You are browsing the archive for diary.

Pepys’s Ghost (1899)

- October 2, 2018 in diarists, diary, racist, samuel pepys

In this strangest of diaries, the author and adventurer Edwin Emerson Jr voices one year in his life through the mouth of Samuel Pepys.

Hieroglyphic Journal of a Voyage to the Caribbean (1815)

- September 6, 2017 in carribean, diary, hieroglyphics, hieroglyphs, jamaica, journal, madeira, symbols, travel journal, west indies

Unusual and delightfully ingenious book which employs a series of "hieroglyphic" plates to frame an account of a trade voyage to the Caribbean.

Hieroglyphic Journal of a Voyage to the Caribbean (1815)

- September 6, 2017 in carribean, diary, hieroglyphics, hieroglyphs, jamaica, journal, madeira, symbols, travel journal, west indies

Unusual and delightfully ingenious book which employs a series of "hieroglyphic" plates to frame an account of a trade voyage to the Caribbean.

Hieroglyphic Journal of a Voyage to the Caribbean (1815)

- September 6, 2017 in carribean, diary, hieroglyphics, hieroglyphs, jamaica, journal, madeira, symbols, travel journal, west indies

Unusual and delightfully ingenious book which employs a series of "hieroglyphic" plates to frame an account of a trade voyage to the Caribbean.

Queen Victoria’s Teenage Diaries (1912)

- August 20, 2015 in diary, prince albert, queen victoria

Excerpts from the teenage diaries of Queen Victoria , spanning from 1832, when Victoria was 13-years-old, to 1840, the same year that she married her cousin Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha at the age of 20.

Queen Victoria’s Teenage Diaries (1912)

- August 20, 2015 in diary, prince albert, queen victoria

Excerpts from the teenage diaries of Queen Victoria , spanning from 1832, when Victoria was 13-years-old, to 1840, the same year that she married her cousin Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha at the age of 20.

Writing his Life through the Other: The Anthropology of Malinowski

- January 22, 2014 in anthropology, Articles, bronislaw malinowski, diary, ethnography, History, Science, trobriand islands

Last year saw the works of Bronislaw Malinowski – father of modern anthropology – enter the public domain in many countries around the world. Michael W. Young explores the personal crisis plaguing the Polish-born anthropologist at the end of his first major stint of ethnographic immersion in the Trobriand Islands, a period of self-doubt glimpsed through entries in his diary – the most infamous, most nakedly honest document in the annals of social anthropology.

Letters to my sister of our experiences on our first trip to Europe, 1913

- December 29, 2013 in 1913, collections, diary, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Europe, first world war, Internet Archive, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Non-fiction, Underlying Work: PD US, University of Toronto Libraries, world war one, ww1

Letters to my sister of our experiences on our first trip to Europe 1913, by Lilian McCarron; publishing date most likely 1914, publisher unknown. A book of letters written by (the American or perhaps Canadian) Lilian McCarron to her sister detailing a trip she made around Europe in the latter half of 1913. A year later and Europe would be plunged into the beginnings of the First World War which would last 4 years and claim the lives of more than 9 million soldiers and devastate the lands on which it was played out. A certain sense of dramatic irony permeates the diary entries now, in which she describes the “pleasant” and “charming” cities of France and Germany, knowing as we do the horrors that would come in the following years. McCarron spends a large proportion of the trip in Germany, and in particular Berlin, arriving there only a few days after a military airship (a Zeppelin, the kind which would be instrumental in WW1) had crashed killing many experienced German Navy personnel. Her trip also coincided with the Empress’s birthday which saw much of the army on the streets, a sight which gave McCarron the impression that Berlin was […]

Extracts from the Endeavour Journal of Joseph Banks (1769)

- April 5, 2013 in captain cook, collections, diary, joseph banks, journal, surfing, Tahiti, texts, Texts: 18th, Texts: Non-fiction

Appointed as the expedition’s official botanist, a 25 year old Joseph Banks travelled on Captain Cook’s first great voyage to the South Pacific in 1768. After landing on the island of Tahiti, Banks was soon to become an invaluable member of the crew by virtue of the friendly relations he struck up with the islanders; a mutual trust he built up through his openness, natural curiosity and fascination with their customs and way of life. In his willingness to learn their language, eat their food, sleep in their huts, record their customs and partake in their rituals, Banks was pioneering a new kind of science – that of ethnology. As the weeks progressed his botanical observations increasingly gave way to a study of the people (“studies” that were not always at arm’s length!). His experiences in his three month stay on the island are recorded in his Endeavour Journal. The journal is unique in character, not merely in terms of its content but also, as the writer Richard Holmes comments, “for their racy style, appalling spelling and non-existent punctuation”. Below are a few choice extracts, highlighted by Richard Holmes in his (highly recommnded) The Age of Wonder – a book [...]

Diary Days from Christmas Past

- December 18, 2012 in christmas, collections, diarists, diary, john adams, samuel pepys, texts, Texts: 16th and older, Texts: 17th, Texts: 18th, Texts: 19th, Texts: 20th, Texts: Miscellaneous, Texts: Non-fiction

With December 25th fast approaching we have put together a little collection of entries for Christmas Day from an eclectic mix of different diaries spanning five centuries, from 1599 to 1918. Amid famed diarists such as the wife-beating Samuel Pepys, the distinctly non-festive John Adams, and the rhapsodic Thoreau, there are a sprinkling of daily jottings from relative unknowns – many speaking apart from loved ones, at war, sea or in foreign climes. All diaries are housed at the Internet Archive – click the link below each extract to take you to the source. Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!