You are browsing the archive for event.

Last days to register for the Tourism Hackdays 2021!

- April 8, 2021 in event, hackathon, Tourism

Take part and support innovation for tourism in Switzerland: help bring one of our 13 data based and non-data based challenges forward!
Hackathons are always a chance to meet like minded-people, sharpen your skills and think about new concepts for this dynamic and growing industry.

So be part of it:
Register until the 18th of April and take part to the online kickoff on Wednesday the 21st of April at 17:00.
The hackathon itself will also take place online on the 28th & 29th of April 2021. We send a little package at the beginning of next week, so make sure you are registered by then!
This event is co-organized by the HSLU, HotellerieSuisse, The Tourism Office Lab and opendata.ch.

Let’s Hack

- April 6, 2021 in Energie, event, food, hackathon, Hackday

Learnings at the Prototype Fund

- February 8, 2021 in Allgemein, event

Six months to develop a prototype to increase political participation in Switzerland. A daunting task. Who has accepted the challenge? 24 highly motivated people are currently tackling this endeavor in five project teams.

A few months into the program, it is time to look back. How did we fare?

Get to know the key learnings of the Prototype Fund team as well as the five project teams in six blogposts:

Meet the projects teams on the final Demo Day on 2 March

Are you ready for more fun and diversity in politics and tools for making digital participation realer? Then join us on 2 March 5.30-7.30pm to try out the Prototype Fund prototypes yourself and discuss with the project teams their plans and strategies. Register here and invite other Civic Tech enthusiasts via Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook or any other platform. You can find the detailed program on the Prototype Fund site.

Shape My City – Lucerne, the Results!

- January 19, 2021 in Bildung, Daten, Energie, event, Forschung, hackathon, Luzern, smart city

Almost in the same breath, following the Smart city Lab Lenzburg, we were happy to support the student team of the Master of Applied Information and Data Science at the HSLU in their organization of the Shape My City Hackdays – Luzern, a Hackathon revolving around smart city projects for Lucerne and its inhabitants. Around 110 participants gathered online, ready to hear about the 15 so-called challenges awaiting for a solution. Those issues opened by either the industry, civil society or city of Lucerne itself, were prepared in collaboration with group of students who helped defining the framework of the question and to gather and prepare relevant datasets, providing the Hackdays-teams with the material to solve the challenge itself. This event being a fully virtual workshop was not as vividly alive as what we are used to during the HSLU-student Hackdays, (melancholy…), still, the very funny slides and the clear engagement of the teams made for a very good event. Two inputs by Stefan Metzger CDO of the city of Luzern and by Benjamin Szemkus, Program manager of Smart City Switzerland, provided for background information about the strategies and perspective in the field. A lot of open data on the topic of smart cities was gathered, and last but not least and as always astonishing, the plethora of good results convinced us once again of the relevance of such collaborative endeavours. The challenge topics nicely completed or confirmed those issues addressed a few weeks before in Lenzburg. There too it was obvious that those location and user-specific solutions are actually relevant for a much broader public and regions. Nevertheless, implementing them locally still seems to be a meaningful and challenging enough step before exploring those broader fields. Most teams are willing and ready to keep on exploring the challenges with their challenge owners, we are curious to see how far the projects go from there on! Solar Energy in the City of Lucerne
Identifying similar buildings in terms of solar characteristics facilitates the approach to building owners to promote the installation of solar panels. The project group gathered over 15 different datasets, cleaning, preprocessing, analyzing and converting the datasets into desired shapes and Geospatial data formats. The prototype is as desired simply an excel file, containing the necessary information.  Disclaimer: data about the buildings are not publicly available and are to be considered as strictly confidential. Therefore, this part is private, however, the code is public. https://hack.opendata.ch/project/619 Consumer Behavior in the City of Lucerne
The project group worked on identifying Personas that will help to address the target groups on the topic of environmentally friendly behaviours. They also worked on analysing datasets to find interesting correlations and patterns concerning existing consumer behaviour.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/615 Quantification of Visitors of Cultural Events
The number of visitors from the surrounding municipalities attending events at cultural venues in Lucerne is not available yet. The project-team created a measurement tool that easily and efficiently registers the place of residence of the attendees of a cultural event. Drug Sharing Ecosystem Driven by Blockchain
This group implemented a Blockchain technology to visualizes exchanges and flows of drugs between main health stakeholders, in order to increase transparency, security and automation of drug exchanges. https://hack.opendata.ch/project/667 Open Social Spaces
Through the use of a web AR Application, locals can give a shape to their ideas. Users can place and visualize objects directly in a chosen location and vote for creations by others.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/605 360° Stakeholder Feedback Analysis
Large urban transformation projects require thorough analysis of the needs and requirements of all stakeholders involved. This project-team therefore worked on a Dashboard allowing grouping, qualification and prioritization of the stakeholders-related needs and information, in order to make more of the available data and provide decision-makers with a fast overview by project.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/656
https://colab.research.google.com/drive/1o492OCQthCJes2zYjfvJ_j1PU1Pc6spQ
2000 Watt Site – Reduction of Energy Consumption
This project-team worked on a gamification model and an app to inform and incentivize the reduction of energy consumption of households and help achieve the 2000 Watt Society goals. The system aims to compares households’ consumption as awareness is one of the motivations for new energy consumption strategies.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/655 Reduce Car Rides at Traffic Peak Hours
The project-team worked with an Agent-Based Traffic Modelling and Simulation Approach to predict and analyse the forseeable changes in traffic load for an area in planning.
They produced a SUMO file with a modeled traffic flow integrating the new conditions on the project site, as well as reflected on the tools and incentives for future traffic regulation on the area.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/616 Find Energy Inefficient Buildings in the City of Lucerne
As about 45 % energy usage is for buildings this team worked on a building-images database to identify potentially energy-intensive buildings, as well as on a gamified app-prototype to improve the quality oft he image collection, labelling and identifying thanks to collective intelligence.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/656 Interactive Visualizationfor Neighbourhood Residents
This team worked on visualizing existing data of small sub-quarters to gain insights about the facts, needs and participation interests of the residents in those neighbourhoods. The insights and visualisation will be integrated in the website to make the findings accessible to all residents.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/617
https://github.com/LinoSimoni 3D Geovisualization of building energy demands
In order to identify strategic leverage areas of high energy consumption, this team combined 3D data with energy demand data and revealed regions and buildings with potential for energy optimisation.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/657 Flat finder for seniors:
This team tackled the issue of the specific needs of the elderly when it comes to finding a suitable house or apartment. They created a housing platform that analyses housing advertisements from existing platforms and filters out those fitting the needs of seniors.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/618 Netto- Null in den Quartieren?
The demo created by this group allows to determine the current CO-2 emissions in the districts of Lucerne and to visualise which heating methods the buildings are using. This is a strategic information for decision makers for energy production methods and for the inhabitants to visualize the impact of one or the other heating system on the environment.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/613

Quality of Life in Lucerne
This working group focussed on generating new insights from an online questionnaire about Life quality in Lucerne for the city administration. They identified personas, expectations and new variables from the citizens answers.
https://hack.opendata.ch/project/658
https://github.com/EldhosePoulose/HackdaysLucerne-LifeQualityAnalysis

Energy Data Hackdays 2020, the results!

- October 6, 2020 in 2020, Brugg, Daten, Energie, Energy, event, Forschung, hackathon, Hackdays, machine learning, Optimization

The excitement of the new edition of the Energy Hackdays in Brugg was a bit special this year. Besides the usual sweet little heart pinch of the leap into a new group, the discovery of the challenges and the satisfaction of seeing this particular event repeating for the second time in Brugg, there was happiness but also respect about having the Energy Hackdays taking place mostly on site at the Hightech Zentrum Aarau. So we met in person and as far as we can say, it has been worth it! 13 really ambitious and technical challenges met 85 participants who were nonetheless ambitious and highly qualified! Two big themes emerged this year and predictions based on machine learning was one of them. Predicting performance, usage patterns, anomalies or even failure, in order to plan, use and maintain infrastructure more accurately.  Reaching these goals of course allows a much better resource and production management. The other big topic covered by several challenges was the question of visualization and interfaces, especially for smart-meters: How to help users, scientists, producers or end-consumers to read flows of data and allow them to interpret and decide or react appropriately to a given data supported information? How can they analyse and control different aspects of their infrastructure or installation? Tangent to this topic were challenges that attempted to allow a market overview for the consumer, in this case the market of E-Car charging stations, or to visualize the overall live electricity consumption of Switzerland. As far as I can judge and from what I heard from the challenge owners, the results blew us away! While the project descriptions might be a bit less accessible to the public than some from past hackdays, the approaches and results certainly correspond to a present need in the energy industry and comfort us in the conviction that hackathons and collaborative work with Open Data do support high-end innovation.
We were also very lucky to welcome the team of Campus 21 who harvested the visions of some of the participants for the future of Open Energy Data. See you all next year!
The 13 projects developed during the hackdays District Heating Optimisation   Decrease gas peak boiler runtime due to better storage operation: heat demand forecast, improved storage control, better storage operation. PV self-consumption optimization Evaluate and optimize trade-offs in the design of battery storage for PV systems, so our customer can select, whether they want the most economical battery solution or maximise their autarky. Our tools calculate the maximized economic benefit over lifetime. Read your own Smart Meter Read your Smart Meter through the local Customer Information Interface (CII) and visualize your consumption. Design a dashboard with the most useful information. Cheapest Charging around In order to develop the GIS platform of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) further: Add price information to the charging stations and find the cheapest option around for electric car drivers. Energy Data Visualization     Creating a platform for strategic decision making based on data from the Energy Science Center of ETH Zürich. e-mobility behavior analysis We analysed the charging patterns of private vs public e-cars charging stations. This could provide good hints for a further automated customer segmentation, help prediction of behavior changes for the load-curve vs renewable electricity production & help customers optimize their charging habits. Empower the People with Smart Meter Data Smart Meter Additional Use Cases: Novel energy certificate assesses where and how strongly building / user behaviour causes deviation from theoretical / optimum behaviour. ML Wind Power-Prediction Machine Learning Wind Turbine Power Curve Prediction: we compared constructor provided production projections with actual production curves with the goal to improve site-specific  performance prediction of wind turbines. – Development of machine learning algorithms  (or tools/aps) for improved site-specific  performance prediction of wind turbines. – Development of alternative algorithms e.g. Artificial Neural Networks – Inputs: wind velocity, turbulence intensity, shear factor (alpha) Put CH on the Electricity Map Help meet the Paris Convention goals to achieve net 0 by 2050, less than 2 tonnes CO2 per person! We want to raise awareness around energy use and consumption by putting Switzerland on the map at electricitymap.org and put its open data API to use. Distributed analytics for asset management The goal is to create a decision support tool for asset managers, using AI to predict how power transformers will fail, and what to watch out for. Anomaly Detection in Smart Meter Data We developed EDA and algorithms for the Anomaly Detection in Smart Meter Data challenge. We developed several approaches for detecting anomalous days based on mean and std of the readings during the day and for detecting single anomalous readings. These models can be integrated in the second part  of the challenge MeterOS: Smart Meter Anomaly Detection Create a model for Smartmeter Anomaly detector and their visualization. Unleashing the Swiss Smartmeter’s CII Empower citizens to use their energy data. Using the smartmeter’s CII beyond visualisation to steer local consumption.We developed a concept and PoC roadmap to provide a “universal” adapter from smart meters to home IoT platforms.

Opendata.ch/2020 Forum: From Data Visions to Action Points

- September 30, 2020 in event

Back in June we celebrated the 10th edition of our yearly forum. Where we talked about new data narratives and our visions for the data future. During the forum we held two workshops based on data visions to find concrete action points that we can do today to create a better (data) future.

New data visions

We called for our community to enter data visions which we then worked on in greater depth at the forum. From the 19 visions that were entered via our website, we selected eight to be treated during workshops. We are leaving the form open for entries, in case you would like to let us know about your data vision you can do so here. You can find the notes on the eight workshops in the table below.
Filling Female Data GapsA world where data is available without gender bias and gaps
Research Data ConnectomeTo connect and organize (meta)data for research sustainably across disciplines, in order to make it widely accessible, interoperable and valuable.
Serving, not SpyingIn ten years from now, I don’t feel observed and manipulated through the Data being collected about me but I can rely on being served by data for better services, better policies and a better environment.
Large Citizen Generated Open Data SetsResearch institutes routinely use large open data sets, where individuals have securely donated their anonymous high quality personal data of different kinds (e.g. contact tracing data, spatial data, shopping data, media consumption, etc.)
Better use of data in Switzerland 1 Public and private sector data is open, shared, and used for public and private good within a trustworthy data ecosystem (“Swiss / European DataSpace“).
Better use of data in Switzerland 2Public and private sector data is open, shared, and used for public and private good within a trustworthy data ecosystem (“Swiss / European DataSpace“).
Solid basis for committed debate and innovationData creates a critically discussable basis for political analysis and joint shaping of our future just as they enable innovations in everyday life – free access and responsible use are indispensable for an enlightened information society.
Open decentralized data storageData is a new form of currency: It is too powerful to be controlled by centralized private entities – let’s build a decentralized system to store, share and use data.
Shared ecosystem of energy data in SwitzerlandData about energy production and consumption is shared openly by Swiss utility companies, promoting open innovation and helping to reach the “Agenda 2030” climate goals.

Defining pain points and action points

From the eight visions that were proposed at the forum, seven were treated in two workshops. Unfortunately not enough people wanted to work on the vision«Large Citizen Generated Open Data Sets». However, the vision «Better use of data in Switzerland» proved to be so popular, that we had two groups working on it.  In the first workshop, the visions were first made more concrete, then the current situation was recorded and finally the pain points, i.e. the differences between vision and actual situation, were discussed and noted.  Based on these pain points, the accountable stakeholders were identified in the second workshop. Then action points were noted for these stakeholders, which they can and should address. You can read the overview of all pain points and action points here.

Pain points

The lack of data literacy was a pain point featured in most of the workshops. The lack of education on data appears to affect many areas. A further problem is the findability and accessibility of data. Even if you find a data set you need, doesn’t mean you can easily use it and integrate it into your research or project. This again is an issue that affects the whole data ecosystem. The second workshop picked up these pain points and after trying to assess the accountability for these developed several action points.

Choosing action points

Among the action points identified in the workshops, three were selected per vision and subjected to a vote on how urgently they should be tackled. Looking at the results of the voting process the following five action points appear to be the most urgent out of the 24 submitted to voting:
  1. Data Literacy: Stakeholder: Institutes and Departments & Research Support: Provide Trainings and Education Sessions. (111/135 points)
  1. Data providers: need to provide good data publication (e.g. publish high-quality data together with metadata), and secure unified open data licences. (110/135 points)
  1. Political decision makers: Provide an easy to understand  legal basis for clear data portability rules and for a decentralized data infrastructure (?). Enable (cantonal) pilots for digital participation. (108/135 points)
  1. Foster cooperation between data user and data provider. On the data user side this means  education (data literacy), good use cases und sustainable data Investment (not only Dashboards). (108/135 points)
  1. Public institutions (libraries, archives, educational institutions, data holders): Provide Infrastructure (as an alternative to Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, etc.) open for everybody. (107/135 points)
  1. Data producers: Be transparent about known flaws in data (it’s better to state/take on than “hide”) and actively seek feedback from data users, to provide better documentation, metadata, and to be able to curate data better. (106/135 points)
Improving data literacy, better data and documentation on it, better legal conditions, better cooperation between data users and data providers and better, more open source infrastructure, is therefore what we will be working toward in the future.  

Next steps

Thanks to the feedback we received, we are looking into ways to improve these priorities.  If you have an idea on how to actively tackle one of the action points mentioned above or you want to start a working group around one of these topics please let us know via info { at } opendata.ch On our side, we are already working on data literacy with our Data Café and school of data. We are routinely bringing together data providers and data users at our Hackdays where data providers can experience first hand how their data is being used. A guide on how to (better) publish open data is something we have been thinking about for a long time. It appears it’s not only our association that sees a need for this. We will try to find capacities not only to challenge but also to support data providers as far as that is our responsibility.

Open Farming Hackdays 2020

- September 21, 2020 in event, Farming, Hackday

Vom 4. bis 5. September fanden die ersten Open Farming Hackdays am Landwirtschaftlichen Zentrum Liebegg statt.

Elf neue Lösungsansätze

In nur 36 Stunden wurden die folgenden elf neuen Prototypen für die Landwirtschaft von morgen kreiert. Die gesunde Kuh: Früherkennung von Krankheiten zur Reduktion von Medikamenten-Einsatz. Cow Value hilft bei der Entscheidung ob eine Kuh weiter auf dem Hof bleibt oder geschlachtet werden soll. Decision Support Besamung hilft dabei den idealen Zeitpunkt für die Besamung einer Kuh zu finden. DorpAdvisor empfiehlt Parzellengenau die richtige Bewässerungsstrategie um den Wasserverbrauch und den Trockenstress für die Pflanzen zu minimieren. TRIVAtünder ist eine Austauschplattform für Hofdünger Stop Erosion, eine interaktive Karte, zeigt auf wo das Erosionsrisiko besonders hoch ist, damit gezielte Gegenmassnahmen getroffen werde können. Dank Open Source Felddaten können Neophyten erkannt, getaggt und automatisch auf einer Landkarte vermerkt werden. Databndlr vernetzt Konsumentinnen direkt mit den Produzentinnen. Farmpreneur hilft Bäuerinnen für die Zukunft zu planen EVAS erfasst die Auslaufzeit der Kühe Automatisch und reduziert so den Aufwand der Bäuerinnen. Mehr Biodiversität im Ackerbaugebiet zeig auf, wie man ebendiese erreichen könnte.

Begeisterte & engagierte Teilnehmende

Die Teilnehmenden hatten verschiedenste Hintergründe zum Teil ohne landwirtschaftliche Vorkenntnisse: «Motiviert hat mich, dass die zwei Bereiche Landwirtschaft und Hacking eher weit auseinander liegen und dass man daher extrem gut davon profitieren kann, wenn die zwei Bereiche näher zusammen arbeiten. Zudem habe ich keine Ahnung davon wie die Landwirtschaft funktioniert.» meinte einer der Teilnehmenden. Eine Teilnehmerin meinte dazu: «Vom thematischen inspiriert es mich enorm was für Leute hier zusammen kommen. Es ist mein erstes Mal an einem Hackathon und mit dabei sein zu können und sich auszutauschen und zu sehen wie andere Leute arbeiten war sehr spannend.» Markus Gusset, vom Bundesamt für Landwirtschaft, war als Challenge-Owner bei Stop Erosion dabei. 75% der Challenge hätten sie im Team lösen können. Zur Rolle von Open Data für seine Challenge meinte er: «Das war die Herausforderung. Nicht alles was wir brauchten um die Challenge anzugehen konnten wir mit öffentlich zugänglichen Daten lösen. Sogar beim Bund war es schwierig die Daten zur Weiterverarbeitung einzubinden. Du kannst sie nicht einfach weiterverarbeiten. Es gibt offene Daten die man ansehen und beziehen kann, aber man brauch zuerst eine Berechtigung für die Weiterverarbeitung. Das war eine Herausforderung für uns da man die Berechtigungen nicht einfach schnell an einem Wochenende erhalten kann.»

Impressionen

On the Way to the Digital Utopia

- May 26, 2020 in Allgemein, Daten, event, National

Opendata-2020-Visual
This year’s Opendata.ch/2020 Forum – New Data Narratives is all about the future of open data. But when we talk about the digital future, too often the conversation drifts off into very bleak, dystopian scenarios: transparent citizens, US Conglomerates leeching on our personal data and ubiquitous control enabled by Artificial Intelligence. But we refuse to believe that this is what the future has in store for us. As Erik Reece, Author of Utopia Drive, puts it: “…things will only get worse if we don’t engage in some serious utopian thinking.” And that is exactly what we (Francesca Giardini from Operation Libero and Nikki Böhler from Opendata.ch) did on Saturday, 22 February, at the Winterkongress 2020, and it’s also what Opendata.ch will do at this year’s forum by collecting data visions and working on them during a workshop at the forum. In our Winterkongress workshop ‘On the way to a digital Utopia’ we asked around 80 participants to turn negative future scenarios around and instead think about what a digital utopia might look.  We gave participants 10 frequently mentioned dystopian visions, each connected to an overarching theme, and asked them to imagine utopian counter examples and the measures necessary to make them reality. The results of our experiment (transcribed during the workshop) can be viewed below in German. Coming up with better solutions for our digital future is also the focus of our Opendata.ch/2020 Forum. We want to create new data narratives that steer away from dystopian scenarios and instead highlight the positive potential inherent in data technology. Come join us on 23 June online.

Results:

Gesellschaftlicher Bereich

Dystopisches Szenario (vorgegeben)

Utopische Umkehrung (durch Workshop Teilnehmende)

Zu ergreifende Massnahmen (durch Workshop Teilnehmende)

1. Ehrlichkeit

In der digitalen Dystopie sind wir nicht ehrlich mit unseren Mitmenschen, denn das digitale Denunziantentum hindert uns, Vertrauen ineinander zu fassen. Da wir uns ständig selbst zensieren, wird es für uns immer schwieriger, ehrlich zu uns selbst zu sein.

 

In der Utopie herrscht ein Netz mit verlässlichen Informationen und Austausch. Die Daten-Souveränität wird zurückgewonnen und dadurch das Recht über die eigenen Daten. Entsprechend können wir uns wieder sicher im Internet bewegen. Verlässliche Informationen sind verfügbar. Es wird transparent kommuniziert, was im Welt-Klimarat passiert, damit man weiss, wie man handeln kann. Transparenz ist ein zentrales Stichwort. Wir wissen, wie Informationen und Meinungen zustande kommen. Es existiert ein Recht auf Vergessen.

 

Die Datensouverenität wird gewährleistet, zum Beispiel über einen digitalen Avatar. Man kann selber bestimmen, wer die eigenen Daten auswertet. Es braucht in der Bildung mehr Schulung für Kritikfähigkeit. Wir müssen konferieren statt ausschliessen. Es gibt keine Zensur, sondern Einbinden. Die Technologie muss nachvollziehbar sein für die breite Masse, nicht nur für Programmiererinnen. Und es braucht einen Reset-Knopf mit Recht auf Vergessen. Der Staat darf sanktionieren (auf eine positive Art). Transparenz wird gefördert und vorgeschrieben.

 

2. Kriminalität

In der digitalen Dystopie sind wir alle sicher, weil Verbrechen vorhergesagt und die Täter/innen präventiv in Arbeitslager gesteckt werden. Hackerinnen haben keine Chance. Biases werden aufgelöst, da den Algorithmen alle Daten zur Verfügung stehen.

 

Es gibt keine Verurteilung ohne Tat. Durch die Datenlage wird die strukturelle Ursache von Kriminalität bekämpft, zum Beispiel durch freiwillige Präventionsmassnahmen auf gesellschaftlicher Ebene. Dadurch werden die individuellen Daten nicht gefährdet.

 

Die konsequente Einhaltung von Grund- und Menschenrechten wird garantiert. Strukturelle Ursachenbekämpfung ohne totalitär zu werden ist schwierig, weshalb es “open processes” braucht. Legiferierungsprozesse sollen transparent sein. Die Nachvollziehbarkeit ist wichtig. Was ist mit denen, welche die Dystopie als Utopie wahrnehmen? Mit denen müssen wir in einer politischen Entscheidungsfindung klar kommen.

 

3. Gerechtigkeit /

 Jurisdiktion

In der digitalen Dystopie hat man keine Möglichkeit, Entscheide anzufechten oder vor die nächste Instanz zu ziehen, denn die Rechtsprechung wird durch den vorprogrammierten Einsatz menschlicher Betätigung obsolet.

 

In der digitalen Utopie versteht jeder Mensch seine Rechte und wie sie sich auf die eigene Situation anwenden lassen. Juristische Informationsgewinnung ist zugänglich und effizient. Sinnlose und alte Gesetze werden über Bord geschmissen. Die Technologie hilft uns (der Bevölkerung) zu koordinieren, damit wir gemeinsam unser Recht einfordern können.

 

Es braucht ein Jus-Google Translate. Das bedeutet, Gesetzestexte können in verständliche Texte übersetzt werden, damit sie jeder verstehen kann. Zudem benötigen wir eine Rechtsberater-App oder ein Netzwerk, damit jeder Unterstützung erhalten kann. Dafür braucht es eine Software, welche open source ist. Zudem muss der Mensch “on the loop” oder “in the loop” sein. Und es muss sichergestellt werden, dass jede Entscheidung nachvollzogen werden kann.

 

4. Gesetzgebung

In der digitalen Dystopie ist die Gesellschaft nicht durch demokratisch erarbeitete/legitimierte Gesetze reguliert, sondern durch den fest einprogrammierten Code in der Gesellschafts-Betriebssoftware.

 

In der digitalen Utopie gibt es keine Gesellschafts-Betriebssoftware, sondern eine Vorschlagssoftware, welche die Interessen bewertet und Ratschläge gibt. Dabei wird ein Lobby-Filter angewandt und ein transparentes Informationssystem gewährleistet. Zudem dominiert die menschliche Kontrolle.

 

Es braucht einen agilen Code. Die Software dafür muss in interdisziplinären Teams mit Ethikexpertinnen, Sozialwissenschaften und Technologieexpertinnen entwickelt werden. Die Software muss frei und offen sein. Auf gesellschaftlicher Ebene braucht es einen Rahmen, mit sichergestellten Menschenrechten. Das Narrativ ändern. Der Staat ist gefragt: Die entsprechende Bildung und dazugehörigen Kompetenzen müssen sichergestellt werden. Der Journalismus ist dafür auch sehr wichtig, weil viele der Narrative momentan von den Firmen stammen. Die Frage stellt sich: Wie kann die Software überwacht oder kontrolliert werden? Eine behördliche Instanz überwacht das und vergibt vielleicht auch Aufträge. Zusätzlich braucht es eine gesellschaftliche Instanz, die über alles wacht.

 

5. Wettbewerb

In der digitalen Dystopie entfällt der wirtschaftliche Wettbewerb, da sich durch Skalierungs- und Netzwerkeffekte 3-4 globale Unternehmenskonglomerate herausgebildet haben, welche nun die Volkswirtschaften einzelner Nationen diktieren.

 

Wollen wir Plattformen aufbrechen? Oder erbringen Plattformen Nutzen? Will man die Plattformen regulieren? Wir sind auf der zweiten Schiene. Plattformen sollen Infrastrukturen sein (wie Strom oder Verkehr), welche staatlich zur Verfügung gestellt werden. Dieses Konzept wird verbunden mit dem souveränen Eigentum an Daten.

 

Als Pendant zum Plattform-Kapitalismus entsteht “Digital Commons”. Plattformen bleiben bestehen, aber tragen zum Gemeinnutzen bei. Datensouverenität ist ein grosses Thema. Auf gesellschaftlicher Ebene wird der Aspekt der digitalen Kompetenz sehr relevant (man weiss, wie die Mechanismen funktionieren, was sie wollen und, dass man Kunde ist). Dafür braucht es die entsprechende Bildung. Auf technologischer Ebene herrscht “Privacy by Default” mit Opt-in Charakteristik. Es gibt klare Standards für Neutralität. Dadurch wird findet Chancen-Nivellierung statt und Interoperabilität existiert. Aggregierte Intelligenz soll nicht “festkleben”. Auf staatlicher Ebene heisst das, dass wir Bereitstellung von anonymisierten Datensätzen (Datensouverenität) für geprüfte Dienstleistungen sicherstellen. Dafür müssen Frameworks erarbeitet werden, um zu definieren, welche Daten wo erhoben werden dürfen. Daten sind nicht böse, sondern müssen rekontextualisiert werden.

 

6. Lohnarbeit

In der digitalen Dystopie entscheidet ein Algorithmus, wo welche menschlichen Fähigkeiten am effektivsten eingesetzt werden. Wir haben keine Wahl und werden mal hier mal da eingesetzt, um der internationalen Wirtschaft zu dienen.

 

Dank der Automatisierung oder der Besteuerung können wir ein bedingungsloses Grundeinkommen einführen. Dadurch wird Arbeit neu definiert: Die wenigen Ziele, die Mann / Frau erreichen muss, sind für das Allgemeinwohl und unter gesicherten Arbeitsstandards zu vollbringen. Eventuell kann der Algorithmus Angebot und Nachfrage meiner Fähigkeiten prüfen und matchen (mit transparenten Kriterien).

 

Bedingungsloses Grundeinkommen schafft die Basis, um von der Dystopie wegzukommen. Dadurch kommen wir hin zu einer Utopie, in welcher wir bestimmen können. Wir haben Geld zur Verfügung, um Jobs nicht notwendigerweise anzunehmen. Der Staat gibt die gesetzlichen Rahmenbedingungen vor. Arbeit wird neu bewertet und Fähigkeiten werden neu bewertet. Es geht um Gemeinwohl, statt um finanzielle Rendite. Dafür sind Schulen und Schulungen gefragt, um individuum zu ermächtigen. Bereits in der Kita muss man anfangen. Die Technologie wird wieder Dienstleister. Es existiert ein transparenter Open-Source Filter, um unsere Jobwahl zu unterstützen, wobei keine Entscheidungsgewalt beim Algorithmus liegt.

 

7. Vertrauen

In der digitalen Dystopie haben wir keine Möglichkeit und Befugnis, Rechenschaft zu verlangen. Wir vertrauen weder der Regierung, noch einander, da sich alle hinter den technisch unterstützten Entscheiden verstecken können und digitales Denunziantentum gefördert wird.

 

Auf einer Regierungsebene muss Transparenz herrschen, um Vertrauen zu stärken. Entscheidungen müssen transparent gefällt und von Menschen getragen werden.

 

Die Sozialkompetenz ist wichtig, um Vertrauen zu schaffen. Diese Kompetenz soll an der Schule gestärkt werden. Dafür müssen auch die Lehrerinnen Sozialkompetenzen trainieren, in der Lehrerausbildung. Das reicht nicht fürs ganze Leben, weshalb Weiterbildung sehr wichtig ist. Vor dem Bildschirm verändert sich die Anforderung an diese Kompetenz nochmals. Deshalb braucht es zusätzlich eine Sensibilisierung für die Spezialitäten des digitalen Raumes. Es muss möglich sein, Rechenschaften einzufordern. Das geht bereits, aber ist sehr kompliziert. Hürde für Rechenschaftsablegung senken mit Digitalisierung, anstatt auf Briefpost warten.

 

8. Demokratie

In der digitalen Dystopie ist die Demokratie faktisch überflüssig geworden, denn durch demoskopische Datenerhebungen weiss die digital gestärkte Regierung immer schon im Voraus, wie wir über welches Thema denken.

 

Digitale Mittel werden für dezentrale und inklusive Meinungsbildung genutzt. Zwischen Experten und politisch Gebildeten findet mehr Austausch statt. Die Datenerhebung ist demokratisch öffentlich und transparent.

 

Das Problem ist, dass ein Spannungsfeld zwischen Anonymität und Transparenz besteht. Es muss die technische Möglichkeit bestehen, eine anonyme Stimmabgabe sicherzustellen. Sonst muss es analog passieren. Es werden Technologien und Plattformen gefördert, welche die dezentrale Meinungsbildung ermöglichen. Diese darf nicht privatwirtschaftlich verzerrt sein. Es soll möglichst niedrige Hürden geben, um sich politisch zu beteiligen. Es braucht staatlich gesetzliche Rahmenbedingungen, wie Lobby Control. Die Gesellschaft muss bereit sein, diese Chancen wahrzunehmen und das dystopische Denkmuster zu verlassen.

 

9. Gesundheit

In der digitalen Dystopie haben wir keine Befugnis, unsere Gesundheit selbst zu managen oder eigene Entscheidungen zu fällen. Individuelle und gesellschaftliche Gesundheit-Massnahmen werden massgeschneidert vom internationalen Health-Algorithmus vorgegeben.

 

In der digitalen Utopie haben wir die Befugnis, unsere Gesundheit zu managen. Massnahmen werden von einem offenen Algorithmus vorgeschlagen. Eigene Präferenzen können angewandt werden.

 

Es braucht Open-Source Software, Datenhoheit, Wahlfreiheit und Anonymisierung. Die Krankenkassen müssen entsprechend eingestellt werden, damit es nicht mehr um Kostenoptimierung sondern um Solidarität geht. Für die Datenhoheit sollte eine Zweckbindung der Daten technisch sicher umsetzt werden (es wird technisch sichergestellt, dass Daten nur dafür genutzt werden, wofür sie freigegeben worden sind). Wenn ein gutes elektronisches Patientendossier da wäre, wäre das eine gute Grundlage. Transparenz und Aufklärung der Bevölkerung sind auch wichtige Punkte.

 

Kommunikation

In der digitalen Dystopie ist die Digitale Kommunikation in jedem Falle und von allen einsehbar, weder Verschlüsselungstechnik noch neue Formen der Kommunikation bieten wirklich Schutz. Unsere Kommunikation ist zudem eingeschränkt und in vorgegebene Bahnen gelenkt.

 

In der digitalen Utopie sind unsere Kommunikation und unsere Daten sicher verschlüsselt. Dennoch greifen Mechanismen zum Schutz der Menschenwürde. Gar keine Kontrolle kann auch gefährlich sein.

 

Es wurde eine Debatte über die Infrastrukturanforderungen geführt. Es braucht die Verschlüsselung der Kommunikation. Müssten wir die Plattformen (die hinter der Kommunikation stehen) so weit runterbrechen, dass es wieder Peer to Peer ist? Auf der technischen Seite braucht es Kryptologie ohne Backdoors. Wie kriegen wir das hin, dass sich die Toleranz in der Gesellschaft so weit verbreitet, dass Hate Speech kein Problem mehr ist und Minderheitenschutz automatisch gewährleistet ist.

 

 

 

#VersusVirus Hackathon

- April 14, 2020 in Allgemein, Daten, event

Dear friends of open data, From 3 April to 5 April, over a period of 48 hours, Swiss civil society came together to use their collective intelligence, inspiration and knowledge to come up with concrete solutions to the problems caused by the COVID19 pandemic crisis. The result was «the biggest sharing and caring experience that Switzerland has ever seen»: the #VersusVirus Online Hackathon. 4’500 participants in 263 teams with more than 500 mentors worked on 190 submitted challenges and came up with 279 projects (with the support of over 60 datasets and resources), with 24 members of parliament and Federal Council Alain Berset also joining in the effort. We at Opendata.ch are proud to have been involved in this exhilarating and inspiring event. Of the 263 teams that submitted their ideas, each and every one made a valuable contribution to this monumental effort and deserves respect and recognition. You can find a comprehensive list of all submitted projects here. Furthermore, you can find an open list of relevant datasets and other resources here. We would also like to take the opportunity to mention a few projects that we found particularly inspiring:
  • pandemia-parliament: It is imperative that Parliaments are able to debate and make decisions during times like these. Yet the Covid-19 pandemic has forced members of parliament to stay home and thus brought the democratic process to a near standstill. Pandemia-parliament is an online space where parliamentary business can be conducted in a safe, transparent fashion, thereby bringing politicians back to work.
  • Swissrefucare: Refugees in Switzerland and elsewhere are at a higher risk of getting infected with COVID-19 because they live in small shared spaces and do not always have access to necessary hygienic products. The platform connects refugees with Swiss authorities and with Swiss citizens and thereby aims to help in improving their situation.
  • Covidfact: Citizens are overloaded with information related to COVID-19 and they don’t know which data source to rely on and where to find answers. “Covidfact” is a bot using the knowledge of experts to provides 24/7 and up-to-date information on the crisis based on trustworthy facts, guidelines and tips to help people get through this crisis with confidence. 
  • Fast2Gov: Software helping Swiss cantons to collect, aggregate and share reports and follow up on every patient in a fast, complete and accurate manner while protecting privacy of patients & healthcare professionals
You can find more dataful results in these blogposts by Oleg. The corona crisis has shown why openness is important. Our association’s mandate and independent approach – all for one and one for all – remains true. We are supporting open data activities across all hackathons, platforms and confessions. We have a prerogative to be active community partners to e-government. And the #VersusVirus Hackathon has proven that together we can jump on chances to boost discovery of new and alternative open datasets and the open source apps that use them. But there is much more work to do! Get in touch with us to give us your feedback or contributions. Stay home and stay healthy!Ps. In Case you are not an Opendata.ch member yet, you can change that here.

Nordisk-baltisk samarbejde om open data relateret til anti-korruption

- October 22, 2019 in åben data, begivenhed, event, Government, internationalt, offentlige data, OGP, Workshop

Workshop om åben data og politisk integritet i Riga 2019 (CC0)

Workshop om åben data og politisk integritet i Riga 2019 (CC0)

Open Knowledge Danmark var med da nordiske og baltiske repræsentanter fra Open Knowledge og Transparency  International mødtes til en workshop med temaet “Building a Nordic Anti-Corruption Data Ecosystem” i Riga, oktober 2019. Der blev arbejdet på udfordringer omkring anti-korruptions data: Hvad er situationen i de forskellige lande? Hvilke barrierer for åbenhed om politiske data møder vi? Hvordan kan vi samarbejde og hjælpe hinanden? Der blev blandt andet drøftet partistøtteregler, lobbyregistre, offentlige indkøb, landenes deltagelse i Open Government Partnership, politikeres deklarationer af personlige interesser, parlamentarisk overvågning, open data vs. GDPR. Workshoppen er del af et projekt, der også omfatter en nordisk eksplorativ rundspørge om åbne data relateret til politisk integritet. Deltagende organisationer (ud over os): Open Knowledge Sverige, Transparency International Finland, Estland, Letland og Litauen).