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Opendata.ch/2019 Forum – Early-Bird-Tickets bis 30. April

- April 1, 2019 in event, National

Seit der Ankündigung unseres neuen Konferenz-Formats am 7. März haben sich über fünfzig Interessierte mit positivem Feedback bei uns gemeldet. Für sie und alle weiteren stehen jetzt bis Ende April vergünstigte Early-Bird-Tickets bereit: zur Anmeldung.

Das können sie weiter tun

  • Sie möchten sich als freiwillige Helfer*in melden? Kontaktieren Sie uns via info@opendata.ch, wir freuen uns über Ihre Unterstützung.
  • Erzählen Sie in Ihren Netzwerken von der Veranstaltung – verbreiten Sie die URL dieses Blogbeitrags.
  • Unterstützen Sie die Veranstaltung finanziell: Wir müssen etwa 20’000 CHF an Sponsoring sammeln. Sie können sich bei info@opendata.ch melden, die Sponsoringmöglichkeiten stehen bereit.
  • Bleiben Sie über Neuigkeiten informiert via Twitter @OpendataCH oder unseren Newsletter, den Sie hier per E-Mail abonnieren können.
Bis in drei Monaten in Bern-Wankdorf, wir freuen uns!
Nikki Böhler, Andreas Amsler und das Team der Opendata.ch/2019

Shaping the Future of Education through Open Innovation

- March 29, 2019 in event

Last weekend, 30 students, 15 teachers and 30 professionals (education experts, designers, entrepreneurs and programmers) came together to test new digital initiatives at the Lyceum Alpinum Zuoz. We were highly impressed by the highly engaged participants, visionary initiatives and astonishing results of the first Open Education Hackdays prototype!

11 Highly Relevant Projects

Within only 24 hours we managed to collaboratively develop 11 new projects that help the school community to benefit from new technologies and digitisation:
  • Global School: Connect the school more strongly with the professional world.
  • Tournament for Digital Balance: Enable students & schools to visualise & reflect their internet time both individually and collectively
  • Data Literacy: Explore your internet habits with open data in a safe and accessible way.
  • Personal Learning Data Logbook: Enable students to record and use their learning data in a secure way.
  • Individual Speed of Learning: Use analytics to evaluate students and enable them to learn in their own speed.
  • Learning Nomads: Create a concept that allows students to learn outside from school and/or connect more strongly with the outside world.
  • Flip Teaching Action: Enable teachers to create digital classes in order to create more room for discussions and questions in the classroom.
  • OER Repository: Developing a first prototype of an Open Educational Resources (OER) Repository
  • Sport, Sleep, Achieve: Helping students to understand the effect of sport & sleep on their mental state.
  • Self-Developed 3D Learning Simulations: Enable teachers & students to create their own virtual reality chemistry classes.
  • Student Feedback: Enable students to give appropriate feedback to teachers.

Help us Incubating these Initiatives

We’ll try our best to make most of these initiated projects come to life, at the Lyceum Alpinum Zuoz and / or other schools. If you’re interested in support us in this endeavor (as a school, expert or sponsor), please reach out to us via info@opendata.ch.

Excited & Engaged Participants

During the Hackdays we collected quotes from all types of participants to improve our understanding of their experience and takeaways:
  • Pupil at the Lyceum Alpinum Zuoz (LAZ): “At the Hackdays I am learning how to cooperate with all of my teammates. In our group we have 3 elderly men, who are way much more mature. We learned how to communicate effectively and express our ideas. Even if they are older, we are cooperating and respecting each other. I never experienced this before.”
  • Teacher at the LAZ: “We should do this more often. Sit together, externals, students, staff and talk about the future. Even though we do this all the time. But it’s a different setting. I appreciate the different ideas from the students in my group. They have visions. It’s something else than seeing them in my classroom.”
  • Researcher working at Labster (an EdTech Startup): “I’m a researcher. I want to know how users interact with technology. We brought a piece of technology here and tested it on users [students and teachers] to see how it works. I realised, this tool that we developed is much more difficult than I anticipated. If you use a tool internally you don’t realise how others are perceiving. At the same time, I was very surprised how well especially the students were able to use the tool and benefit from it in new ways.”
  • Programmer from ETH: “I’m bored by traditional learning environments and much more fascinated by the possibility of learning in digital classrooms. At these Hackdays, I met a lot of inspirational people: Designers, Coders, Entrepreneurs and students! Everyone is very open here. Everybody feels equal. Plus, I can practice my back end skill.”

Our Next Events

Next week, we’ll present the learnings and results of the Hackdays in front of relevant stakeholders at the following two events:
  • 5th of April: Workshop @ SLK-Brunnensymposium (training event for Zurich’s school principals

  • 6th of April: Workshop @ Open Education Day in Bern

Visual Impressions

If you missed the first Open Education Hackdays or want to reminisce about the 2 exciting day, take advantage of a few snapshots taken by various parties:

Powered By

The first Open Education Hackdays was a collaboration between Kickstart Innovation, Lyceum Alpinum Zuoz, Gerbert Rüf Stiftung and Opendata.ch.

Shaping the Future of Education through Open Innovation

- March 29, 2019 in event

Last weekend, 30 students, 15 teachers and 30 professionals (education experts, designers, entrepreneurs and programmers) came together to test new digital initiatives at the Lyceum Alpinum Zuoz. We were highly impressed by the highly engaged participants, visionary initiatives and astonishing results of the first Open Education Hackdays prototype!

11 Highly Relevant Projects

Within only 24 hours we managed to collaboratively develop 11 new projects that help the school community to benefit from new technologies and digitisation:
  • Global School: Connect the school more strongly with the professional world.
  • Tournament for Digital Balance: Enable students & schools to visualise & reflect their internet time both individually and collectively
  • Data Literacy: Explore your internet habits with open data in a safe and accessible way.
  • Personal Learning Data Logbook: Enable students to record and use their learning data in a secure way.
  • Individual Speed of Learning: Use analytics to evaluate students and enable them to learn in their own speed.
  • Learning Nomads: Create a concept that allows students to learn outside from school and/or connect more strongly with the outside world.
  • Flip Teaching Action: Enable teachers to create digital classes in order to create more room for discussions and questions in the classroom.
  • OER Repository: Developing a first prototype of an Open Educational Resources (OER) Repository
  • Sport, Sleep, Achieve: Helping students to understand the effect of sport & sleep on their mental state.
  • Self-Developed 3D Learning Simulations: Enable teachers & students to create their own virtual reality chemistry classes.
  • Student Feedback: Enable students to give appropriate feedback to teachers.

Help us Incubating these Initiatives

We’ll try our best to make most of these initiated projects come to life, at the Lyceum Alpinum Zuoz and / or other schools. If you’re interested in support us in this endeavor (as a school, expert or sponsor), please reach out to us via info@opendata.ch.

Excited & Engaged Participants

During the Hackdays we collected quotes from all types of participants to improve our understanding of their experience and takeaways:
  • Pupil at the Lyceum Alpinum Zuoz (LAZ): “At the Hackdays I am learning how to cooperate with all of my teammates. In our group we have 3 elderly men, who are way much more mature. We learned how to communicate effectively and express our ideas. Even if they are older, we are cooperating and respecting each other. I never experienced this before.”
  • Teacher at the LAZ: “We should do this more often. Sit together, externals, students, staff and talk about the future. Even though we do this all the time. But it’s a different setting. I appreciate the different ideas from the students in my group. They have visions. It’s something else than seeing them in my classroom.”
  • Researcher working at Labster (an EdTech Startup): “I’m a researcher. I want to know how users interact with technology. We brought a piece of technology here and tested it on users [students and teachers] to see how it works. I realised, this tool that we developed is much more difficult than I anticipated. If you use a tool internally you don’t realise how others are perceiving. At the same time, I was very surprised how well especially the students were able to use the tool and benefit from it in new ways.”
  • Programmer from ETH: “I’m bored by traditional learning environments and much more fascinated by the possibility of learning in digital classrooms. At these Hackdays, I met a lot of inspirational people: Designers, Coders, Entrepreneurs and students! Everyone is very open here. Everybody feels equal. Plus, I can practice my back end skill.”

Our Next Events

Next week, we’ll present the learnings and results of the Hackdays in front of relevant stakeholders at the following two events:
  • 5th of April: Workshop @ SLK-Brunnensymposium (training event for Zurich’s school principals

  • 6th of April: Workshop @ Open Education Day in Bern

Visual Impressions

If you missed the first Open Education Hackdays or want to reminisce about the 2 exciting day, take advantage of a few snapshots taken by various parties:

Powered By

The first Open Education Hackdays was a collaboration between Kickstart Innovation, Lyceum Alpinum Zuoz, Gerbert Rüf Stiftung and Opendata.ch.

Opendata.ch/2019 Konferenz wird zum “Forum”

- March 7, 2019 in event, National

Am 4. Juli 2019 trifft sich die Open Data Community der Schweiz zum neunten Mal zu ihrem jährlichen Austausch. Dieses Jahr sind wir zu Gast bei der SBB in Bern-Wankdorf. Und wir wagen zusammen etwas Neues.

Mit der “1-2-4-all”-Methode klären Gruppen auf inklusive und effektive Weise Herausforderungen und enwickeln Massnahmen (Quelle linkes Bild: liberatingstructures.com).

Wir sind mehr als ein wenig aufgeregt, diesen Blogbeitrag zu schreiben. Warum? Seit bald zehn Jahren vernetzen wir Open Data Interessierte und Engagierte in der Schweiz und darüber hinaus. Mit einer Vielzahl von zentralen und dezentralen Anlässen: Meetups, Hackdays und unserer jährlichen Konferenz. Dieses Jahr lancieren wir ein neues Format, um das Konferenzprogramm partizipativ mit den Teilnehmer*innen zu entwickeln und mehr Raum für konkreten Austausch untereinander zu schaffen. Das Konferenzformat “Unconference”, das wir “Forum” nennen wollen, unterscheidet sich grundlegend von herkömmlichen Konferenzen: Statt Einwegkommunikation und Vorträge von der Bühne zum Plenum zu verfolgen, können die Teilnehmerinnen ihre eigenen Fragen und Herausforderungen, Erfahrungen und Kompetenzen einbringen und sich mit den Anwesenden über die Themen austauschen, die ihnen am meisten unter den Nägel brennen. Sie nehmen neue Ideen und Einsichten mit. Sie knüpfen und vertiefen Kontakte zu Gleichgesinnten und Expertinnen.

Erfahrungen zu praktischen Massnahmen austauschen

Wir wollen den Teilnehmerinnen, wo immer sie sich befinden und welchen Hintergrund sie haben, helfen, praktische Massnahmen für die Bereitstellung und Wiederverwendung offener Daten zu ergreifen. Das Opendata.ch/2019 Forum ist eine Reihe von Besprechungen, die von den Teilnehmerinnen am Tag definiert werden (obwohl wir im Voraus Anstoss zu Themen und Fragen geben und Ideen sammeln werden). Ziel ist es, Erfahrungen und bewährte Verfahren, Inspiration und Innovation untereinander auszutauschen. Konkret soll der 4. Juli etwa wie folgt ablaufen:
08:45 - 09:15 Uhr   Generalversammlung (für Vereinsmitglieder)
08:30 - 09:30 Uhr   Kaffee & Croissants (für alle)
09:30 - 09:45 Uhr   Intro-Keynote (alle)
09:50 - 10:15 Uhr   Unconference-Programm gemeinsam definieren (alle)        
    15 min.         Pause zur Gruppenwahl
10:30 - 11:15 Uhr   Parallele Unconference-Sessions (4-5 Gruppen)        
    15 min.         Pause zum Gruppenwechsel
11:30 - 12:15 Uhr   Parallele Unconference-Sessions (4-5 Gruppen)
12:15 - 13:15 Uhr   Mittagessen (alle)
13:15 - 13:30 Uhr   Unconference-Programm Update (alle)
    15 min.         Pause zur Gruppenwahl
13:45 - 14:30 Uhr   Parallele Unconference-Sessions (4-5 Gruppen)
    15 min.         Pause zum Gruppenwechsel
14:45 - 15:30 Uhr   Parallele Unconference-Sessions (4-5 Gruppen)
    15 min.         Pause zum Wechsel ins Plenum
15:45 - 16:00 Uhr   Outro-Keynote (alle)
16:00 -             Apéro (alle)
Es wird gross werden – wir rechnen mit bis zu 250 Teilnehmer*innen. Es wird in den behandelten Themen sehr unterschiedlich sein. Hunderte von Gesprächen. Hunderte von neuen Verbindungen und Beziehungen. Es ist eine grossartige Gelegenheit, von anderen zu lernen, miteinander zu teilen, was Sie getan und dabei gelernt haben. Wir hoffen, wir treffen damit Ihre Bedürfnisse, und sind gespannt auf den Tag. Wir sehen uns in Bern!

Interessiert?

  • Sie möchten teilnehmen, dann reservieren Sie sich den 4. Juli 2019. Erklären Sie Ihr Interesse jetzt unverbindlich hier: https://goo.gl/forms/zitfNDiA2dk3dQqu1 – wir informieren Sie, sobald die Ticketbestellung offen ist.
  • Sie möchten sich als freiwillige Helfer*in melden? Kontaktieren Sie uns via info@opendata.ch, wir freuen uns über Ihre Unterstützung.
  • Erzählen Sie in Ihren Netzwerken von der Veranstaltung – verbreiten Sie die URL dieses Blogbeitrags.
  • Unterstützen Sie die Veranstaltung finanziell: Wir müssen etwa 20’000 CHF an Sponsoring sammeln. Sie können sich bei info@opendata.ch melden, wir werden in Kürze über die Sponsoringmöglichkeiten informieren.
  • Bleiben Sie über Neuigkeiten informiert via Twitter @OpendataCH oder unseren Newsletter, den Sie hier per E-Mail abonnieren können.
Wir freuen uns sehr, von Ihnen zu hören!
Nikki Böhler, Andreas Amsler und das Team der Opendata.ch/2019   Inspiriert von: One Team Gov - Logo         Ein paar Eindrücke aus erster Hand: https://twitter.com/OneTeamGov/status/976853250627592194 https://twitter.com/OneTeamGov/status/1018823898941575168 https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=Q1fdB28Btvs

Nepal’s First Women In Data Conference

- March 5, 2019 in event, nepal, OK Nepal

This blog was jointly written by Dikpal Khatri Chhetry and Dipti Gautam of Open Knowledge Nepal and has been reposted from the Open Knowledge Nepal blog On 24th February 2019 Nepal’s first Women in Data Conference was organized with the theme डाटा शक्ति नारी शक्ति – ‘where two superpowers meet’. It brought together inspiring female speakers, influential panelists, data professionals, and aspiring young women in a one-day event to celebrate women working in data. We (Open Knowledge Nepal) were one of the partners of the event. The program started with the registration and data mart happening in the calm ambience of Hotel Himalaya. We were amazed by the organizing team lineup as the participants comprised of more than 250 females. From registration to photography, everyone was female. It was all well organized and the conference hall quickly filled as the clock turned nine. The emcee, Nikki Sharma, Program Officer (Consultant), Data for Development in Nepal Program formally started the program. Ms. Sharma highlighted the importance of data and the meaningful involvement of women in it. Ms. Meghan Nalbo, Country Representative, The Asia Foundation gave a keynote speech on “Why Data is the Future and Women should be part of it”. She highlighted the endless possibilities of women coming to the field of pre-dominantly men. She cited how the same data as viewed by a male, can be differently viewed by a female, opening up different avenues. The need to start the conversation about women in data is of paramount importance and this conference has certainly helped in doing so. After the keynote session, one of the partners of the program, Gauthali Entertainment, presented the video “Move Over: Women Leaders in Data”. The video was produced by all female crew members. It showcased the stories of some of the women leaders in data from Nepal. Then the panel discussion on “How women are breaking through the glass ceiling by breaking down the numbers” was held. The panelists were Dr. Pranita Upadhyay (Programme Leader, MSc IT and Research Coordinator, The British College), Ms. Jyoti U. Devkota, PhD (Professor of Statistics, School of Science, Kathmandu University), Dr. Sambriddhi Kharel (Sociologist), Dr. Prativa Pandey (Founder and CEO, Catalyst Technology Pvt. Ltd.) and Ms Avasna Pandey (Editorial Page Editor, The Kathmandu Post), which was moderated by Ms Shuvechha Ghimire (Research Manager, Interdisciplinary Analysts). They shared their journey of being a professional in their respective fields and cited the conscious and unconscious stereotypical behaviors existing in the workplace. They also emphasized when a person put forward their ideas, they should be taken as an idea presented by a professional rather than a woman giving a suggestion. The structural biases have to be confronted and dealt with it creatively. One of the added elements of the event was that the speakers were given yellow roses, since it signifies a message of appreciation. A sense of excitement was already in the air, as the session moved forward, the conference hall was filled with the faces of enthusiasts among which almost 95% were female. This female turnout in the event is something that has rarely happened in Nepal. Shortly, the panel discussion on “Counting women in by making them visible in statistics in Nepal” followed. It was moderated by Ms. Srijana Nepal (Program Officer, The Asia Foundation). The panelists were Ms. Rosy Shakya (Statistics Expert), Ms. Bhumika Shrestha (Transgender Activist), Dr. Meena Acharya (Gender Expert and Economist) and Mr. Bivek Joshi (Monitoring, Evaluation, and Strategic Partnership Officer, UN Women Nepal). They highlighted the need to institutionalize deeper interaction between the users and producers of gender data. There are lots of gaps in the production, use and enabling policy environment for gender data, thus the need to develop its fundamentals from grassroots levels were being emphasized. Then the interactive presentation on ‘Factfulness and Gender Statistics’ was presented by Ms. Fernanda Drumond, Head of  Operations, Gapminder Foundation. It opened up the concept of how data can be used and interpreted to separate the ground reality and assumptions. Then, the panel discussion on “When technology, women and data meet” was carried out. The panelists were Ms. Sushma Giri (WLiT), Ms. Binita Shrestha (Women in STEM), Ms. Samita Kapali (Green Growth Group Pvt. Ltd.) and Ms. Sweta Karna (Deerwalk). It was moderated by Ms. Sumana Shrestha. The discussion focused on how social changes have been created through technology. The field of STEM is much more than coding. Policymaking and taking decisions can be better informed through the use of data. Finally, the announcement of the Open Data Fellowship – Women Edition, by Open Knowledge Nepal (OKN) was made. The representatives from OKN, Mr. Nikesh Balami (CEO) and Ms. Dipti Gautam (Fellowship Lead), described the phases of fellowship and its importance. You can find the details of the fellowship from here: http://fellowship.oknp.org After the lunch break, the data sessions followed, it included a brief introduction on the different types of workshops that will follow this conference. There were eight such sessions in total, where two sessions took place simultaneously. These included:
  • A Soft Skills/Professional Development Session by Ms. Sweta Karna Director of Data Operations, Deerwalk.
  • Lightning Talks by Women from the Open Data Community in Nepal.
  • Comfortable with Numbers – Statistics by Ms. Rosy Shakya, Statistics Expert.
  • How to Prepare Your Paper Using Social Research Methodology by Ms. Shuvechha Ghimire, Interdisciplinary Analysts.
  • Data Analysis with SPSS (using PSPP) by Ms. Alina Chhantel, The Open Institute.
  • The Basics on How to Use Data Analysis with Excel by Ms. Sunita Shakya, Data for Development in Nepal Program.
  • Mapping Gender Statistics Using Open Street Maps by Ms. Sweta Khanal, NAXA.
  • Visualizing Gender Data & Statistics by Ms. Anusha Thapa, Ms. Sajani Lama, and Ms. Aarya Bhandari, Bikas Udhyami.
The conference will be followed up by two different phases of training. This type of training will help in preparing the right human resource for working in data. Key Learnings and Highlights Key Learnings:
  • Data is not always about numbers. It is about the area or subject of interest that it represents.
  • Something as simple as keeping a record can make people feel visible, especially in the world where women are shadowed in almost every aspect.
  • What we think is mostly clouded by our perception on a topic, but the reality can be surprising at times.
  • The percentage of overall data sometimes clouds our judgment, but when we look at the unit values of them, it can be seen to be influenced by certain outliers. Paying close attention to data is necessary.
  • Data can be very useful for the common good. Just a simple mark in the map about the availability of public toilets in the area can save us hours of tension. Same goes for petrol stations, clinics, and so on.
Highlights:
  • A multidimensional approach to data, inclusive of information of any kind and not restricted to numbers.
  • Interactive panel discussions with experts from various sectors discussing their life experiences, data and importance of gender statistics and so on.
  • An understanding of the problems and hindrances women working with data face in a workspace.
  • A reminder that though news portrays a very discouraging scenario of women, statistics in most cases are in favor of them making progress.
  • An insight into the fact that oftentimes, data isn’t accessible at all or if accessible, not available freshly.
  • An insight into the contribution women has been making in the data sector be it through research companies and institutions or budding startups.
  • A brief outlook on different data related applications like OpenStreetMap and SPSS that were also featured in a detailed training session that followed the conference.
  • Lectures from professionals on research essentials, writing CVs, and various related skills.
  • Frequent tea breaks and a closing program to facilitate fruitful interactions with experts and fellow participants.
Women in Data Conference and Trainings is organized by Data for Development in Nepal Program with support from various partners.  

Gemeinsam und öffentlich gestalten wir die Energiezukunft der Schweiz

- February 21, 2019 in Daten, event

Diese Überzeugung verband die rund 100 Teilnehmer an den Energy Data Hackdays, welche am vergangenen Wochenende im Hightech Zentrum Aargau zusammenkamen. Dringende Herausforderungen, engagierte Hackers und offene Energiedaten ermöglichten innert 40 Stunden 13 zukunftsweisende neue Projekte. Martin Hertach vom Bundesamt für Energie, war begeistert von der Innovationskraft und den Resultaten der Hackdays:
“Es ist klar, dass Kollaboration und offene Daten die Grundbedingung für die Umsetzung der Energiestrategie 2050 sind. Die Energy Data Hackdays sind ein weiterer Beleg dafür. Ohne die branchenübergreifende Zusammenarbeit und die Verfügbarkeit der diversen Energiedaten, wäre all dies nicht möglich gewesen.”

13 Lösungsansätze für eine nachhaltige Energiezukunft

Wie immer war es erstaunlich und ermutigend zu sehen, wie viele Lösungen innert weniger als 2 Tagen realisiert werden können! Dank des interdisziplinären Charakters der Hackdays, entstanden nicht nur viele, sondern auch höchst diverse Lösungsansätze. Der gemeinsame Nenner aller Resultate war das Streben nach einer nachhaltigen Energiezukunft der Schweiz und die Nutzung frei verfügbarer Energiedaten, wie die folgende Liste aller Projekte aufzeigt:
  • Blackout Karte: Datenanalyse zur Erkennung der Ursachen für Blackouts in Netzwerken
  • Algorithmische Erneuerungsplanung: Evaluation des Wertes und Einschätzung der Folgen von Infrastrukturhaltung für die Energieversorgung
  • PV Diagnose: Eine App für Besitzer von kleinen Solarinstallationen zur Prüfung, ob die Geräte noch optimal funktionieren
  • Load Profile Shaping: Eine App für EVUs für die Einschätzung der zukünftigen Lastgangkurve
  • Ladestation Standortplanung: Eine Evaluation der besten Standorte für E-Mobil Ladestationen
  • Visistrom: Eine App, die Endnutzern hilft Strom zur richtigen Zeit zu nutzen, um unökologischen Energiequellen zu vermeiden
  • Gebäudepass “Cloud”: Lösungen für die Entwicklung eines Gebäudepasses
  • Jambricks: Eine Untersuchung der elektronischen Ausrüstung von Hackathon Teilnehmer
  • What is Watt: Eine Plattform, die den Energieverbrauch verschiedener Alltagsszenarien berechnet und vergleicht
  • SBB Weather: Eine Analyse des Einflusses des Wetters auf die Zugfahrten
  • Freestyle: Freestyle ist eine App, die Menschen hilft, Energie in weniger belasteten Zeiträumen zu nutzen.
  • SBB ZEV: Eine Visualisierung des Potenzials verschiedener SBB-Gebäude als selbstversorgende Einheiten
  • Videmos: Stärkung der Bürgerbeteiligung an Schadensmeldungen

Herausforderungen und neue Kontakte motivierten auch Hackathon Neulinge

Überraschend für die Organisatoren war es, dass mehr als die Hälfte der Teilnehmer noch nie zuvor an einem Hackathon waren. Anna von Eniwa war eine dieser Erstlinge und erklärte uns, was sie überzeugt hat, an den Energy Data Hackdays teilzunehmen:
“Am meisten motiviert haben mich die spannenden Challenges. Ich spürte, das wird eine tolle Möglichkeit, meine Kreativität auszuleben und mich mit anderen Branchen und Blickwinkeln auszutauschen. Und genau so ist es nun auch. Das gemeinsame Verfolgen eines sinnvollen Ziels, der interdisziplinäre Austausch und der tolle Spirit der Leute – es erfüllt absolut meine Vorstellungen.”
Auch unerwartet war die ausserordentlich hohe Anzahl der Teilnehmer, die vor Ort übernachteten. 15 Leute, die von ausserhalb der Region oder sogar der Schweiz für den Anlass anreisten, blieben über Nacht im Hightech Zentrum Brugg.

Organisation und Trägerschaft

Der Anlass wurde von der Zukunftsregion Argovia und Opendata.ch zusammen mit der AEW Energie AG, der Hightech Zentrum Aargau AG, der Eniwa AG, dem Bundesamt für Energie, der SBB, der Avectris AG sowie der Abteilung Energie des Kantons Aargau durchgeführt.
energy_data_hackdays_2019_13
energy_data_hackdays_2019_59
Kopie von 20190215_110454
Kopie von 20190215_101135
181220_Opendata_Hackdays_digital
Kopie von 20190215_100939
energy_data_hackdays_2019_48
energy_data_hackdays_2019_50
energy_data_hackdays_2019_34
  • Ein Teil der Bilder stammen vom Magazin aargau einsA

Save the Dates: Open Data Events 2019

- January 13, 2019 in event

Einige spannende Veranstaltungen zu und mit Open Data in der Schweiz: Save the Dates!
  1. Januar, Lausanne
    Applied Machine Learning Days 2019, mit einem Workshop zu Open Data, Anmeldung

  2. Januar, Zürich
    PolitTalk Digitales Zürich #6, zum Thema “Daten und Nahrungsmittel”, Anmeldung

  3. Februar, Rapperswil-Jona
    Open Data Beer Nr. 6, Host: Kanton St. Gallen & Hochschule Rapperswil, Anmeldung

15.–16. Februar, Brugg AG
Energy Data Hackdays (Anmeldung unter “Mitmachen”)

  1. März, weltweit
    Open Data Day
22.–23. März, Zuoz
Open Education Hackdays (Anmeldung unter “participate”)
  1. Mai, Sierre
    Agricathon (Recap Info 2018 Edition)

  2. Juli, tbd.
    Opendata.ch/2019 Konferenz

6.–8. September, Sion
mix’n’hack, 5th Swiss Open Cultural Data Hackathon, Host: Les Arsenaux

  1. Oktober, Bern
    DINAcon 2019 (Recap Video 2018 Edition)
Ein Event mit Open-Data-Bezug fehlt in unserer Liste? Etwas ist falsch? Bitte bei info@opendata.ch mit den entsprechenden Informationen melden, merci!

Für die offene Mehrsprachigkeit in der Schweiz

- December 3, 2018 in event, Zürich

Wir bedanken uns nochmals herzlichst beim Forum Helveticum, den diversen TeilnehmerInnen und den spannenden HerausforderInnen für den erfolgreichen Hackathon zum Thema “Mehrsprachigkeit 4.0”. Hier findet ihr einen Auszug der Zusammenfassung vom Forum Helveticum: Auf den Reflexionen der Konferenz aufbauend, begrüßte das Forum Helveitcum in Kooperation mit Opendata.ch rund 40 Personen aus den verschiedensten Branchen (Informatiker, Linguisten, Designer, Studenten, Verständigungsexperten etc.) zum „Mehrsprachigkeit 4.0“ Hackathon. Den Teilnehmenden wurden 14 verschiedene Herausforderungen im Zusammenhang mit Mehrsprachigkeit vorgestellt, auf die sie in multidisziplinären Gruppen innert 24 Stunden innovative Antworten erarbeiteten. Bei der Abschlusspräsentation am Samstag, 24. November 2018, wurden zehn erarbeitete Projekte vorgestellt: Gemeinsam mit einer Jury hat das FH zwei Projekte ausgewählt, die während eines halben Jahres weiter unterstützt werden:
  • ExCHange„: Eine Plattform zur Förderung des direkten, individuellen Sprachaustausches zwischen jungen Menschen.
  • Das Wörterbuch hinter dem Mauszeiger„: Eine Web-Erweiterung für Firefox, die die direkte Übersetzung eines Wortes zwischen Romanisch und Deutsch ermöglicht, indem man mit dem Mauszeiger über ein Wort fährt.
Unter der Leitung von jungen Menschen nutzen diese beiden Projekte neue Technologien, um die Verständigung in der Schweiz zu fördern und die Landessprachen zugänglicher zu machen. Die Projekte weisen ein grosses Potenzial auf und das Forum Helveticum wie auch Opendata.ch freuen sich, deren Realisierung unterstützen zu können.

Open Research London – what is open science?

- August 22, 2018 in event, Local Groups

The next Open Research London event will be on Wednesday 3 October 2018 at the Francis Crick Institute, starting at 6pm. Four speakers will talk about open science:
  • Patrick Vallance (Government Chief Scientific Adviser)
  • Jenny Molloy (Shuttleworth Foundation Research Fellow, University of Cambridge)
    • Open science and the future bioeconomy
  • Wen Hwa Lee (Chief Scientific Officer at Action Against AMD & Programme Director Oxford Martin School)
  • Tim Britton (Managing Director, Open Research Group at Springer Nature)
Eventbrite registration page and further details of talks will be available soon. Follow @openresldn on Twitter for more news.

Open Research London – event on 3 Oct 2018

- August 22, 2018 in event, Local Groups

The next Open Research London event will be on Wednesday 3 October 2018 at the Francis Crick Institute, starting at 6pm. Three speakers will talk about open science, in particular the relationship between open science and commercial activity:
  • Jenny Molloy (Shuttleworth Foundation Research Fellow, University of Cambridge)
    • Open science and the future bioeconomy
  • Wen Hwa Lee (Chief Scientific Officer at Action Against AMD & Programme Director Oxford Martin School)
    • Open Science – how extreme can it be?
  • Tim Britton (Managing Director, Open Research Group at Springer Nature)
    • Conflict, what conflict? Where open science meets commercial interests
Eventbrite registration page and further details of talks will be available soon. Follow @openresldn on Twitter for more news. The evening will be chaired by Veronique Birault, Director of Translation at the Francis Crick Institute. Jenny Molloy (Shuttleworth Foundation Research Fellow, University of Cambridge)
  • Open science and the future bioeconomy
    The question of how society deals with intellectual property (IP) and structures scientific institutions and communities to manage and disseminate knowledge is critically important to our future. Open science covers a broad set of practices and ways of working that aim to increase that dissemination of knowledge and which have largely focused on digital research outputs such as papers and datasets. In biotechnology, there are on-going experiments with technologies and even downstream products where open approaches to intellectual property are strategically applied to increase economic or social impact, reduce transaction costs and accelerate innovation. This talk will highlight efforts that aim to de-risk drug discovery, accelerate transitions to renewable technologies and increase equity for those in resource-poor contexts. I will describe the insights these examples might give us into the legal, economic and governance issues surrounding open technologies and their potential for building a sustainable and equitable bioeconomy, where biological knowledge is applied to innovating or improving on production of food, medicines, materials and more.
  • Dr Jenny Molloy is a Shuttleworth Foundation Research Fellow in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of Cambridge, studying the role and impact of open approaches to intellectual property for a sustainable and equitable bioeconomy. Dr. Molloy’s work focuses on better understanding problems facing researchers accessing biological research tools in low-resource contexts, particularly Latin America and Africa. She is analysing existing innovative solutions and the potential for local, distributed manufacturing of enzymes to improve access and build capacity for biological research. The broader aim of her research is to contextualise “open source” approaches to biotechnology within current narratives of innovation and the bioeconomy policy agenda. In addition to her role in the University, she is a founding Director of two non-profit organisations ContentMine (producing open source software for text mining scientific papers) and Biomakespace (a community laboratory for engineering with biology) and she co-organises the international Gathering for Open Science Hardware.
Wen Hwa Lee (Chief Scientific Officer at Action Against AMD & Programme Director Oxford Martin School)
  • Open Science – how extreme can it be?
    As Open Science gains traction, different segments of the biomedical research community have been trying to capture what it really is and how to better structure it to increase efficiency. As such, many of so called ‘open’ initiatives are simply rebranding of existing, rather closed implementations, which undermines the perception and ultimately the potential of truly Open initiatives. We will be examining the efforts of the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), which has been operating an ever-increasing open model and its impact in the way Open Science is practiced in drug discovery – delicately balancing changes instatus quo and the fleeting definition of acceptable/ implementable open science.
  • Lee is a molecular and structural biologist with a wide international network in drug discovery, including charities, academia, industry and government agencies. He’s been a practitioner and champion of Open Science since 2004 joining the first cohort of researchers hired by the SGC Oxford. Lee designed and led several SGC strategies and served as its Director for the Disease Foundations programme, until June 2018 when he joined Action Against Age-related Macular Degeneration as its inaugural Chief Scientific Officer.
Tim Britton (Managing Director, Open Research Group at Springer Nature)
  • Conflict, what conflict? Where open science meets commercial interests
    It is often assumed that there is an automatic tension between being ‘open’ and being ‘commercial’. In publishing terms this can be stated as a perceived incompatibility between open access and subscription business models. Further, there is a move, particularly in Europe, to demand full open access for all work with senior EU officials and advisors calling for full open access to publically funded research and targeting hybrid journals as a barrier to openness. This leads to breathless talk of ‘considerable tensions’ between universities, funders and publishers: a model in crisis with commercial parties and advocates for openness purportedly in conflict. Really?Tim Britton will address this question, demonstrate how the commercial and open agenda can align; how hybrid can and should be seen as an important part of the open agenda and how the true open revolution is yet to come.
  • Tim is responsible for the open research portfolio across Springer Nature which includes BioMed Central, SpringerOpen, the open access journals from Nature Research; open access monographs from Springer and Palgrave Macmillan and open data. He was previously head of strategy and transformation for PwC’s global data research and insight centre, r2i, and before that spent eight years as UK CEO and European Chief Operating Officer of YouGov.