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Open Knowledge Festival 2019 planning kickoff Thu 22.10.

- November 9, 2018 in Events, OK Festival

Welcome to join us for the Open Knowledge Festival 2019 kickoff at Maria 01, door 5E, room Nudist on Thu 22.10. 17-18:30! Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/870128053377047/ Finland hosted the Open Knowledge Festival back in 2012 and it was one of the igniting moments from Open Knowledge Finland. The event featured talks, tracks and workshops on a diverse range of issues related to openness such as Open Data, Open GLAM, Open Democracy, Open GIS to name just a few. Since our good friends at the MyData conference decided to go global with it’s own organization this year perhaps 2019 might be the year we highlight the other cool stuff related to openness that is in the works and bubbling under to reinvent what Open Knowledge and Open Knowledge Finland is all about. The conference is just an idea now but let’s explore what we’d like to make out of it! Join the #okfest2019 channel on the Open Knowledge Finland Slack to continue the discussion: https://okfi.slack.com/messages/CE1APPXE2/ In case you’re not yet on the OKFI Slack, you can get an invite here: https://okfi-slack.herokuapp.com/ The post Open Knowledge Festival 2019 planning kickoff Thu 22.10. appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Collective Intelligence: Solving Problems at Scale 23.10.2018

- October 22, 2018 in Events, Featured, ResponsiveOrg Finland

Tuesday 23.10.2018 16:30-18:30 Maria 01/Classroom: https://www.facebook.com/events/321675121922917/
Professor Thomas Malone from MIT, author of the book Superminds – The Suprising Power of People and Computers Thinking Together, defines Collective Intelligence as “the result of groups of individuals acting together in ways that seem intelligent.”
Collective Intelligence is nothing new. In nature we see superorganisms like ant colonies that are able to coordinate their collective efforts without centralized overview. Humanity has developed their own models of Collective Intelligence that have, according to Malone, taken for example the forms of hiearchies, democracies, markets, collectives and ecosystems. However, with the rise of connected technologies based on the Internet, data, AI, IoT and Blockchains to start with, the issue of creating new forms of Collective Intelligence has risen. As Thomas Malone puts it:
“How can people and computers be connected so that—collectively—they act more intelligently than any person, group, or computer has ever done before?”
We are starting to have very diverse examples of this phenomenon ranging from Open Source communities, Amazon’s Mechanical Turk that organizes crowds to work on repetitive tasks, Google’s search engine which uses AI and clicks done by humans to prioritize search results and the largest encyclopedia ever made in Wikipedia. But what we don’t have yet is a general understanding on what makes people and machines work together in the best possible ways and how to harness that knowledge to solving problems at scale. I was privileged to be invited to and participate in Nesta’s event Designing collective intelligence – Mobilising humans and machines to address social needs which sought to bring together the community of people working around the topic. You can check out the presentation materials here:
How might we promote the advancement of Collective Intelligence here in Finland?

This is the topic of our Collective Intelligence – Solving Problems at Scale event. You’re welcome to join in on Tuesday 23.10.2018 16:30-18:30 at Maria 01/Classroom. Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/321675121922917/ You might have stumbled into a competition where people are asked to guess the amount of candy in a large jar. Mysteriously, the average of all the people guessing turns out to be pretty close. You’ve heard the old phrase: the smartest person in the room is the room. On the other hand, computers beat humans in simple, repetitive tasks at scale but humans tend to be more creative. What a combination it would be if we had the ability to harness crowds and operate both at scale and in a creative manner? Nowadays drones are used in humanitarian crises such as hurricane relief to help with mapping areas in need of human assistance. A global, internet-enabled network of digital humanitarians is then used to do analysis of the footage to help with coordination efforts. What if we could create organizations that were able to describe the tasks that need to be done to fulfil a purpose and distribute those tasks to a global network of freelancers that never sleeps? Welcome to an evening of an intro into Collective Intelligence: Solving Problems at Scale hosted by Open Knowledge Finland’s Mikael Seppälä. Learn what it is and discuss where we might see the first examples of it in Finland. Collective Intelligence is one of those rising multidisciplinary approaches that seeks to utilize different types of crowds, machines and enable collaboration that far exceeds the forms of collaboration we see today. You can be a social scientist, a facilitator, a designer, a data scientist or just someone interested in budding forms of collaboration. Sources: Geoff Mulgan: Big Mind: How Collective Intelligence Can Change Our World Nesta: Designing collective intelligence – Mobilising humans and machines to address social needs (event) SAGE Publication’s new journal on Collective Intelligence Collective Intelligence 2018: From Open Knowledge and Network Organizations to Technology-enabled Intelligence Tietoasiantuntija 2-3/2018: Inhimillisyyden ja teknologian liitto johdattaa työn uudelle aikakaudelle The post Collective Intelligence: Solving Problems at Scale 23.10.2018 appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Enlivening the Community at Open Knowledge Finland Retreat 2018

- October 19, 2018 in blog, Events

A merry gang of 17 people got together on 12-13.10.2018 for our annual Open Knowledge Finland 24h retreat at Kisakeskus near Raasepori, about 90 km from Helsinki. The weekend featured talks, good food including Tapola’s black sausage, booze an evening at the sauna where Mika lost his glasses and a bunch of bonding. Art of Hosting: Circles for Participatory sensemaking and Open Space Since some of our members had participated in a Art of Hosting event during the summer that many others were also interested in, we decided to try out some of the methods during our retreat. We set up our chairs in a circle for participatory sensing and governance about our general experiences, consent-based decision-making for taking everybody into account and Open Space Technology to host open discussions on the topics that people are interested in. Even though openness has been a core value for Open Knowledge Finland since it’s beginning in 2012, we are still just beginning to learn the self-management methods that might support us support being diverse in opinions, inclusive in accepting the variance and simultaneously be efficient enough in moving forward. It’s not only about using the methods but also about growing together with a shared mindset, which is difficult in our decentralized organization that is based on mostly fleeting meetings with each other. Discussion topics OKRs – Objectives and Key Results What is Open Knowledge Finland? A mapping exercise We have so many things going on in Open Knowledge Finland that it’s hard for any of us, and especially newcomers, to get a good idea of who we are. We did a quick exercise in mapping some of our communities that can generally be divided into two categories: the Open Knowledge folks and those focusing on Open Collaboration. You can see our result here: Strategy Communications & Marketing What is Teal? ResponsiveOrg/Participatory Team Practices On Saturday we looked into the Open Collaboration practices (they can be seen here: http://okf.fi/opencollab) that we’re exploring in Open Knowledge Finland. We have introduced just a few of them and are looking to try out some new ones. We don’t really have a process for introducing them and they are not actively in use everywhere. One of the new ones we started discussing is organizing in circles and a “Talkootarjotin”, exposing microtasks to volunteers. Starting a Circle for Website Renewal & Talkootarjotin We decided to discuss organizing in circles and the Talkootarjotin in a separate session. We started discussing how we might start a circle for the renewal of our website. We decided to look into Sociocracy 3.0 patterns on Defining Agreements (https://patterns.sociocracy30.org/defining-agreements.html) to explore how we might use participatory circles to organize in both static and temporary ways. Here’s what a Website Circle might look like: We also ended up ideating and creating a new community of Open Knowledge Allies to participate by volunteering to help us with microtasks. You can read about it here: https://fi.okfn.org/open-knowledge-allies-lets-get-sht-done/ General Feelings on the Weekend We had new people initiated into eating the Finnish delicacy, Tapola’s black sausage: Jelena got inspired to write poetry that included Mika’s lost glasses: Ansku & Zizi “found” some footage in which the crew gets latino: Key takeaways from a newcomer’s perspective Attended 4 open sessions in total, Open Knowledge / OKFI in a nutshell Going back into the basic question of what, why and how of OK/OKFI has taught me about the fundamental principles of OK as a whole and its impact to the community. Learned about the difference between workgroups and projects which I assumed to be of similar in function prior to participating the session. Gained insights about the various domain-specific groups (workgroups) and how each groups are interwoven around the OK sphere. Open collaboration in OKFI Learned about how OKFI is selecting, testing and applying different methodologies when collaborating with others in areas such as, project development, brainstorming, workshops and etc. Some open colab practices were even used during the retreat such as, circles and Consent over Consensus OKRs Learned on how to evaluate and set realistic / achievable and actionable goals (objectives) and how or steps to achieve it and measured. Circles It was amazing to witnessed how the session started from looking into the theoretical side of circles and immediately applying it into practical means, in this case for website revamped circle. This was my first time to participate in a retreat that has utilized open space sessions and in my opinion it turned out be a success. The culture of openness and respectfulness was also observed throughout the retreat, where everyone was given a chance to speak and to be heard. Overall, the OKFI one day retreat was an invaluable experience for me, lots of learning, amazing people and awesome sauna session. How to Participate Next? Join Open Knowledge Allies & let’s get sh*t done! Want to contribute your time to the purpose of creating a fair and open digital society by means of Open Knowledge and Open Collaboration? We have a bunch of initiatives, tasks and roles we might need YOUR help with. Join Open Knowledge Allies to help us out and collaborate with us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/okallies Join the Open Knowledge Finland Slack for the discussion, you can get an invite here: https://okfi-slack.herokuapp.com/ And join the #OKAllies channel: https://okfi.slack.com/messages/CDEKT7M55/ The post Enlivening the Community at Open Knowledge Finland Retreat 2018 appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

IODC 2018: The hard questions for the future of open data

- September 24, 2018 in Events, Featured, IODC, iodc18

The latest edition of  the International Open Data Conference (IODC) is just around the bend. We’ll be discussing open data during the entire week in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Through a series of pre-events, including symposiums, discussion panels and workshops as well as the main conference, we will discuss with open data practitioners, advocates, and researchers about the future of open data. This type of conference is important since it allows us to engage with people in different contexts, who may think differently from us and it allows us to learn  through all the discussions.

Our hope: being constructively critical and don’t fear to talk about what does not work

There are some questions like, who does open data work for? Is it really for “everyone”? And if it is not, how do we serve people who are not necessarily interested in open data data but could benefit from it? These questions are not new – in fact some have been around from the very beginning of open data. In order to advance we want to discuss if those are indeed the right questions. We acknowledge that there may be many views about this. As an example, some may think of the ‘open’ in open data as just a mechanism of sharing data. To us, open is much more than that: ‘open’ is a key value of the societies that we strive for, while being balanced appropriately with concerns around privacy and security.  We will grasp the opportunity of having these great minds in one place and gather different voices from the open data space present at the conference. We will start asking some of the uncomfortable questions that will let us know if open data is actually heading into the future – or are we doing business as usual since 2008? Do we frame and think about societal problems in the right way? Has discourse around empowerment, transparency, accountability run out of steam? Must the political side of open data (fiscal transparency) become ‘more political’? We suggest questions that are not straight-forward to answer. We acknowledge this and want to gather the variety of points of view before drawing conclusions.

Where we from Open Knowledge International will be

Open Knowledge International is represented at IODC by Sander van der Waal (@sandervdwaal), Danny Lammerhirt (@danlammerhirt) and Oscar Montiel (@tlacoyodefrijol). We want to join the discussions about the future of open data, engaging in the following debates (among others): From our point of view, these spaces will start addressing some of the larger questions of the open data space. We feel like these debates are critical in their approach to the discourse of openness. It is crucial that look beyond open data for data’s sake, overlooking the political issues of this work. We will also be helping facilitate workshops and present about our work on Fiscal Transparency, School of Data and Frictionless Data. Join us at the Open Contracting in Practice workshop on Tuesday morning, the refresh of the Open Data Principles workshop on Tuesday afternoon,  and the Data Standards Day on Wednesday. So, if you’re in Buenos Aires as well we look forward to hearing from you; please come find us and discuss these questions! Or attend one of our sessions. If you’re not attending, please reach out on Twitter to @okfn or to one of us directly.  

Open Summer of Code is growing beyond the Belgian borders!

- August 2, 2018 in belgium, Events, network, OK Belgium, open Summer of code

Authors: Dries van Ransbeek and David Chaves To some of you, Open Summer of Code – also known as osoc – is a name that rings a bell, to others this is a new concept. So, for the latter group: osoc is an originally Belgian summer programme organised by Open Knowledge Belgium which has been around since 2011. Ever since that first summer, osoc has been breathing life into 62 open innovation projects.

More open innovation than ever before

Open Summer of Code is an annual summer programme. Several teams of students have four weeks to give shape to real-life open innovation projects. This July, Open Summer of Code welcomed 74 students who got paid to work on 17 open innovation projects as summer job: a record in osoc’s history. To make this happen, Open Summer of Code partners up with external partners: two examples of this edition were, amongst others, Informatie Vlaanderen and Brussels Mobility. This summer, the 8th edition took place. 17 projects were developed, start to finish, in just one month. Every team consisted of driven multi-disciplinary students and coaches who brainstormed, coded and tested out their applications together. The fruits of their labour were presented at the Demo Day on the 26th of July in Brussels with more than 300 attendees. Find an overview of all osoc18’s projects here: http://2018.summerofcode.be/2018.

Open innovation with Open Source and Open Data

Open Summer of Code builds open source applications based on open data, which is data that can be freely (re)used and can be distributed by everyone. Open data has many different uses and brings about innovation time and again. Every single one of the 17 projects benefits our society as a whole. Toon Vanagt, chairman of Open Knowledge Belgium explains: “At osoc, we aim to illustrate the advantages of open data with clear applications in addition to giving an enriching learning experience to motivated students. We pass on the result of that effort to society transparently through open source. Our students work on these innovation projects in small teams and with a deadline. The goal of osoc is to deliver as much functionality as possible at the end of the month. To reach this goal, the teams are supported by experienced coaches. This year, we can count on the support of 24 partners from both government and business sector. In return for their contribution, they submit projects themselves that can be further developed after Open Summer of Code”.

Open Summer of Code goes international

For the first time, this year, osoc turned as international with a parallel event in Spain. A collaboration between the Open Knowledge Belgium and the Ontology Engineering Group (from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid) made possible that during two weeks in July, 8 international students developed 3 innovation projects in the city of Madrid. The three partners for this 1st edition of osoc in Spain were: the innovation department of the pharmaceutical company Lilly, the astronomical observatory of the UPM and the EU project CEF-OASIS. The whole program was celebrated with the support of the open laboratory for innovation project of the Madrid’s council, Medialab-Prado, and similar to the Belgium edition, the outcomes of the project were presented during the Demo Day on the 20th of July with more than 30 external attendees.

What’s next? osoc19 in multiple countries

With its first international edition, Open Summer of Code has put its first steps towards its goal to pursue more international impact. In 2019, it aims to have students making open innovation projects happen across multiple countries. Therefore, it’s looking for local Open Knowledge chapters or other partner organizations who want to take the lead in their country. As Open Knowledge Belgium has 8 years of experience within its team with organizing Open Summer of Code, feel free to drop an email to dries@openknowledge.be to get started and receive more information about setting up your local summer programme. Happy summer of open innovation!

More information about Open Summer of Code and this year’s projects:

Closing feedback loops for more & better open data in Switzerland

- July 10, 2018 in Events, OK Switzerland, Open Data, Switzerland

Last week, the annual open data conference in Switzerland took place in St. Gallen. In this post, Oleg Lavrovsky, activist for Open Knowledge and board member of the Swiss Chapter, shares a look back at the event showcasing the latest developments in the country, with results of the first Open Data Student Awards. For more coverage, photos and links visit Opendata.ch/2018. The #opendatach conference is, for the dedicated, a 24 hour event – starting this year around 6pm on Monday, when Rufus Pollock joined us in Zürich, lasting until 6pm on Tuesday July 3, as a light apéro and quick clean-up closed the doors on the eighth annual gathering of the Swiss Open Knowledge community. A group of organizers and core contributors spent a balmy afternoon perched in the loft at the Impact Hub, debating the state of the nation – which a recent ch.okfn.org blog post recounts – reviewing the recommendations of our Task Force, distributing and discussing the new book. A short night later we were on an early train with Hannes Gassert, checking waypoints over cups of green tea. Finally we arrive on site in St.Gallen, the economic and political center of eastern Switzerland, and host to a modern, internationally renowned University – whose main building was rapidly transformed into our favourite habitat: a burgeoning centre for activism, critical thought and debate.
After quickly saying hello we set to work on setting up the rooms, dodging streams of students rushing to class. In one hacky corner of the event, an unconference showcase sponsored by the local IT community featured 9 projects, submitted through an online platform (hack.opendata.ch), and whose team members were attending the conference. A colorful showcase wall, next to the entrance to the main room where keynotes took place, engendered imaginative discussion, giving participants a chance to find and meet the makers of innovative projects made with open data.

Photo credit: Ernie Deane, CC BY-SA 3.0

You’ll find excellent coverage of the morning’s plenary sessions in the Netzwoche article, highlighting the readiness which our host city St. Gallen demonstrated to support open government data (OGD), sharing a preview of their new open data platform. We learned insights from the cross-border collaboration that has taken place over the past years between the OGD administrations of the cities of St. Gallen and Vienna. Balancing out the mood in the room, we got to hear compelling remarks from a project leader who has so far been frustrated in his attempts to gain funding and political support for his open political data initiative:
“The biggest problem, however, is not the lack of access to data or lack of know-how among those involved. The parliamentary services now provide a good API, so that linking and interpreting various data is feasible. What is lacking above all is sustainability, and in particular sustainable financing.” –Daniel Black, smartmonitor

Keynotes

In the keynote by André Golliez, his upcoming departure from the role as president of Opendata.ch was announced, and he shared his vision for the recently founded Swiss Data Alliance. In this, he strives to make open data a key component of data policy and data infrastructure development in Swiss government and industry. Looking back on how open data has fared in politics since Barack Obama, he expressed worries about the pendulum turning in another direction, and encouraged us not to take things for granted. Hitting closer to home, André spoke about the right to data portability, specifically mentioning revisions to the Swiss Data Protection Act which follow the EU’s GDPR – encouraging our community to get involved in the debate and political process. In our final – much anticipated – morning keynote, Rufus Pollock came on stage to share his renewed vision for openness activism, introducing the main ideas from his new book, The Open Revolution, which he was selling and signing in the conference hall. In Switzerland, we have been keeping close track on developments in the open knowledge movement, influencing our own ongoing organizational transformation as a new generation of activists, policymakers, data wranglers push the project forward. The ideas within the book have been a cause of ceaseless debate for the weeks before the conference, and will surely continue through the summer. Some people complain about seeing the relevance, and we have been enjoying the ensuing debate. Even if Rufus did not manage to convince everyone in the room – if the language barrier, stories from foreign shores, or his radical-common-sense philosophy fail to attract immediate policy or media attention (NB: we eagerly await publication of an interview in the next issue of Das Magazin – follow @tagi_magi), they are certainly leaving a deep impression on our community. 105 copies of the new book distributed at name-your-price along with free digital downloads have put a progressive, challenging text into able hands, and the bold ideas within are helping to reignite and refresh our personal and collective commitment to activism for a fair and sustainable information society.

The workshops

After lunch, we hosted six afternoon workshop tracks (Open Data Startups, Open Smart Cities, Open Data in Science, Linked Open Data, Open Mobility Data, and Blockchain for Open Data), which you can read about, and download presentations from (as well as those of the keynotes), on the conference website. I made a short presentation on Frictionless Data (slides here) in the Science track, which showcased four projects working with, or fostering the development and use of, open data for scientific purposes – and will elaborate a little bit on this workshop here. Marcel Salathé, our workshop lead and a founder of the open foodrepo.org initiative, demonstrated the open data science challenge platform crowdAI developed at EPFL, which connects data science experts and enthusiasts with open data to solve specific problems, through challenges. My talk was about containerization formats for open data, introducing Frictionless Data – which addresses this issue through simple specifications and software – and my work on supporting these standards in the Julia language. Donat Agosti spoke about Plazi, addressing the need of transforming scientific data from publications, books, and other unstructured formats into a persistent and openly accessible digital taxonomic literature. Finally, Rok Roškar introduced the Swiss Data Science Center and its Renku platform, a highly scalable & secure open software platform designed to foster multidisciplinary data (science) collaborations. It was a privilege to take part, and I appreciated the learnings shared and eager discussions. The question came up of how many standardization initiatives it really takes, as well as whether and how improvements to the platform for data sharing really address the fundamental issues in science, and how the open data community can help improve access to high quality experimental data, reproducibility, and collaboration. We are following up on some of these questions already.

Open Data Student Award

And then it was, finally, time to hand over the Open Data Student Award, a project that took months of preparation, three days of 3D printing, hours of nail-bitingly intense jury duty, and only 15 minutes allowed to sum it all up. The jury team – consisting of Prof. Stefan Keller (CH Open), Andreas Amsler (OGD Canton of Zürich) and myself (Opendata.ch) – were impressed with the projects, each truly exemplary.
Every student and supervisor participating this year deserves recognition for making an effort to use, re-publish and to promote open data. In addition to being put on the big screen at the annual conference in St. Gallen and discussed by all the people gathered there, the projects are being given extra attention through community channels.

Congratulations to Jonas Oesch from FHNW Windisch, whose winning project The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Swiss Open Government Data educates readers in an exemplary way about open data, applying open source technical ingenuity and skillful design to a problem that is critical to the open data community.
The open data community is looking for answers to the question of how to better represent the diversity of datasets, putting them into new clothes, so to speak. The hitchhiker’s guide to Swiss Open Government Data is a project that points the way in such a direction.
Details about all the projects can be found on the official announcement. Additionally, we have shared some background and sources of the award open source for you to peruse. We are happy to get feedback and to hear your ideas for where to take the un/conference and award next year! Just drop us a line in the Open Knowledge Switzerland forum.

Wrapping up

As the football match got going that would eventually see our country rather unconvincingly exit the World Cup, we gave the floor to the people doing much of the day-to-day leg work to convince and support data providers to open up their troves to the Swiss public. Jean-Luc Cochard and Andreas Kellerhalls from the Swiss Federal Archives took turns to recap the situation in Switzerland. The OGD strategy for 2019-2023 is being prepared in the Federal Department of Home Affairs, to be ratified by stakeholder departments over the summer. Our association will make a position statement with and on behalf of the user community in the coming months. The presentations demonstrated both a continued commitment to public service, as well as an admission of where we are coming short, an analysis of some of the many roadblocks and challenges technical, political and cultural, that are part of the strategy review. The next 4 years promise renewal, responsibility, and many lessons to apply across the board.

Photo credit: Ernie Deane, CC BY-SA 3.0

We know that not all the actors on the OGD stage are doing a great job, yet – and that to improve the status quo, we need to continue improving awareness and knowledge of the issues. Our role in facilitating cooperation across the digital divide and improving data literacy in Switzerland will be an important stepping stone to future success. Pointing the way to such opportunities was the final keynote of the day, from Walter Palmetshofer (@vavoida), who joined us for the whole 24 hour marathon, and helped to end our conference with a bright acknowledgement of public interest: in good sportsmanship, international cooperation, and sustainable projects to build THINGS THAT MATTER. Walter shared with us the most interesting results, learnings and statistics from the first highly successful years of the Open Data Incubator Europe (ODINE), and let us take home tantalizing glimpses into 57 inspiring startups – each of which could well be at home in Switzerland, to each of which we should be keen to open data, open doors, and learn from.

Suomi digitaalisten henkilötietojen edelläkävijäksi – maailman johtavat asiantuntijat Helsingissä elokuussa

- July 4, 2018 in data protection, Events, Featured, human-centered approach, My Data, mydata, omadata, personal-data, privacy

Palvelujen digitalisoituminen on synnyttänyt kasvavan määrän henkilötietojen kertymistä eri palveluntarjoajille. Samaan aikaan kuluttajien luottamus henkilötietojen asialliseen käyttöön on heikentynyt.

Suomalaiset asiantuntijat, aktivistit ja yritykset ovat eturintamassa kehittämässä tulevaisuuden mallia digitaalisten henkilötietojen hallintaan. Tavoitteena on rakentaa maailmanlaajuinen toimintamalli, jossa yksilö voi itse määritellä millaisin ehdoin hänen tietojaan käytetään. Reilu datatalous hyödyttää kaikkia ja avaa uusia mahdollisuuksia eettisesti kestävään liiketoimintaan.

Liikenne- ja viestintäministeriön tänään julkaisema raportti (https://www.lvm.fi/-/suomi-toimii-omadata-mallin-suunnannayttajana-980281), Sitran IHANⓇ-hanke ja elokuussa Helsingin Kulttuuritalolla järjestettävä MyData 2018 -konferenssi vievät maailmanlaajuisten yhteisten pelisääntöjen kehittämistä aimo harppauksen eteenpäin.

”Toukokuussa 2018 voimaan astunut EU:n tietosuoja-asetus GDPR on merkittävä askel oikeaan suuntaan. Tämä asetus ei kuitenkaan yksin riitä takaamaan oikeudenmukaista tietoyhteiskuntaa tai ruokkimaan innovatiivista liiketoimintaa ja teknologiaa. Tarvitsemme uusia käytäntöjä ja työkaluja, joilla oikeudet toteutetaan käytännössä. Siksi tarvitsemme MyDataa”, selittää raportin toimittanut Antti Poikola, Aalto-yliopiston tutkija ja yksi kansainvälisen MyData-verkoston perustajista.

MyData on 2010-luvulla syntynyt kansainvälinen ilmiö, uudenlainen ajattelumalli ja tulevaisuuden kuva. Tämän päivän päätöksillä on suuri vaikutus siihen, syntyykö oman datan jakamiseen ja hallintaan yhteisiä standardeja kuten aiemmin rahansiirtoihin pankkien välillä, matkapuheluihin tai sähköpostiin, vai jatkuuko muutaman jätin valta datamarkkinoilla.

MyData 2018 konferenssi pureutuu tietosuoja-asetuksen vaikutuksiin ja tuo alan pioneerit ja teknologiajätit Suomeen

Tietosuoja-asetuksen vaikutuksia yrityksille ja kansalaisille punnitaan elokuussa, kun kolmatta kertaa järjestettävä MyData-konferenssi tuo henkilötiedon ammattilaiset ympäri maailmaa Helsinkiin. Esiintyjäkaartiin kuuluu yli sata kotimaista ja kansainvälistä huippuasiantuntijaa mm. Googlelta, BBC:ltä ja F-Securelta.

”Konferenssiin saapuu arviolta 800 henkilöä yli 30 maasta. Mukana on liike-elämän johtajia, yrittäjiä, teknologian kehittäjiä, juristeja, yhteiskuntatieteilijöitä ja aktivisteja. Keskustelujen aiheina ovat uusi liiketoiminta, tekoälyn ja henkilötiedon etiikka, tietojärjestelmien yhteentoimivuus sekä henkilötiedon yhteiskunnalliset vaikutukset”, kuvailee MyData-konferenssin projektijohtaja Viivi Lähteenoja.

Kulttuuritalolla 29.-31.8.2018 järjestettävän konferenssin pääkumppani on Suomen itsenäisyyden juhlarahasto Sitra. Konferenssin järjestävät Open Knowledge Finland ry ja Aalto yliopisto yhteistyössä ranskalaisen ajatuspajan Fingin kanssa. www.mydata2018.org

Lisätietoja:

Antti ‘Jogi’ Poikola
Ohjelmapäällikkö, MyData 2018
Aalto-yliopisto
jogi@mydata.org +358 44 337 5439
 
Riikka Kämppi
Viestintäpäällikkö, MyData 2018
riikka@mydata.org
+358 40 5729733

www.mydata2018.org

MyData-konferenssi järjestetään kolmatta kertaa 29.-31.8.2018 Helsingin Kulttuuritalolla. Konferenssi on maailmanlaajuisen MyData-verkoston lippulaivatapahtuma, joka kokoaa monialaisen yleisön oppimaan toisiltaan ja rakentamaan toimivaa datataloutta ja reilua tietoyhteiskuntaa.

Open Knowledge Finland ry on vuonna 2012 perustettu yhteisölähtöinen, voittoa tavoittelematon kansalaisjärjestö, joka toimii osana kansainvälistä Open Knowledge -verkostoa. Yhdistys edistää tiedon avoimuutta, avoimen tiedon hyödyntämistä ja avoimen yhteiskunnan kehittymistä.

Aalto-yliopisto on monitieteinen yhteisö, jossa tiede ja taide kohtaavat tekniikan ja talouden.

Fing on riippumaton ranskalainen voittoa tavoittelematon tutkimusorganisaatio, joka löytää, luo ja jakaa uusia ja käytännöllisiä ideoita, jotka ennakoivat digitaalisia muutoksia.

The post Suomi digitaalisten henkilötietojen edelläkävijäksi – maailman johtavat asiantuntijat Helsingissä elokuussa appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Suomi digitaalisten henkilötietojen edelläkävijäksi – maailman johtavat asiantuntijat Helsingissä elokuussa

- July 4, 2018 in data protection, Events, Featured, human-centered approach, My Data, mydata, omadata, personal-data, privacy

Palvelujen digitalisoituminen on synnyttänyt kasvavan määrän henkilötietojen kertymistä eri palveluntarjoajille. Samaan aikaan kuluttajien luottamus henkilötietojen asialliseen käyttöön on heikentynyt.

Suomalaiset asiantuntijat, aktivistit ja yritykset ovat eturintamassa kehittämässä tulevaisuuden mallia digitaalisten henkilötietojen hallintaan. Tavoitteena on rakentaa maailmanlaajuinen toimintamalli, jossa yksilö voi itse määritellä millaisin ehdoin hänen tietojaan käytetään. Reilu datatalous hyödyttää kaikkia ja avaa uusia mahdollisuuksia eettisesti kestävään liiketoimintaan.

Liikenne- ja viestintäministeriön tänään julkaisema raportti (https://www.lvm.fi/-/suomi-toimii-omadata-mallin-suunnannayttajana-980281), Sitran IHANⓇ-hanke ja elokuussa Helsingin Kulttuuritalolla järjestettävä MyData 2018 -konferenssi vievät maailmanlaajuisten yhteisten pelisääntöjen kehittämistä aimo harppauksen eteenpäin.

”Toukokuussa 2018 voimaan astunut EU:n tietosuoja-asetus GDPR on merkittävä askel oikeaan suuntaan. Tämä asetus ei kuitenkaan yksin riitä takaamaan oikeudenmukaista tietoyhteiskuntaa tai ruokkimaan innovatiivista liiketoimintaa ja teknologiaa. Tarvitsemme uusia käytäntöjä ja työkaluja, joilla oikeudet toteutetaan käytännössä. Siksi tarvitsemme MyDataa”, selittää raportin toimittanut Antti Poikola, Aalto-yliopiston tutkija ja yksi kansainvälisen MyData-verkoston perustajista.

MyData on 2010-luvulla syntynyt kansainvälinen ilmiö, uudenlainen ajattelumalli ja tulevaisuuden kuva. Tämän päivän päätöksillä on suuri vaikutus siihen, syntyykö oman datan jakamiseen ja hallintaan yhteisiä standardeja kuten aiemmin rahansiirtoihin pankkien välillä, matkapuheluihin tai sähköpostiin, vai jatkuuko muutaman jätin valta datamarkkinoilla.

MyData 2018 konferenssi pureutuu tietosuoja-asetuksen vaikutuksiin ja tuo alan pioneerit ja teknologiajätit Suomeen

Tietosuoja-asetuksen vaikutuksia yrityksille ja kansalaisille punnitaan elokuussa, kun kolmatta kertaa järjestettävä MyData-konferenssi tuo henkilötiedon ammattilaiset ympäri maailmaa Helsinkiin. Esiintyjäkaartiin kuuluu yli sata kotimaista ja kansainvälistä huippuasiantuntijaa mm. Googlelta, BBC:ltä ja F-Securelta.

”Konferenssiin saapuu arviolta 800 henkilöä yli 30 maasta. Mukana on liike-elämän johtajia, yrittäjiä, teknologian kehittäjiä, juristeja, yhteiskuntatieteilijöitä ja aktivisteja. Keskustelujen aiheina ovat uusi liiketoiminta, tekoälyn ja henkilötiedon etiikka, tietojärjestelmien yhteentoimivuus sekä henkilötiedon yhteiskunnalliset vaikutukset”, kuvailee MyData-konferenssin projektijohtaja Viivi Lähteenoja.

Kulttuuritalolla 29.-31.8.2018 järjestettävän konferenssin pääkumppani on Suomen itsenäisyyden juhlarahasto Sitra. Konferenssin järjestävät Open Knowledge Finland ry ja Aalto yliopisto yhteistyössä ranskalaisen ajatuspajan Fingin kanssa. www.mydata2018.org

Lisätietoja:

Antti ‘Jogi’ Poikola
Ohjelmapäällikkö, MyData 2018
Aalto-yliopisto
jogi@mydata.org +358 44 337 5439
 
Riikka Kämppi
Viestintäpäällikkö, MyData 2018
riikka@mydata.org
+358 40 5729733

www.mydata2018.org

MyData-konferenssi järjestetään kolmatta kertaa 29.-31.8.2018 Helsingin Kulttuuritalolla. Konferenssi on maailmanlaajuisen MyData-verkoston lippulaivatapahtuma, joka kokoaa monialaisen yleisön oppimaan toisiltaan ja rakentamaan toimivaa datataloutta ja reilua tietoyhteiskuntaa.

Open Knowledge Finland ry on vuonna 2012 perustettu yhteisölähtöinen, voittoa tavoittelematon kansalaisjärjestö, joka toimii osana kansainvälistä Open Knowledge -verkostoa. Yhdistys edistää tiedon avoimuutta, avoimen tiedon hyödyntämistä ja avoimen yhteiskunnan kehittymistä.

Aalto-yliopisto on monitieteinen yhteisö, jossa tiede ja taide kohtaavat tekniikan ja talouden.

Fing on riippumaton ranskalainen voittoa tavoittelematon tutkimusorganisaatio, joka löytää, luo ja jakaa uusia ja käytännöllisiä ideoita, jotka ennakoivat digitaalisia muutoksia.

The post Suomi digitaalisten henkilötietojen edelläkävijäksi – maailman johtavat asiantuntijat Helsingissä elokuussa appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

CKANconUS and Code for America Summit: some thoughts about the important questions

- June 20, 2018 in ckan, code for america, Events, OK US, USA

It’s been a few weeks after CKANConUS and the seventh Code for America Summit took place in Oakland. As always, it was a great place to meet old friends and new faces of technologists, policy experts, government innovators in the U.S. In this blogpost I share some of the experience of attending these two conferences and a few thoughts I’ve been ruminating about the discussions that happened, and more importantly, those that didn’t happen. CKAN is an open source open data portal platform that Open Knowledge International developed several years ago. It has been used and reused by many governments and civil society organizations around the world. For CKANconUS, the OK US group, led by Joel Natividad organized a one day event with different users and implementers of CKAN around the United States. We had the California based LA Counts, gathering data from the 88 cities in the County of Los Angeles; the California Data Collaborative working to improve water management decisions. We also had some interesting presentations from the GreenInfo Network and the California Natural Resources Agency. And we had the chance to hear about the awesome process of the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center to choose CKAN as its platform and how they maintain the project (presentation included LEGOs in every slide). On the more technical side, David Read, Ian Ward and our own Adrià Mercader talked about the new versions of CKAN, the Express Loader and the Technical Roadmap for CKAN, 11 years after its development started. You can view the slides by Adrià Mercader on the CKAN Technical Roadmap overview here. We closed with some great lightning talks about datamirror.org to ensure access to federal research data and Human Centered Design and what Amanda Damewood learned about working in government in improving these processes. The next two days in the Code for America Summit were full of interesting talks about building tools, innovating in our processes and making government work for people in a better way. There were some interesting keynote speakers as well as breakout sessions where we discussed the process to build certain projects and how we can rethink how we engage in our communities. I would like highlight two mainstage talks about collaboration (or the difficulty of such) between government and civil society. The first is a talk and panel about disasters in Puerto Rico, Houston and cities in Florida, where some key points were raised about the importance of having accurate, verifiable and usable information in these cases, as well as the importance of having a network of people who are willing to help their peers. The second is the presentation Code for Asheville presented, regarding their issues with homelessness and police data. This isn’t necessarily what you would call a success story but Sabrah n’haRaven made a great point about working with social issues: “Trust effective communities to understand their own problems”. This may sound like a given in the work we do when working with data and building things with it, but it’s something that we need to keep in mind. Using this line of thought, it seems crucial to keep these conversations going. We need to understand our communities, be aware that there are policies that go against the rights of people to live a fulfilling life and we need to change that. I hope for the next CfA Summit and CKANConUS we can try to find some answers to these questions collectively.

CKANconUS and Code for America Summit: some thoughts about the important questions

- June 20, 2018 in ckan, code for america, Events, OK US, USA

It’s been a few weeks after CKANConUS and the seventh Code for America Summit took place in Oakland. As always, it was a great place to meet old friends and new faces of technologists, policy experts, government innovators in the U.S. In this blogpost I share some of the experience of attending these two conferences and a few thoughts I’ve been ruminating about the discussions that happened, and more importantly, those that didn’t happen. CKAN is an open source open data portal platform that Open Knowledge International developed several years ago. It has been used and reused by many governments and civil society organizations around the world. For CKANconUS, the OK US group, led by Joel Natividad organized a one day event with different users and implementers of CKAN around the United States. We had the California based LA Counts, gathering data from the 88 cities in the County of Los Angeles; the California Data Collaborative working to improve water management decisions. We also had some interesting presentations from the GreenInfo Network and the California Natural Resources Agency. And we had the chance to hear about the awesome process of the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center to choose CKAN as its platform and how they maintain the project (presentation included LEGOs in every slide). On the more technical side, David Read, Ian Ward and our own Adrià Mercader talked about the new versions of CKAN, the Express Loader and the Technical Roadmap for CKAN, 11 years after its development started. You can view the slides by Adrià Mercader on the CKAN Technical Roadmap overview here. We closed with some great lightning talks about datamirror.org to ensure access to federal research data and Human Centered Design and what Amanda Damewood learned about working in government in improving these processes. The next two days in the Code for America Summit were full of interesting talks about building tools, innovating in our processes and making government work for people in a better way. There were some interesting keynote speakers as well as breakout sessions where we discussed the process to build certain projects and how we can rethink how we engage in our communities. I would like highlight two mainstage talks about collaboration (or the difficulty of such) between government and civil society. The first is a talk and panel about disasters in Puerto Rico, Houston and cities in Florida, where some key points were raised about the importance of having accurate, verifiable and usable information in these cases, as well as the importance of having a network of people who are willing to help their peers. The second is the presentation Code for Asheville presented, regarding their issues with homelessness and police data. This isn’t necessarily what you would call a success story but Sabrah n’haRaven made a great point about working with social issues: “Trust effective communities to understand their own problems”. This may sound like a given in the work we do when working with data and building things with it, but it’s something that we need to keep in mind. Using this line of thought, it seems crucial to keep these conversations going. We need to understand our communities, be aware that there are policies that go against the rights of people to live a fulfilling life and we need to change that. I hope for the next CfA Summit and CKANConUS we can try to find some answers to these questions collectively.