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Join us for open data day 2018 in Copenhagen

- February 13, 2018 in åben data, begivenhed, english, event, Open Data Day

Open Data Day is coming up. This year we have partnered with Open4Citizens and Ethos Lab to host an event Friday 2 March in Copenhagen (see details below). At the event we will celebrate open data with informal socializing and short inspiring talks on open data. At the event we will announce the winner of the Danish Open Data Award 2018. The Danish Open Data Award is a newly initiated award that will be given to a person or a group for an extraordinary effort to promote open data in Denmark. Nominations will soon be published.   When: Friday, March 2, at 16.30-19.00
Where: IT-Universitetet, Rued Langgaards Vej 7, Copenhagen
Open data day 2018

Open data day 2018

No entrance fee, everybody is welcome, talks will be in English. The event will be hosted by ETHOS Lab, Opendatalab Copenhagen and Open Knowledge Denmark   Link: Facebook-event

Join us for open data day 2018 in Copenhagen

- February 13, 2018 in åben data, begivenhed, english, event, Open Data Day

Open data day 2018

Open data day 2018

Open Data Day is coming up. This year we have partnered with Open4Citizens and Ethos Lab to host an event Friday 2 March in Copenhagen (see details below). At the event we will celebrate open data with informal socializing and short inspiring talks on open data. At the event we will announce the winner of the Danish Open Data Award 2018. The Danish Open Data Award is a newly initiated award that will be given to a person or a group for an extraordinary effort to promote open data in Denmark. Nominations will soon be published. Open Data Day will be celebrated with events around the globe. At the time of writing 156 events are planned to take place in places like Kyrgyzstan, Zambia, the Phillipines, the US and in Copenhagen, Denmark.   When: Friday, March 2, at 16.30-19.00
Where: IT-Universitetet, Rued Langgaards Vej 7, Copenhagen No entrance fee, everybody is welcome, talks will be in English. The event will be hosted by ETHOS Lab, Opendatalab Copenhagen and Open Knowledge Denmark   Link: Facebook-event

Gæsteindlæg: Something’s (Johnny) Rotten in Denmark

- April 21, 2017 in åben data, english, offentlige data

Dette er et gæsteindlæg af Jason Hare, der er Open Data Evangelist hos OpenDataSoft. I indlægget beskrives initiativet med Københavns “City Data Exchange“, der samler data fra forskellige åbne og lukkede kilder og udgør en form for markedsplads for data. Fra Open Knowledge Danmarks side er vi særligt skeptiske overfor ideen om at tage åbne data offentliggjort på åbne platforme (som Københavns åbne data portal, der er baseret på CKAN) og genpublicere dem bag login og med begrænsning i vilkårene for videreanvendelse. Indlægget blev oprindeligt postet på Jason Hares egen blog og er udtryk for skribentens egne holdninger.

Hitachi Insight Group Repackaging Open Data

Hitachi Insight Group’s City Data Exchange pilot in Copenhagen is the latest attempt at a model of monetization around Open Data. There are some hurdles, both practical and ethical, that this model will have to overcome. Repackaging public data for resell limits re-use, accessibility and may push ethical boundaries when public data is enriched with private data.

I see ethical problems taking two tracks:

  • Personally identifiable information is more likely when public data is enriched with private data and used in a less-than-transparent manner. This is also known as the “Mosaic Effect”. “Mosaic Effect”, small fact, is a term invented by the intelligence community in the US. No longer do we have transparent government, instead we have transparent citizens. For more information on this etymological footnote, read Victor V. Ramraj’s brilliant book Global Anti-Terrorism Law and Policy.
  • Public data, Open Data, has been paid for by taxpayers. The data is a public asset and should not be given away to private sector companies that have no transparency requirements. See Ade Adewunmi’s brilliant piece written on the UK’s Government Digital Service Blog for more on this. Also a blog post I wrote based on my work at the White House Open Data Roundtables in regards to data as an asset on the OpenDataSoft blog.

The Data Exchange Model Already Includes You.

Many years ago I worked as a Vice President for a data exchange company. This company, RateWatch, packaged and resold bank rate data to banks. The banks found it cheaper to buy rates from the largest database of bank rates in the world rather than try to gather the intelligence themselves.

Selling Access is not what Smells About this Deal

APIs usually have tokens and these tokens can be throttled. This is to prevent abuse of the API and the underlying data. Governments that sell a premium access to these API are a different animal to what Hitachi is doing. Consuming millions of rows of data is not something the average person does. Selling access to the API, with a Service Level Agreement (SLA), allows public sector to make the data more reusable.

Local government can do this with other assets: toll roads; industrial use of natural resources; access to medical care; an expectation of public safety. All of these municipal services have a basic free level and a level at which there are additional fees. Consider transportation, if you drive a car you pay taxes and gasoline to drive. Taking a bus is less expensive and there are no taxes. In the same way data can be distributed more or less equally. The real difference is in the velocity of data consumption.

Examples of Companies that Collect and Repackage data:

  • Axiom sells data subscriptions to, among other customers, users of SalesForce.
  • XOR Data Exchange offers customer acquisition risk mitigation through subscriptions to credit profiles of consumers. Your cable company probably uses XOR.
  • BDEX offers persona data including spending habits, entertainment habits and political affiliation.
  • LexisNexis sells data analytics supporting compliance, customer acquisition, fraud detection, health outcomes, identity solutions, investigation, receivables management, risk decisioning and workflow optimization.
  • ESRI repackages public (open) data from US Agencies and offers subscriptions to its ArcGIS online service. The data is now in a non-reusable, proprietary format.
  • Hitachi Insight Group and the City of Copenhagen will collect and resell public data to private interests.

It’s a long and somewhat unsettling list

These companies spend money to gather information about all of us based on our commercial and entertainment habits. They then sell this data to marketing companies looking to remarket to all of us. The deal is we exchange our data in return for small benefits at the gas pump, the grocery store, the movie theatre and probably every place you shop. That is ok. We can opt out. We know it’s happening and we play along.

How the Hitachi Deal Works

The idea of data exchanges has been around probably as long as humans have been writing things down. Now that most of us operate in digital environments on a daily basis, it is not surprising that companies have figured out that data is money.

Hitachi Insight Group approach the City of Copenhagen. The City pledged $1.3 million and Hitachi matched these funds at 2:1. Note again that Hitachi is using money from the [local] government. This money is used to incentivize the private sector to invest money in making the data suitable and reliable for data sharing. In this scheme, the City recovers some of its upfront costs in making the data suitable for release. Hitachi plans to license its technology to other cities with a one time startup fee after which there will be no further obligations on the part of the government.

This implies that all of the revenue then goes back to the Hitachi Group. Hitachi does not know if this is a viable model and neither does the City of Copenhagen. At best, the City achieved a goal of limited value, it recovered some capital. At worst, the city short-circuited its own Smarter City initiative.

When we talked about access to APIs and cities wanting to charge for premium access, we decided that was ok. The City has an obligation to taxpayers to recover any revenue possible. Residents can access the API without a token for research or data storytelling, business can pay a small fee to increase the velocity of the data harvested from the Open Data Portal.

What makes the Hitachi deal so bad for Copenhagen is that it does not solve the data dissemination issue. Hitachi will control the data market and all access to the data.

 Open Knowledge Danmark har også tidligere har et gæsteindlæg om samme emne med titlen: Impressions of City Data Exchange Copenhagen.

Gæsteindlæg: Something’s (Johnny) Rotten in Denmark

- April 21, 2017 in åben data, english, offentlige data

Dette er et gæsteindlæg af Jason Hare, der er Open Data Evangelist hos OpenDataSoft. I indlægget beskrives initiativet med Københavns “City Data Exchange“, der samler data fra forskellige åbne og lukkede kilder og udgør en form for markedsplads for data. Fra Open Knowledge Danmarks side er vi særligt skeptiske overfor ideen om at tage åbne data offentliggjort på åbne platforme (som Københavns åbne data portal, der er baseret på CKAN) og genpublicere dem bag login og med begrænsning i vilkårene for videreanvendelse. Indlægget blev oprindeligt postet på Jason Hares egen blog og er udtryk for skribentens egne holdninger.

Hitachi Insight Group Repackaging Open Data

Hitachi Insight Group’s City Data Exchange pilot in Copenhagen is the latest attempt at a model of monetization around Open Data. There are some hurdles, both practical and ethical, that this model will have to overcome. Repackaging public data for resell limits re-use, accessibility and may push ethical boundaries when public data is enriched with private data.

I see ethical problems taking two tracks:

  • Personally identifiable information is more likely when public data is enriched with private data and used in a less-than-transparent manner. This is also known as the “Mosaic Effect”. “Mosaic Effect”, small fact, is a term invented by the intelligence community in the US. No longer do we have transparent government, instead we have transparent citizens. For more information on this etymological footnote, read Victor V. Ramraj’s brilliant book Global Anti-Terrorism Law and Policy.
  • Public data, Open Data, has been paid for by taxpayers. The data is a public asset and should not be given away to private sector companies that have no transparency requirements. See Ade Adewunmi’s brilliant piece written on the UK’s Government Digital Service Blog for more on this. Also a blog post I wrote based on my work at the White House Open Data Roundtables in regards to data as an asset on the OpenDataSoft blog.

The Data Exchange Model Already Includes You.

Many years ago I worked as a Vice President for a data exchange company. This company, RateWatch, packaged and resold bank rate data to banks. The banks found it cheaper to buy rates from the largest database of bank rates in the world rather than try to gather the intelligence themselves.

Selling Access is not what Smells About this Deal

APIs usually have tokens and these tokens can be throttled. This is to prevent abuse of the API and the underlying data. Governments that sell a premium access to these API are a different animal to what Hitachi is doing. Consuming millions of rows of data is not something the average person does. Selling access to the API, with a Service Level Agreement (SLA), allows public sector to make the data more reusable.

Local government can do this with other assets: toll roads; industrial use of natural resources; access to medical care; an expectation of public safety. All of these municipal services have a basic free level and a level at which there are additional fees. Consider transportation, if you drive a car you pay taxes and gasoline to drive. Taking a bus is less expensive and there are no taxes. In the same way data can be distributed more or less equally. The real difference is in the velocity of data consumption.

Examples of Companies that Collect and Repackage data:

  • Axiom sells data subscriptions to, among other customers, users of SalesForce.
  • XOR Data Exchange offers customer acquisition risk mitigation through subscriptions to credit profiles of consumers. Your cable company probably uses XOR.
  • BDEX offers persona data including spending habits, entertainment habits and political affiliation.
  • LexisNexis sells data analytics supporting compliance, customer acquisition, fraud detection, health outcomes, identity solutions, investigation, receivables management, risk decisioning and workflow optimization.
  • ESRI repackages public (open) data from US Agencies and offers subscriptions to its ArcGIS online service. The data is now in a non-reusable, proprietary format.
  • Hitachi Insight Group and the City of Copenhagen will collect and resell public data to private interests.

It’s a long and somewhat unsettling list

These companies spend money to gather information about all of us based on our commercial and entertainment habits. They then sell this data to marketing companies looking to remarket to all of us. The deal is we exchange our data in return for small benefits at the gas pump, the grocery store, the movie theatre and probably every place you shop. That is ok. We can opt out. We know it’s happening and we play along.

How the Hitachi Deal Works

The idea of data exchanges has been around probably as long as humans have been writing things down. Now that most of us operate in digital environments on a daily basis, it is not surprising that companies have figured out that data is money.

Hitachi Insight Group approach the City of Copenhagen. The City pledged $1.3 million and Hitachi matched these funds at 2:1. Note again that Hitachi is using money from the [local] government. This money is used to incentivize the private sector to invest money in making the data suitable and reliable for data sharing. In this scheme, the City recovers some of its upfront costs in making the data suitable for release. Hitachi plans to license its technology to other cities with a one time startup fee after which there will be no further obligations on the part of the government.

This implies that all of the revenue then goes back to the Hitachi Group. Hitachi does not know if this is a viable model and neither does the City of Copenhagen. At best, the City achieved a goal of limited value, it recovered some capital. At worst, the city short-circuited its own Smarter City initiative.

When we talked about access to APIs and cities wanting to charge for premium access, we decided that was ok. The City has an obligation to taxpayers to recover any revenue possible. Residents can access the API without a token for research or data storytelling, business can pay a small fee to increase the velocity of the data harvested from the Open Data Portal.

What makes the Hitachi deal so bad for Copenhagen is that it does not solve the data dissemination issue. Hitachi will control the data market and all access to the data.

 Open Knowledge Danmark har også tidligere har et gæsteindlæg om samme emne med titlen: Impressions of City Data Exchange Copenhagen.

Energinet.dk will use CKAN to launch Energy DataStore – a free and open portal for sharing energy data

- January 24, 2017 in åben data, ckan, energi data, english, klima, offentlige data

Dette er en repost af et indlæg fra Open Knowledge Internationals blog.   Open data service provider Viderum is working with Energinet.dk, the gas and electricity transmission system operator in Denmark, to provide near real-time access to Danish energy data. Using CKAN, an open-source platform for sharing data originally developed by Open Knowledge International, Energinet.dk’s Energy DataStore will provide easy and open access to large quantities of energy data to support the green transition and enable innovation.
Image credit: Jürgen Sandesneben, Flickr CC BY

Image credit: Jürgen Sandesneben, Flickr CC BY

What is the Energy DataStore?

Energinet.dk holds the energy consumption data from Danish house-holds and businesses as well as production data from windmills, solar cells and power plants. All this data will be made available in aggregated form through the Energy DataStore, including electricity market data and near-real-time information on CO2 emissions. The Energy DataStore will be built using open-source platform CKAN, the world’s leading data management system for open data. Through the platform, users will be able to find and extract data manually or through an API. “The Energy DataStore opens the next frontier for CKAN by expanding into large-scale, continuously growing datasets published by public sector enterprises”, writes Sebastian Moleski, Managing Director of Viderum, “We’re delighted Energinet.dk has chosen Viderum as the CKAN experts to help build this revolutionary platform. With our contribution to the success of the Energy DataStore, Viderum is taking the next step in fulfilling our mission: to make the world’s public data discoverable and accessible to everyone.” Open Knowledge International’s commercial spin-off, Viderum, is using CKAN to build a responsive platform for Energinet.dk that publishes energy consumption data for every municipality in hourly increments with a look to provide real-time in future. The Energy DataStore will provide consumers, businesses and non-profit organizations access to information vital for consumer savings, business innovation and green technology. As Pavel Richter, CEO of Open Knowledge International explains, “CKAN has been instrumental over the past 10 years in providing access to a wide range of government data. By using CKAN, the Energy DataStore signals a growing awareness of the value of open data and open source to society, not just for business growth and innovation, but for citizens and civil society organizations looking to use this data to address environmental issues.” Energinet.dk hopes that by providing easily accessible energy data, citizens will feel empowered by the transparency and businesses can create new products and services, leading to more knowledge sharing around innovative business models.     Notes:
Energinet.dk
Energinet.dk owns the Danish electricity and gas transmission system – the ‘energy’ motorways. The company’s main task is to maintain the overall security of electricity and gas supply and create objective and transparent conditions for competition on the energy markets.
CKAN
CKAN is the world’s leading open-source data portal platform. It is a complete out-of-the-box software solution that makes data accessible – by providing tools to streamline publishing, sharing, finding and using data. CKAN is aimed at data publishers (national and regional governments, companies and organizations) wanting to make their data open and available. A slide-deck overview of CKAN can be found here.
Viderum
Viderum is an open data solutions provider spun off from Open Knowledge, an internationally recognized non-profit working to open knowledge and see it used to empower and improve the lives of citizens around the world.
Open Knowledge International
Open Knowledge International is a global non-profit organisation focused on realising open data’s value to society by helping civil society groups access and use data to take action on social problems. Open Knowledge International does this in three ways: 1) we show the value of open data for the work of civil society organizations; 2) we provide organisations with the tools and skills to effectively use open data; and 3) we make government information systems responsive to civil society.

Energinet.dk will use CKAN to launch Energy DataStore – a free and open portal for sharing energy data

- January 24, 2017 in åben data, ckan, energi data, english, klima, offentlige data

Dette er en repost af et indlæg fra Open Knowledge Internationals blog.   Open data service provider Viderum is working with Energinet.dk, the gas and electricity transmission system operator in Denmark, to provide near real-time access to Danish energy data. Using CKAN, an open-source platform for sharing data originally developed by Open Knowledge International, Energinet.dk’s Energy DataStore will provide easy and open access to large quantities of energy data to support the green transition and enable innovation.
Image credit: Jürgen Sandesneben, Flickr CC BY

Image credit: Jürgen Sandesneben, Flickr CC BY

What is the Energy DataStore?

Energinet.dk holds the energy consumption data from Danish house-holds and businesses as well as production data from windmills, solar cells and power plants. All this data will be made available in aggregated form through the Energy DataStore, including electricity market data and near-real-time information on CO2 emissions. The Energy DataStore will be built using open-source platform CKAN, the world’s leading data management system for open data. Through the platform, users will be able to find and extract data manually or through an API. “The Energy DataStore opens the next frontier for CKAN by expanding into large-scale, continuously growing datasets published by public sector enterprises”, writes Sebastian Moleski, Managing Director of Viderum, “We’re delighted Energinet.dk has chosen Viderum as the CKAN experts to help build this revolutionary platform. With our contribution to the success of the Energy DataStore, Viderum is taking the next step in fulfilling our mission: to make the world’s public data discoverable and accessible to everyone.” Open Knowledge International’s commercial spin-off, Viderum, is using CKAN to build a responsive platform for Energinet.dk that publishes energy consumption data for every municipality in hourly increments with a look to provide real-time in future. The Energy DataStore will provide consumers, businesses and non-profit organizations access to information vital for consumer savings, business innovation and green technology. As Pavel Richter, CEO of Open Knowledge International explains, “CKAN has been instrumental over the past 10 years in providing access to a wide range of government data. By using CKAN, the Energy DataStore signals a growing awareness of the value of open data and open source to society, not just for business growth and innovation, but for citizens and civil society organizations looking to use this data to address environmental issues.” Energinet.dk hopes that by providing easily accessible energy data, citizens will feel empowered by the transparency and businesses can create new products and services, leading to more knowledge sharing around innovative business models.     Notes:
Energinet.dk
Energinet.dk owns the Danish electricity and gas transmission system – the ‘energy’ motorways. The company’s main task is to maintain the overall security of electricity and gas supply and create objective and transparent conditions for competition on the energy markets.
CKAN
CKAN is the world’s leading open-source data portal platform. It is a complete out-of-the-box software solution that makes data accessible – by providing tools to streamline publishing, sharing, finding and using data. CKAN is aimed at data publishers (national and regional governments, companies and organizations) wanting to make their data open and available. A slide-deck overview of CKAN can be found here.
Viderum
Viderum is an open data solutions provider spun off from Open Knowledge, an internationally recognized non-profit working to open knowledge and see it used to empower and improve the lives of citizens around the world.
Open Knowledge International
Open Knowledge International is a global non-profit organisation focused on realising open data’s value to society by helping civil society groups access and use data to take action on social problems. Open Knowledge International does this in three ways: 1) we show the value of open data for the work of civil society organizations; 2) we provide organisations with the tools and skills to effectively use open data; and 3) we make government information systems responsive to civil society.

In Copenhagen: Open Knowledge Founder on An Open Information Age

- November 16, 2016 in begivenhed, english, event, generelt, internationalt, organisation

Open Knowledge founder Rufus Pollock is in Copenhagen and will give an inspiring talk titled an Open Information Age. Open for all. No admission fee. The talk will be in English. Facebook-event here. Place: DSSL (Digital Social Science Lab) at Det Samfundsvidenskabelige Fakultetsbibliotek (Gothersgade 140). Time and date: Wednesday 23th November, 17.00-19.00.   An Open Information Age How can we can build an open information age? And why should we do it? Find out with Dr Rufus Pollock, a leading global expert on digital policy, openness and innovation.
  • Future of work: will robots take all the jobs – and should we care?
  • Freedom: how to preserve freedom in a world of Googles and Facebooks who have the power to shape how we think and act?
  • Inequality: concerned about growing inequality and the digital divide?
  • Innovation: how can we harness the full power of digital tech for innovation and creativity?
  • Want to build an economy and society fit for the information age?

Open information is the biggest policy opportunity of the 21st century with answers for all of these questions. Openness is central not only to creating a more innovative and transparent society but to creating one which is fair, free, healthy and wealthy
Photo by Open Knowledge CC-SAAbout Dr Rufus Pollock
Dr Rufus Pollock is an adviser on digital policy and openness to governments and organizations around the world. He has worked extensively as a researcher, entrepreneur and technologist on how we can build the best possible digital age — inclusive, innovative and open. He is the President and Founder of Open Knowledge, an international non-profit organization using advocacy and technology to empower people with access to information and the capacity to use it. A pioneer in the rapidly developing area of digital policy, he has made Open Knowledge into one of the leading “think/do tanks” of the twenty-first century. In addition to Open Knowledge, he has been involved in many other organizations such as Creative Commons, FFII and the Open Rights Group. He was previously the Mead Fellow in Economics at the University of Cambridge, where he remains an Associate of the Centre for Information and Intellectual Property Law. In 2010 he was appointed to a $1m three-year Shuttleworth Foundation Fellowship, and in 2012 he was elected an Ashoka Fellow.

In Copenhagen: Open Knowledge Founder on An Open Information Age

- November 16, 2016 in begivenhed, english, event, generelt, internationalt, organisation

Open Knowledge founder Rufus Pollock is in Copenhagen and will give an inspiring talk titled an Open Information Age. Open for all. No admission fee. The talk will be in English. Facebook-event here (if you don’t use Facebook, you can register for the event by sending us a tweet, an email or just comment below). Place: DSSL (Digital Social Science Lab) at Det Samfundsvidenskabelige Fakultetsbibliotek (Gothersgade 140). Time and date: Wednesday 23th November, 17.00-19.00.   An Open Information Age How can we can build an open information age? And why should we do it? Find out with Dr Rufus Pollock, a leading global expert on digital policy, openness and innovation.
  • Future of work: will robots take all the jobs – and should we care?
  • Freedom: how to preserve freedom in a world of Googles and Facebooks who have the power to shape how we think and act?
  • Inequality: concerned about growing inequality and the digital divide?
  • Innovation: how can we harness the full power of digital tech for innovation and creativity?
  • Want to build an economy and society fit for the information age?

Open information is the biggest policy opportunity of the 21st century with answers for all of these questions. Openness is central not only to creating a more innovative and transparent society but to creating one which is fair, free, healthy and wealthy
Photo by Open Knowledge CC-SAAbout Dr Rufus Pollock
Dr Rufus Pollock is an adviser on digital policy and openness to governments and organizations around the world. He has worked extensively as a researcher, entrepreneur and technologist on how we can build the best possible digital age — inclusive, innovative and open. He is the President and Founder of Open Knowledge, an international non-profit organization using advocacy and technology to empower people with access to information and the capacity to use it. A pioneer in the rapidly developing area of digital policy, he has made Open Knowledge into one of the leading “think/do tanks” of the twenty-first century. In addition to Open Knowledge, he has been involved in many other organizations such as Creative Commons, FFII and the Open Rights Group. He was previously the Mead Fellow in Economics at the University of Cambridge, where he remains an Associate of the Centre for Information and Intellectual Property Law. In 2010 he was appointed to a $1m three-year Shuttleworth Foundation Fellowship, and in 2012 he was elected an Ashoka Fellow.   If you want to help with planning or anything else related to the event, just ping us at our mailinglist.

International open data day report from Yaounde Cameroon

- April 8, 2016 in åben data, dataportal, english, Government, København, offentlige data, open gov

The Open Data Day 2016  was successfully hosted and celebrated in Cameroon by the netsquared Yaoundé community.  The theme of the day was ‘Empowering Cameroonians to accelerate open data’, bringing together 90 participants. The event was hosted in Paraclete Institute in Yaoundé, which brought together multiple stakeholders and students, to empower them in advancing open data in this part of the world. The event started at 3pm with a theoretical session and ended with a practical workshop at 7pm. 12783518_1018005344927962_8147199272335209675_oThe theoretical session was hosted to shared with participants the basic concept of open data, its importance, and how it could be accelerated. This was demonstrated through a powerpoint presentation from panel members who shared examples of the impact of open data on government intermediaries, education and agriculture in strengthening citizen engagement. And the importance of the release of data sets. This event help to encourage participants to use open data for local content development in Cameroon,  showing how data could be made available for everyone to use, especially government data. The key concept was resourcing technologies that could be used for smart visualization of data and how data could be made available on a database for everyone to use to encourage innovative collaboration. We also discovered that most data has not been made accessible in Cameroon.f In order to encourage innovation, transparency, and collaboration we need to advance the open data movement in Cameroon, The practical workshop empowered participants to blog about data andto share it for reuseIt can be distributed on a platform like internet database website using blogg.com and other blogging sites like simplesite.com. We also made them to understand that research data must be made available for people to reuse and distributed for everyone to visualize it. We also empower them on how they can  made their data  available  socially, teaching participants that they can share data from blogs to other communication platforms or social media platforms  like Facebook, Twitter and Google   The event was appreciated by every participant.

#OKFestMTL – Call of contributions

- January 27, 2016 in english, Open Data

#OKFestMTL – Showcase of the accessible, free and participative Web networks A call to associative organizations and groups that contribute to the development of an accessible, free and participative Web. Ce message est également disponible en : Français Date: April 12, 2016 Place: Palais des congrès de Montréal Program of the day Hébergée par le […]