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Data is a Team Sport: One on One with Friedhelm Weinberg

- July 28, 2017 in Capacity Building, Data Blog, documentation, Event report, Fabriders, human rights, research, software development, Team Sport

Data is a Team Sport is our open-research project exploring the data literacy eco-system and how it is evolving in the wake of post-fact, fake news and data-driven confusion.  We are producing a series of videos, blog posts and podcasts based on a series of online conversations we are having with data literacy practitioners. To subscribe to the podcast series, cut and paste the following link into your podcast manager : http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:311573348/sounds.rss or find us in the iTunes Store and Stitcher. Friedhelm Weinberg is the Executive Director of Human Rights Information and Documentation Systems (HURIDOCS), an NGO that supports organisations and individuals to gather, analyse and harness information to promote and protect human rights.  In this conversation we take a look at what it takes to be both a tool developer and a capacity builder, and how the two disciplines can inform and build upon each other.  Some of the main points:
  • The capacity building work needs to come first and inform the tool development.
  • It’s critical that human rights defenders have a clear understanding of what they want to do with the data before they start collecting it.
  • It’s critical for human rights defenders to have their facts straight as this counts the most in international courts of law, and cuts through ‘fake news.’
  • Machine learning has enormous potential in documenting human rights abuses in being able to process large amount of case work.
  • They have been successful in bringing developers in-house by making efforts to get them to better understand how the capacity builders work and also vice-versa.

Specific projects within Huridocs he talked about:

  • Uwazi is an open-source solution for building and sharing document collections
  • The Collaboratory is their knowledge sharing network for practitioners focusing on information management and human rights documentation.

Readings/Resources that are inspiring his work:

View the full online conversation:

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Data is a Team Sport: One on One with Friedhelm Weinberg

- July 28, 2017 in Capacity Building, Data Blog, documentation, Event report, Fabriders, human rights, research, software development, Team Sport

Data is a Team Sport is our open-research project exploring the data literacy eco-system and how it is evolving in the wake of post-fact, fake news and data-driven confusion.  We are producing a series of videos, blog posts and podcasts based on a series of online conversations we are having with data literacy practitioners. To subscribe to the podcast series, cut and paste the following link into your podcast manager : http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:311573348/sounds.rss or find us in the iTunes Store and Stitcher. Friedhelm Weinberg is the Executive Director of Human Rights Information and Documentation Systems (HURIDOCS), an NGO that supports organisations and individuals to gather, analyse and harness information to promote and protect human rights.  In this conversation we take a look at what it takes to be both a tool developer and a capacity builder, and how the two disciplines can inform and build upon each other.  Some of the main points:
  • The capacity building work needs to come first and inform the tool development.
  • It’s critical that human rights defenders have a clear understanding of what they want to do with the data before they start collecting it.
  • It’s critical for human rights defenders to have their facts straight as this counts the most in international courts of law, and cuts through ‘fake news.’
  • Machine learning has enormous potential in documenting human rights abuses in being able to process large amount of case work.
  • They have been successful in bringing developers in-house by making efforts to get them to better understand how the capacity builders work and also vice-versa.

Specific projects within Huridocs he talked about:

  • Uwazi is an open-source solution for building and sharing document collections
  • The Collaboratory is their knowledge sharing network for practitioners focusing on information management and human rights documentation.

Readings/Resources that are inspiring his work:

View the full online conversation:

Flattr this!

OpenGLAM Documentation updated

- May 12, 2016 in documentation, eSpace, Featured

Last summer Open Knowledge launched the Open Content Exchange Platform, a resource developed within the E-Space (Europeana Space) project that collects materials on the reuse of open cultural heritage content. It is incorporated in the E-Space Content Space, where you can find a variety of resources on licensing, IP and copyright. At the end of April 2016 we completed our work […]

OpenGLAM Documentation updated

- May 12, 2016 in documentation, eSpace, Featured

Last summer Open Knowledge launched the Open Content Exchange Platform, a resource developed within the E-Space (Europeana Space) project that collects materials on the reuse of open cultural heritage content. It is incorporated in the E-Space Content Space, where you can find a variety of resources on licensing, IP and copyright. At the end of April 2016 we completed our work […]

New Topic Report: Public Sector Information in Cultural Heritage Institutions

- July 8, 2014 in documentation, Featured, Front Page

This week a new Topic Report has been published on the ePSI Platform about public sector information in cultural heritage institutions. The report discusses the current state of the digital cultural heritage landscape in Europe and looks at what the recently accepted amendments to the PSI Directive mean for the sector. What is Public Sector […]

Video skillshare: how to make your OKFestival video

- June 9, 2014 in communications, community, documentation, News and Info, skillshare, Video

This is a cross-post from the Open Knowledge blog, by Heather Leson, Community Engagement Director at Open Knowledge. Happy June! We have a special Community Sessions to announce. OKFestival is almost a month away. Videos are key for storytelling, so we are hosting a Video Skillshare to help us all learn. Take a Video: Preparing […]

Concerns and reasons not to open up GLAM data. Part 1 – Fear of Misuse

- June 21, 2013 in documentation, Featured

Over the last year, members of the OpenGLAM initiative have been talking with many representatives from cultural heritage institutions. We have had many interesting discussions about opening up collections and tried to overcome the many reasons and concerns institutions have not to open up their data and content. In this blogpost we will talk about these different reasons and try to give advice or solutions.
'Internetcrimineel' taken by Verbeeldingskr8. CC-BY-SA

‘Internetcrimineel’ taken by Verbeeldingskr8. CC-BY-SA

In most cases, we talked about the major legal and technical questions, which we have written extensively about on the OpenGLAM blog. But very often, also other concerns within the institution plays a role in not opening up the data. When we started writing these down, we quickly realised that this was too much for a single blogpost. We will therefore explore these concerns and their possible answers in series. We will start off with a couple of concerns which can be summarised as ‘the fear of misuse’ – intentional or unintentional. Many institutions fear that by opening up their data and making it freely available, they will lose track of what happens with their data, it will be used in the wrong context, by people with bad intentions, and the data will be ripped apart, losing all it’s value.

People will misinterpret the data

By opening up the data you allow the user to access and re-use it without asking the institution first. It is hard for the institution to keep track of what happens with their data and how it is interpreted. While the curator has carefully selected and managed its collection, putting it freely online would allow the user to download it, and use and interpret it in ways that you would have never thought off. The first step in overcoming this problem is documentation about how you think the data should be interpreted. As a curator you know most about how the collection is structured and why certain decisions were made, be prepared to help people answering their questions and correct people. At the same time, it is very likely that somebody out there knows more about your data than you do. By offering them a way to access your data and working with it, you allow them to spot errors or missing information, which they then can return to you. Several institutions have had great successes improving their collection and metadata by allowing the community to re-use it. Finally, publishing it yourself might actually prevent wrong interpretations. When the data is online but not open, it can still be acquired via less legal means (scraping, or just right-click, save). By keeping the publishing and updating in your own hand, you can quickly point to the source data of your institution to refute the wrong interpretation.

People with bad intentions will use my data in the wrong way

We see this concern mainly at institutions who have sensible material such as war museums. The fear is that people or groups with bad intentions will use their data in a harmful or wrong way. Very often, institutions add a sentence to their license to cover this, such as this example which says: ‘You may not use the photographs to mislead people. You may not use the photographs for unlawful or inappropriate purposes.’ This kind of restriction is very hard to interpret, after all, who decides that I am using this picture inappropriate? At the same time, the data can already be obtained by other slightly harder means as written above and it is incredibly hard for an institution to track this, let alone to get the user to take it down. By adding these restrictions, the average user who wants to research or use this data in a proper way is disadvantaged as it makes it not easier to understand the restrictions. At the same time, the license is not going to prevent people who want to do harm of doing it. Also, when people decide to use your material in a really harmful way, there are other laws than copyright that can deal with this kind of misuse such as the several anti-racism and discrimination acts. As a final remark we would like to highlight again the importance of well maintained metadata. Opening data is not about dumping it on the web and never look at it again. It is up to the institution to publish this with the relevant information. Tell the user what they can expect, what its flaws are, and who to contact when they have questions. Only this way both the users and the institutions can really benefit from an open culture ecosystem. For more info about opening up your data the right way, see the OpenGLAM Principles. If you are an institution and have questions, feel free to get in touch directly. See also our documentation section.

School of Open launches with OpenGLAM course

- March 12, 2013 in documentation, News

This week is Open Education Week and to celebrate the first courses on the School of Open are launched. The School offers courses on the meaning, application, and impact of “openness” in the digital age and its benefit to creative endeavors, education, research, and beyond. It is coordinated by P2PU and Creative Commons. The School offers all kinds of courses related to openness. You can learn about creative commons licenses, open data in science, copyright for educators, and now also how to open your cultural institution’s data.

Open Up your Institution’s Data course on the School of Open

The ‘Open Data for GLAMs‘ course is an adaptation of the masterclasses that the Open Culture Data initiative gave to several institutions. By releasing their course material, every memory institutions can now start to open up their cultural data as open culture data. Together with several partners from the OpenGLAM network we edited the course and it is now ready for anybody who wants to open up. The course will guide you through the different steps towards open data and provide you with extensive background information on how to handle copyright and other possible issues.

School of Open is offering free online courses on what “open” means and how it can help you.

The different steps will force you to think about different aspects of your data that could lead to a more efficient data infrastructure and a coherent data policy with great internal benefits for your institution. We are very curious about your experiences and happy to help if you have any questions. We also would really like to sit down with you (in person or virtual) and go through the course together . So if you are interested, get in touch!

Consequences, risks and side-effects of the license module “non-commercial use only”

- January 8, 2013 in documentation, Featured

In 2012, a group of German copyright experts released in collaboration with Wikimedia the German document “Folgen, Risiken und Nebenwirkungen der Bedingung Nicht-Kommerziell – NC” (Consequences, Risks, and side-effects of the license module Non-Commercial – NC). In this document, they explain all consequences of choosing a CC license variant restricted to non- commercial use only (NC) and make clear why its usage is often not necessary and even a bad idea for artists and institutions.
The public licenses developed by Creative Commons (CC) are tools to make creative works available for free use under certain conditions. As rights holders have different needs and motives, CC offers six different license variants. Some of the most popular license variants include the condition that the licensed works must not be used commercially. This has far-reaching and often unintended consequences for the dissemination of the respective works and sometimes even entirely thwarts what the licensor wants to achieve by choosing a CC license.
This brochure wants to offer information on consequences, risks and side-effects of the restrictive CC license variants that don‘t allow commercial use
As often discussed on the OKFN blog, the Creative Commons NC-license can not be considered a true open license as it is not mutually compatible with for example, material with a CC Attribution-Sharealike (BY-SA) license. After reading this document which was published under a cc-by license we decided that it was worth it to create an English version as well. We put out a request to the German OKFN volunteers and got a couple of responses. Within a few days the complete document was translated. Then, the original authors were consulted and they agreed to proofread the document. This was also a great opportunity to implement some of the comments they received from the German Wikimedia community after publishing. With the help of Wikimedia Deutschland, we were able to fit the document in the same design as the original. And now in early 2013, we are very happy to announce the final version of the document translated to English. Download “Consequences, Risks, and side-effects of the license module Non-Commercial – NC” here. Again we want to thank the OKFN community so much for achieving this great publication. Special thanks goes out to Thomas Hirsch who translated the majority of the document. Want to help spread Open Knowledge in your own language? Join the Task Force!