013 in character, collections, diagrams, Images, Images-20th, Images-People, Images-Science, Images: Miscellaneous, phrenology, pseudo-science, psychology

Illustrations from Vaught’s Practical Character Reader, a book on phrenology by L. A. Vaught published in 1902. As he confidently states in his Preface: The purpose of this book is to acquaint all with the elements of human nature and enable them to read these elements in all men, women and children in all countries. At least fifty thousand careful examinations have been made to prove the truthfulness of the nature and location of these elements. More than a million observations have been made to confirm the examinations. Therefore, it is given the world to be depended upon. Taken in its entirety it is absolutely reliable. Its facts can be completely demonstrated by all who will take the unprejudiced pains to do so. It is ready for use. It is practical. Use it. The theory that one can ascertain a person’s character by the shape of their features is disturbing to say the least. You can see the book in its entirety, including many more diagrams, over in our post in the Texts collection. (All images taken from the book housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the Library of Congress. Hat-tip to Pinterest user Lisa M. Finnegan.) HELP TO [...]

The Diagrammatic Writings of an Asylum Patient (1870)

- March 12, 2013 in calligraphy, collections, diagrams, Images, Images-19th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images: Miscellaneous, insane asylum, outsider art, writing

These two images are from the book On the Writing of the Insane (1870) by G. Mackenzie Bacon, medical superintendant at an asylum (now Fulbourn Hospital) located near Cambridge, England. The pictures are the product of a “respectable artisan of considerable intelligence [who] was sent to the Cambridgeshire Asylum after being nearly three years in a melancholy mood”. Bacon describes how the unnamed patient, for the two years he was committed, spent “much of his time writing — sometimes verses, at others long letters of the most rambling character, and in drawing extraordinary diagrams.” The two images shown here were drawn on both sides of the same small half sheet of paper, and the patient, “as though anxious, in the exuberance of his fancy, to make the fullest use of his opportunities, [...] filled up every morsel of the surface — to the very edge — not leaving an atom of margin.” Bacon goes on to explain that the man, after leaving the asylum, went “to work at his trade, and, by steady application, succeeded in arriving at a certain degree of prosperity, but some two or three years later he began to write very strangely again, and had some [...]

Olympic Diving Diagrams (1912)

- August 11, 2012 in diagrams, diving, Images, Images-20th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Illustrations, non-article, olympics

Diagrams showing the trajectory of the major dives as performed at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm.

(All images taken from The Fifth Olympiad: the Official Report of the Olympic Games of Stockholm 1912 housed by the Internet Archive, donated by the University of Toronto).

































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Arabic Machine Manuscript

- July 9, 2012 in arabic manuscript, diagrams, Images, Images-17th, Images-18th, Images-Illumination, Images-Science, machinery, non-article, schematics

Images from an Arabic manuscript featuring schematics for water powered systems, pulleys and gearing mechanisms. The date is unknown but is thought to be from sometime between the 16th and 19th century.

(All images from Max Planck Digital Library via Wikimedia Commons).













































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