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Women in data can help tackle gender inequality

- September 10, 2019 in data literacy, Events, gender, News

Encouraging more women and girls to learn data skills can help tackle gender inequality and build a more diverse society, a conference will hear today. Speaking at the annual ‘Doing Data Right’ conference in Edinburgh, Open Knowledge Foundation chief executive Catherine Stihler will call on governments to do more to engage young women in data skills, particularly outwith maths and science. She will argue that this will help empower more women to use data to improve their local communities, their cities and their countries. Former MEP for Scotland Ms Stihler will call for more citizen-generated data through schools, libraries, churches and community groups to generate high-quality data relating to gender equality and diversity, as well as other issues such as air quality and climate action. Ms Stihler is speaking at The Scotsman conference, Doing Data Right: Through people and partnerships, on a panel on ‘Women in data’ – along with campaigner and writer Caroline Criado Perez, Gillian Hogg of Heriot-Watt University, and Talat Yaqoob of Equate Scotland. Speaking ahead of the event, Open Knowledge Foundation chief executive Catherine Stihler said:
“Governments across the world must work harder to give everyone access to key information and the ability to use it to understand and shape their lives, building a fair, free and open future. “Without data skills, people will be ill-equipped to take on many jobs of the future. “We need to encourage more women and girls to learn data skills, particularly outwith subjects such as maths and science.

“These skills will then pave the way for pioneering new ways of producing and harnessing citizen-generated data through schools, libraries, churches and community groups, which in turn can help tackle gender inequality, build a more diverse society, and address issues such as climate change and air quality.”

Women in data can help tackle gender inequality

- September 10, 2019 in data literacy, Events, gender, News

Encouraging more women and girls to learn data skills can help tackle gender inequality and build a more diverse society, a conference will hear today. Speaking at the annual ‘Doing Data Right’ conference in Edinburgh, Open Knowledge Foundation chief executive Catherine Stihler will call on governments to do more to engage young women in data skills, particularly outwith maths and science. She will argue that this will help empower more women to use data to improve their local communities, their cities and their countries. Former MEP for Scotland Ms Stihler will call for more citizen-generated data through schools, libraries, churches and community groups to generate high-quality data relating to gender equality and diversity, as well as other issues such as air quality and climate action. Ms Stihler is speaking at The Scotsman conference, Doing Data Right: Through people and partnerships, on a panel on ‘Women in data’ – along with campaigner and writer Caroline Criado Perez, Gillian Hogg of Heriot-Watt University, and Talat Yaqoob of Equate Scotland. Speaking ahead of the event, Open Knowledge Foundation chief executive Catherine Stihler said:
“Governments across the world must work harder to give everyone access to key information and the ability to use it to understand and shape their lives, building a fair, free and open future. “Without data skills, people will be ill-equipped to take on many jobs of the future. “We need to encourage more women and girls to learn data skills, particularly outwith subjects such as maths and science.

“These skills will then pave the way for pioneering new ways of producing and harnessing citizen-generated data through schools, libraries, churches and community groups, which in turn can help tackle gender inequality, build a more diverse society, and address issues such as climate change and air quality.”

First decade of Open Data in Finland -events 8.-10.10.

- June 12, 2019 in Events, Featured

Come celebrate the first decade of open data in Finland with Open Knowledge Finland and Helsinki Region Infoshare, 8th to 10th October 2019! Participate in three days of workshops and events culminating in a celebration at the Helsinki City Hall. Tuesday 8.10.2019 Location: Maria 01 startup center, Helsinki 12-13 Lunch at Starter (own cost) 13-21: Presentations and workshops Please sign up to the workshops beforehand, as attendance is limited. https://forms.gle/qgn9FH243DzrF4Ss7   Wednesday 9.10.2019 Location: Kuntatalo, Helsinki   Thursday 10.10.2019 Location: Helsinki City Hall Time: 12-16 + drinks Highlights from the 10 years of Finland’s journey into open data. Meet the makers, the deciders, the inventors, the creators, and the experts! Programme and speakers will be published here shortly. Be part of mapping out the next 10 years of Finland’s open data adventure, and stay for drinks and networking after 4pm.   Please sign up for the gala event. https://forms.gle/uZ2sKYUnhNjHweZh7 The post First decade of Open Data in Finland -events 8.-10.10. appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

FairBNB kickoff!

- May 27, 2019 in Events, Featured

Do you want to be involved in launching and developing a short-stay rental platform that really complies with the principles of a fair, non-extractive and collaborative economy? WELCOME TO MARIA01 (CORNER ROOM) TUESDAY 4.6 AT 19:00 TO THE KICK-OFF EVENT OF The Fairbnb.coop journey started in 2016 as a movement seeking to create an alternative to existing home-sharing platforms with a focus on commons and 100% respectful with legality. The first hotspots were Venice and Amsterdam but soon other groups from all over Europe joined the debate and helped us shaping the final model that we are seeking to implement. In late 2018 we created a co-op to be the legal entity behind a fair, collectively-owned and transparent booking platform. A platfrom that will allow travelers to find lawful accommodations while facilitating meaningful travel and community participation and which will reinvest 50% of its revenue to support local communities.

Why Fair?

+We’re transparent. We share our data with local governments so cities can know the real impact of tourism.
+ We’re compliant with local regulation and complement them with suggestions of additional policies by local communities.
+ 1 host – 1 home policy. We avoid multi-host in the platform, to ease the effect of over-tourism over the residential accommodation.

Why a Co-op?

+We are independent. Our platform is owned not by faceless investors but by those who use it and are impacted by its use
+Co-ownership + Co-Governance. Decisions are made collaboratively under a distributed governance.
+We are community centered. In order to rebuild communities, 50% of profits are reinvested in social projects that counter the negative effects of tourism.

Why Community Centered?

  • We foster local economies: Half of the commission charged by Fairbnb is returned to the local community, sustaining projects selected by local residents.
  • Local nodes are at the center of our organization and represent the engine that connect the people in the territories making human interaction the real “technology” of Fairbnb.coop
We are bringing bringing the fairbnb cooperative to Finland and setting up a local node. We are looking for people who can help build the network, the platform, find hosts to join the platform and projects to be funded through the commission charged by fairbnb and help with the crowdfunding campaign. Please join us on this journey – This is collective action that can really change things in our cities! Sign up at: FB event  Meetup For more information check out these links:
https://fairbnb.coop/get-involved/
https://www.facebook.com/Fairbnbcoop/ The post FairBNB kickoff! appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Open Knowledge Night: Disinformation and fact checking with Faktabaari

- April 25, 2019 in Events, Featured

How can investigative journalism and data tools work together? If you’re interested in using data analytics skills, learning about tools used in journalism and data journalism, or just understanding how mis- and disinformation can be detected, this evening is for you!
OKFI and Faktabaari are organising this event together!
Date: Tuesday, May 7th
Time: 5pm onwards
Place: Päivälehden museo, Helsinki Sign up at Meetup.com (link to appear shortly) Starting this spring, fact checking service Faktabaari focuses more on carrying out investigations against online disinformation. To make it possible, tools are needed. Faktabaari has acquired Trendolizer for finding out what is trending on the web and for tracking sources. Trendolizer is a creation of Belgian fact checking wizard Maarten Schenk, also behind fact checking site Lead Stories. Faktabaari also has requested access for a platform of the European Observatory against Disinformation. The platform is based on Truly Media which is co-developed by ATC and Deutsche Welle and verification tool TruthNest. These kind of tools have been acquired primarily because of EU elections, but it is good to look beyond them. Fact check, investigative journalism and data experts will certainly have common interests, they just have to find them. Tentative program:
  • Short introduction to fact checking and related tools
  • Knowledge crystals as potential tools for crowdsourced fact checking
  • Data analytics and open data tools for fact checking
  • Networking and idea generation
The post Open Knowledge Night: Disinformation and fact checking with Faktabaari appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

On the trail of OE policy co-creation

- April 24, 2019 in copyright, Events, Featured, oer, Policy

By Javiera Atenas & Leo HavemannWe’ve recently returned from the OER19 conference in Galway, Ireland, where we had the opportunity of running the third edition of the Open Education Policy Co-creation (OEPC) workshop, and the outcomes were very interesting! But let’s start from the beginning. This workshop was originally developed in the context of the OpenMed project, to support the project stakeholders to develop Open Education Policies following the Recommendations from OpenMed to University leaders and policy makers for opening up Higher Education in the South-Mediterranean by 2030. The workshop aimed to give the project stakeholders some basic policy co-design skills, and as well as an overview of the key techniques and elements needed to opening up the arenas to foster sustainable policies. In order to support these objectives the workshop is grounded on the participation and co-creation standard developed by OGP to foster the co-creation of national commitments, and uses a set of cards and a canvas (adapted from those developed by the UK Policy Lab) aligning the elements with those recommended by the Ljubljana Action Plan, and the JRC report, Policy Approaches to Open Education. The workshop elements aim at raising awareness of the international Landscape towards widening participation including a wide range of stakeholders, while, being resourceful, optimistic and flexible, to ensure that the policy design addresses the co-creation process in a specific context, involving a wide range of policy design partners to ensure the correct implementation, overseeing the opportunities and challenges of an OE policy, and the key elements these must comprise providing the evidence needed to support the stakeholders and to prevent risks of policy derailment.   The OE policy workshop fosters the assessment of data, research and experiences from national and international perspectives related to the socio-economic, political and cultural context in what is known as global policy convergence [Haddad & Demsky (1995); Thompson & Cook (2014)]

From Rome to Warsaw

We piloted the OEPC workshop at the OpenMed conference (Rome) with a group of stakeholders from Egypt, England, Italy, Jordan, Morocco, Palestine and Spain. Then, with Fabio Nascimbeni we re-tested the methodology at the OE Policy Forum (Warsaw), with stakeholders from Germany, Malta, Poland, Romania, Spain, Slovenia, Sweden and The Netherlands. In both pilots, the participants agreed that core processes and partners for OE policy-making were co-design and collaboration, which should include not only senior management but academics, librarians and experts in copyright, as these could provide a wide range of perspectives related to their local contexts and needs. Also, the participants mentioned as stakeholders the need to work alongside with Open Science, Open Access and OE experts and policymakers to foster cohesion in Open Policies.

OpenMed Policy Forum

Regarding solutions and approaches, the participants mentioned the need to include experts in accreditation systems and copyright regulations, as these policy opportunities are key to foster sustainability in OE policy making, but also, are possible challenges and barriers for promoting the adoption of Open Educational Practices, alongside the lack of copyright and IP understanding, and scarce awareness of open practices amongst faculty, senior management, and policymakers, which prevent the acknowledgment of Open Practices for career progression, and, also diminish the chances for obtaining funding to implement OE policies. So, in order to enable an OE policy, the participants mentioned as key elements the recognition of Open Practices and accreditation of Open Learning were key, as these elements, can provide evidence to promote the adoption of Open Education alongside with international good practices, data on cost-benefits of OER, national educational data and performance data to showcase the impact of Open Education.

Centrum Cyfrowe – Open Education Policy Forum

According to the participants of the first two pilots, the main beneficiaries of an OE policy are learners and educators, however, families, general public, universities and governments can also benefit from Open Education by lowering costs of access to education while widening participation, although, the groups mentioned that it is key to be aware of the risks that an OE policy may face, are lack of political understanding of openness, as well as datafication and commodification of education and also, lobbying from commercial publishers and ed-tech vendors might severely impact upon  or derail an OE policy initiative.

From Warsaw to Galway

With all this information in hand, and after carefully updating the kit according to the feedback given by the pilot participants, we ran a new edition of our workshop, billed as Fostering Openness in Education: considerations for sustainable policy making at OER19, in which over 20 participants from Ireland, England, Scotland, Austria, The Netherlands, Australia and Spain participated. For them, in order to foster co-creation of OE policies, processes such as the involvement of communities of practices and use spaces in global conferences are key, and also, the use of consultations and roundtables to discuss the policy at different stages. When discussing the policy context, the participants mentioned the importance of acknowledging the voices of diverse groups to ensure inclusivity, considering the level of access to technological infrastructure. When talking about Policy Design Partners the participants agree that educators, policy makers, librarians, learning technologists and education experts need to be involved, while others mentioned the need to include learners. While discussing opportunities and challenges, the participants mentioned collaboration, innovation, chances to flourish and improvement of quality and access to education as key opportunities while, they highlighted as challenges, the commodification of education and conflicts of interest and agendas between negotiations between institutions and technology suppliers.

Pic by Virginia Rodés

In relation to the key elements of an OE policy, the participants highlighted transparent practices, and bench-learning from existing policies in order to include accreditation and recognition of Open Learning, and also, to have elements that enable  measurement of the impact of the policy, as impact data can be further reused by other institutions willing to develop their policies as evidence, including for example student success rates, uptake rates, learner engagement and amount of resources created and used. This evidence can provide data for recognition of educators’ good practices, towards benefiting two groups of key stakeholders learners and the society as a whole through the provision of Open Content. Finally, in relation to risks, the participants mentioned the lobby of commercial textbook publishers and from educational corporations taking advantage of Open Content to profit commercially.

From Galway to London

Following the Galway workshop, we have reviewed and compared the outcomes of the three workshops and found some fascinating stuff. Regarding processes in the Rome pilot, most of the discussion focused on the co-creation process, as for the participants, policy-making was most likely related to the governance processes and to senior management activities, as for the groups in Warsaw, it was key to connect OE with other educational reforms, and to align it with their Open Government Partnership strategies, while in Galway, the keyword was collaboration, as they saw the opportunity for fostering collective ownership when a policy is co-created. Regarding the policy context, for the groups in Rome, the need was related with the need of promoting innovation to enhance the quality of education in a context of overcrowded classrooms, while in Warsaw, lots of the discussion focused on the need of having content in national languages, and in Galway the key idea was inclusion and diversity, to provide learners with the content they need. When discussing Policy Design Partners the participants in Rome highlighted the importance of involving international OE experts and the group in Warsaw mentioned learning technologists and copyright experts while in Galway, librarians and academics were mentioned. In relation with to policy opportunities, the groups in Rome mentioned access to quality educational materials and opportunities for distance learning, while in Warsaw, OE policies were seen as a mean to defeat the EU copyright reform and in Galway, the concepts of co-creation and collaboration to foster bottom-up policies was seen as a great advantage. In regards with the challenges, in Rome, the biggest one mentioned was overcrowding of classrooms and little flexibility for open learning accreditation, while in Warsaw the EU copyright reform and the ruthless publishers’ lobby was seen as a major threat. For the groups in Rome, Warsaw and Galway, the key elements were accreditation of open learning, and recognition of open education practices for career progression. For the participants in Rome, the key evidence was good practices on the use and production of OER at an international level, while in Warsaw, it was important to provide data on cost-benefits of OER, and in Galway, success rates, uptake rates and learning engagement data as key to foster an OE policy. Finally, the key stakeholders for the group in Rome were learners, educators and universities while for the Warsaw group governments were also key, and for the participants in Galway, the group extended to the society as a whole. In regards with the risks, the group in Rome mentioned lack of political understanding of openness, while the participants in Warsaw, were concerned about the current wave of datafication, commodification and marketisation of education and furthermore, worried at the tactics used by publishers and ed-tech vendors/gurus, as this set of practices were of potential danger not only to OE but to education in general, and this concern was widely replicated in the Galway session. Is interesting to see that in some cases the groups see elements from different perspectives, and while for the groups in Warsaw and in Galway shared some concerns regarding datafication and copyright, the participants in Rome were more concerned by the lack of IT literacies. It is also interesting each group, without being connected, builds on top of each other, and that for all the international OE community it is key to foster sustainable OE policies that can provide evidence of good practices to promote the adoption of OE.

From London to Lisbon

Our next stop is Lisbon, we will be holding another  OE policy co-creation workshop at the CC summit, so join us Friday, May 10th from 3:30pm – 4:25pm.

Pic by Javiera Atenas

 

Next stops

If you think that your institution or a consortium of institutions may benefit from this open policy-making exercise, please get in touch with Leo Havemann <leo.havemann@open.ac.uk> or with Javiera Atenas <javiera.atenas@idatosabiertos.org>  

References

Haddad, W. D., & Demsky, T. (1995). Education policy-planning process: an applied framework Fundamentals of educational planning—51. Paris: UNESCO: International Institute for Educational Planning. Retrieved from http://www.unesco.org/education/pdf/11_200.pdf Thompson, G., & Cook, I. (2014). Education policy-making and time. Journal of Education Policy, 29(5), 700–715.https://doi.org/10.1080/02680939.2013.875225   —

About the authors

Javiera Atenas: PhD in Education and co-coordinator of the Open Education Working Group, responsible for the promotion of Open Data, Open Policies and Capacity Building in Open Education. She is also a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and the Education Lead at the Latin American Initiative for Open Data [ILDA] as well as an academic and researcher with interest in the use of Open Data as Open Educational Resources and in critical pedagogy. @jatenas  
Leo Havemann: Is a Digital Education Advisor at University College London, and a postgraduate researcher in open education at the Open University. He is a co-ordinator of the M25 Learning Technology Group. His research interests include open educational practices, skills and literacies, blended learning, and technology-enhanced assessment and feedback. He has taught in HE in New Zealand and Australia, worked as a librarian in a London FE college, and worked in IT roles in the private sector. He has a Master’s degree from the University of Waikato. He can be followed as @leohavemann on Twitter.
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Open Knowledge Foundation community meet up at csv,conf,v4

- April 16, 2019 in #CSVconf, Events

  • When: May 7th, 5-7pm
  • Location: Eliot Center, Portland, OR
  • Cost: Free; pizza & beverages available
Join Open Knowledge Foundation (OKF) for a community event the night before csv,conf,v4! This meet and greet happy hour will feature lightning talks on open projects, designated networking time, and pizza. We invite OKF community members to submit ideas for short lightning talks (5 minutes maximum). Do you want to give a talk, but aren’t already a member of the OKF community? No problem! We are an inclusive community of Open enthusiasts (open data, open science, open source, open government, etc), and the evening is open to anyone who wants to share their ideas. Come learn more about what we do, the open projects our members are working on, ways to get involved with an open project, and meet others! This event is open to all (including csv,conf,v4 attendees as well as other open enthusiasts).     More about csv,conf,v4 csv,conf is a community conference for data makers everywhere, bringing diverse groups together to discuss data topics, and featuring stories about data sharing and data analysis from science, journalism, government, and open source. It takes place from May 8-9 2019 at the Eliot Center in Portland, Oregon. More information on the program is available from the website, and you can still get your conference tickets on Eventbrite.   More about Open Knowledge Foundation (OKF): OKF is a global non-profit organisation and worldwide network of people passionate about openness, and using advocacy, technology and training to unlock information and enable people to work with it to create and share knowledge. Chat with us on Gitter, join a discussion on our Forum, or check out our projects for ways to get involved!

Avoimuuden vaalipaneeli 2019

- March 15, 2019 in elections, Events, Featured, vaalit

Tule mukaan vaalipaneeliin kuulemaan puolueiden näkökulmia digimaailmaan ja avoimeen dataan. 1.4.2019 Helsingissä, Maria01:ssä. Miten rakentaa kilpailukykyistä, digitaalista Suomea, jossa on hyvä elää yhdessä älykkäiden robottien kanssa? Miten Suomi voisi ottaa osuutensa globaalista alusta- ja datataloudesta?  Miten saada mydata töihin reilulla tavalla, millainen on turvallinen kyberinfra? Miten saada suomalainen sote-aarrearkku hyötykäyttöön – vai onko henkilötietojen toissijainen käyttö ja yksityisyyden suoja ratkaisematon epäyhtälö? Miten taata avoin demokratia trollien ja jatkuvien aprillipäivien aikana? Tervetuloa maksuttomaan avoimuuden vaalipaneeliin, jossa tulevaisuuden tietoyhteiskunnasta keskustelevat Timo Harakka (SDP), Jyrki Kasvi (vihreät), Kristo Lehtonen (keskusta) ja Jouni Markkanen (kokoomus). Ilmoittaudu mukaan. Lisätietoja COSSin sivuilta. The post Avoimuuden vaalipaneeli 2019 appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Open Data Day 2019: 2nd March

- February 28, 2019 in Events, Open Data Day

Protecting libraries and the vital role they play in local communities

- February 27, 2019 in Events, library, Open GLAM, OpenGLAM

This article was originally published in The Scotsman. With councils across the UK facing major financial pressures, libraries are too often seen as an easy target for cuts. In 2017, it is estimated that more than 120 libraries closed their doors in England, Wales and Scotland. That figure is likely to have increased last year. Thousands of jobs have also been lost, with libraries’ existence more reliant on volunteers than ever before. But closing down a library has to be one of the most short-sighted decisions that public officials can make, with serious consequences for the future of local communities. There is a widespread misconception that the services offered are out-of-date – a relic of a bygone age before youngsters started carrying smartphones in their pockets with instant access to Wikipedia, and before they started downloading books on their Kindle. But a recent study by the Carnegie UK Trust found that people aged 15-24 in England are the most likely age group to use libraries. And nearly half of people aged 25 to 34 still visit them, according to the study. Today, the most successful libraries have remodelled themselves to become fit for the 21st century, and more can follow suit if they receive the right support and advice, and have the backing of governments and councils. I am encouraged by the Scottish Government’s support for adequate library services across Scotland. Tomorrow, the tenth EDGE conference held by Edinburgh City Libraries will be held in the capital, where library experts from across the globe will gather to share good practice and discuss future developments. Everyone attending shares the same belief that libraries offer crucial support to help people help themselves – to support literacy, digital participation, learning, employability, health, culture and leisure. As a former MEP who founded the European Parliament’s All-Party Library group, I’m delighted to be attending this event in my new role as chief executive of Open Knowledge International. As experts in opening up knowledge, we help governments, universities, and civil society organisations reach their full potential by providing them with skills and tools to publish, use, and understand data. Part of our role involves delivering technology solutions which are particularly relevant for libraries. One of our initiatives is called OpenGLAM, a global network that works to open up content and data held by galleries, libraries, archives and museums. All over the world, libraries are coming up with new ideas to make them relevant for the modern age. Take virtual reality as an example, which is arguably the most important innovation since the smartphone. It not only provides a source of fun and entertainment but it has also become a platform to explore science, nature, history, geography and so much more. You no longer have to pick up a book in a library to learn about the Himalayas, the Great Barrier Reef or the Grand Canyon – you can explore them in virtual reality. You can learn by time travelling back to a prehistoric age or go forward into the yet undiscovered possibilities of the future. Virtual technology can also be used to visit places that humans can never travel to other than in the Hollywood world of Ant-Man – deep inside the body to a cellular level for example. And technology can be used to examine the impact of humankind on our natural world, particularly the consequences of climate change. I have long championed the importance of coding as part of the education curriculum, especially given that Scotland is home to more than 100,000 digital tech economy jobs. But while there remains a shortfall in what is delivered in our schools, libraries can fill that gap. Our world is moulded in code, and libraries offer young people an opportunity to bring ideas to life and build things that will bring joy to millions. So by embracing the future, they can continue to be an unrivalled place of learning, like they always were for previous generations. But libraries are much more than just places to learn. They are part of the fabric of a local community. At the EDGE conference we will hear from Henrik Jochumsen of the University of Copenhagen about the Danish ‘three-function model’ for libraries: as a place, as a space and as relations. Libraries can serve as a catalyst for change and urban development and build new creative partnerships in towns and cities, which in turn create vibrant, liveable and coherent communities. We will also hear about the Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina, which has transformed into a ‘studio’ – meaning a meeting room with four walls can be a computer lab, storytime room, homework centre, book club, stage and theatre, all in one day. Last year, Liverpool Central Library was named the Bookseller’s Library of the Year in the UK. Its success, which has resulted in a steady increase in customers, stems from the decision to make the building part of the community, with events where people create art projects, and late-night openings until midnight. And being part of the community means providing a service to every single member of that community. While some people in society become ever more marginalised, there is a job to be done to ensure that digital library services are more inclusive to all, including people with disabilities. And as more people live into old age, libraries can play vital role as a dementia friendly space. They also provide an important resource for migrant families to develop their reading skills with access to dual language titles. Public libraries have been at the heart of our communities for decades, and I dearly hope that continues for decades to come. And with technological advancements, they can become more useful than ever before. But their success is also dependent on those in a position of power recognising their worth.