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OKFestival 2018 becomes Open Knowledge Summit May 2018 in Thessaloniki

Sander van der Waal - November 30, 2017 in Events, Featured, OKFest, OKFest 2018, OKFestival, Open Knowledge Network

It is with regret that due to recent circumstances within Open Knowledge International, we have come to the conclusion that it is necessary to cancel the planned Open Knowledge Festival 2018. This announcement has been a very difficult decision for the team at OKI, however with such a short time frame ahead and a lack of secured funding for the Festival, we felt that we could not guarantee a successful event for all our participants. However, we want to take the opportunity to gather the Open Knowledge Network on the same dates, facilitating an event that embraces our network and is a better fit for where we are today. In this post we outline our alternative plans for Thessaloniki in May 2018.   Dear Network and partners: We are in a period of change at Open Knowledge International. After the resignation of our CEO Pavel Richter we took the time to reflect and think about the state of affairs. We recognise that we have not been as actively communicating as we should have been at Open Knowledge International. There have been some notable successes with initiatives such as Frictionless Data, the School of Data network, Open Data Day and the Global Open Data Index. It is very clear to us that those successes would not have been possible without the passion and commitment of our wider diverse Open Knowledge Network. Similar, if not greater, successes have been achieved by you in the network. Only two of these are the wonderful Prototype Fund project in Germany, and the MyData conference in Finland and Estonia. Full credit for that goes to Open Knowledge Foundation Deutschland and Open Knowledge Finland, only two of the amazing Chapters and groups that make up the Open Knowledge Network. But when we look in the mirror at Open Knowledge International we don’t think that we have excelled in the way that we intended over recent years. We did not communicate clearly to you, our partners, how our organisational strategy was evolving and where we were going as an organisation. We did not engage you, the Open Knowledge Network, on equal footing. We asked for your involvement and contributions at specific points but did not engage you sufficiently on the bigger question of the overall journey we are on together: aiming for juster and more open societies. We are very keen to change this. The world of open knowledge has grown, developed and matured in the last couple of years. Ten years ago we were mostly talking about governments publishing data openly. But now, our collective open knowledge universe includes many other areas like open access to academic publications and open research data. Many groups are actively involved in the area of personal data, where we citizens demand more control over the data we share with corporations on a day-by-day basis. We believe our vision is still very much valid: we still look ahead to a future where everyone has free and open access to key information, enabling every human, citizen, and consumer to understand and shape their lives, homes and the world. Our values are also as relevant as ever: open knowledge, as defined by the open definition, forms the cornerstone of what we do. We value respect and tolerance, collaboration not control. We are pragmatic, not fanatic, we make & talk, and we focus on making change in the world. The Open Knowledge Network is a lot more than just an aggregation of its parts. We know that we must keep these parts in constant relation. And we propose that the best way to do this is to keep the Network linked  through specific domains. This idea builds very much on the concept of Working Groups we have had for many years in the Open Knowledge Network. We have been inspired by the School of Data network who already work in this way – they develop their mission and align strategies between the various organisations that are members of the network – achieving great impact in data literacy in this way. We propose to develop thematic networks within the other domains that are important to multiple Open Knowledge groups. For example, based on a recent survey among Open Knowledge groups we think there is sufficient level of engagement around topics such as Fiscal Transparency, Open Data infrastructure, Open Science, OpenGLAM, and Personal Data. Such a network already exists in the area of data training with the School of Data network. There are opportunities, we believe, to benefit from more dedicated collaboration, exchange of ideas and plans and possibly even develop shared objectives in these areas among Open Knowledge partners. Unfortunately, due to the circumstances at Open Knowledge International, we are not in a position to organise the Open Knowledge Festival we envisioned, and that many of us fondly remember from Berlin (2014) and Helsinki (2012). Not going ahead with the Festival as planned is a very difficult decision for us. However we are keen to ensure that we hold an event that will be successful for the entire Network, taking the opportunity to gather the Open Knowledge Network on the same dates, to do something that is better fitting for where we are today. We are looking forward to bringing our partners together at an Open Knowledge Summit event in Thessaloniki in May 2018 that will help us all collaboratively build the future of the Open Knowledge Network. We will follow up with you, our partners in the Open Knowledge Network, over the next couple of weeks to work together on the idea of the domain networks that we started to outline above. We want to hear from you, if you feel this is the right approach for developing the Open Knowledge Network and incorporate your ideas. Together with you, we want to take the network to the next level in the build-up to May 2018, so that we can all come together in Thessaloniki as an opportunity to meet each other in person and work together within those domains that matter to us. More will follow on this in the next couple of weeks and months. Finally, we want to give a big shout-out to our partners at Open Knowledge Greece. We are very grateful for the hard work that they have put into making the event in Thessaloniki the best it can be, and we look forward to continuing our collaboration with them as amazing hosts for the Open Knowledge Summit.

OKFestival 2018 becomes Open Knowledge Summit May 2018 in Thessaloniki

Sander van der Waal - November 30, 2017 in Events, Featured, OKFest, OKFest 2018, OKFestival, Open Knowledge Network

It is with regret that due to recent circumstances within Open Knowledge International, we have come to the conclusion that it is necessary to cancel the planned Open Knowledge Festival 2018. This announcement has been a very difficult decision for the team at OKI, however with such a short time frame ahead and a lack of secured funding for the Festival, we felt that we could not guarantee a successful event for all our participants. However, we want to take the opportunity to gather the Open Knowledge Network on the same dates, facilitating an event that embraces our network and is a better fit for where we are today. In this post we outline our alternative plans for Thessaloniki in May 2018.   Dear Network and partners: We are in a period of change at Open Knowledge International. After the resignation of our CEO Pavel Richter we took the time to reflect and think about the state of affairs. We recognise that we have not been as actively communicating as we should have been at Open Knowledge International. There have been some notable successes with initiatives such as Frictionless Data, the School of Data network, Open Data Day and the Global Open Data Index. It is very clear to us that those successes would not have been possible without the passion and commitment of our wider diverse Open Knowledge Network. Similar, if not greater, successes have been achieved by you in the network. Only two of these are the wonderful Prototype Fund project in Germany, and the MyData conference in Finland and Estonia. Full credit for that goes to Open Knowledge Foundation Deutschland and Open Knowledge Finland, only two of the amazing Chapters and groups that make up the Open Knowledge Network. But when we look in the mirror at Open Knowledge International we don’t think that we have excelled in the way that we intended over recent years. We did not communicate clearly to you, our partners, how our organisational strategy was evolving and where we were going as an organisation. We did not engage you, the Open Knowledge Network, on equal footing. We asked for your involvement and contributions at specific points but did not engage you sufficiently on the bigger question of the overall journey we are on together: aiming for juster and more open societies. We are very keen to change this. The world of open knowledge has grown, developed and matured in the last couple of years. Ten years ago we were mostly talking about governments publishing data openly. But now, our collective open knowledge universe includes many other areas like open access to academic publications and open research data. Many groups are actively involved in the area of personal data, where we citizens demand more control over the data we share with corporations on a day-by-day basis. We believe our vision is still very much valid: we still look ahead to a future where everyone has free and open access to key information, enabling every human, citizen, and consumer to understand and shape their lives, homes and the world. Our values are also as relevant as ever: open knowledge, as defined by the open definition, forms the cornerstone of what we do. We value respect and tolerance, collaboration not control. We are pragmatic, not fanatic, we make & talk, and we focus on making change in the world. The Open Knowledge Network is a lot more than just an aggregation of its parts. We know that we must keep these parts in constant relation. And we propose that the best way to do this is to keep the Network linked  through specific domains. This idea builds very much on the concept of Working Groups we have had for many years in the Open Knowledge Network. We have been inspired by the School of Data network who already work in this way – they develop their mission and align strategies between the various organisations that are members of the network – achieving great impact in data literacy in this way. We propose to develop thematic networks within the other domains that are important to multiple Open Knowledge groups. For example, based on a recent survey among Open Knowledge groups we think there is sufficient level of engagement around topics such as Fiscal Transparency, Open Data infrastructure, Open Science, OpenGLAM, and Personal Data. Such a network already exists in the area of data training with the School of Data network. There are opportunities, we believe, to benefit from more dedicated collaboration, exchange of ideas and plans and possibly even develop shared objectives in these areas among Open Knowledge partners. Unfortunately, due to the circumstances at Open Knowledge International, we are not in a position to organise the Open Knowledge Festival we envisioned, and that many of us fondly remember from Berlin (2014) and Helsinki (2012). Not going ahead with the Festival as planned is a very difficult decision for us. However we are keen to ensure that we hold an event that will be successful for the entire Network, taking the opportunity to gather the Open Knowledge Network on the same dates, to do something that is better fitting for where we are today. We are looking forward to bringing our partners together at an Open Knowledge Summit event in Thessaloniki in May 2018 that will help us all collaboratively build the future of the Open Knowledge Network. We will follow up with you, our partners in the Open Knowledge Network, over the next couple of weeks to work together on the idea of the domain networks that we started to outline above. We want to hear from you, if you feel this is the right approach for developing the Open Knowledge Network and incorporate your ideas. Together with you, we want to take the network to the next level in the build-up to May 2018, so that we can all come together in Thessaloniki as an opportunity to meet each other in person and work together within those domains that matter to us. More will follow on this in the next couple of weeks and months. Finally, we want to give a big shout-out to our partners at Open Knowledge Greece. We are very grateful for the hard work that they have put into making the event in Thessaloniki the best it can be, and we look forward to continuing our collaboration with them as amazing hosts for the Open Knowledge Summit.

Welcome to the Open Knowledge Finland 24h planning session 8.-9.12.2017 in Nuuksio

Open Knowledge Finland - November 24, 2017 in Events, Featured

WELCOME TO THE PLANNING RETREAT 8.-9.12.2017 in NUUKSIO

We want your insights! Where are we now, where are we going? JOIN the 24h retreat (at OKFI’s cost) to plan for the future Dec 8-9 in Nuuksio. Kaipaamme näkemystästi! Missä olemme, minne menemme? Tule mukaan 24h suunnittelutretriittiin (OKFI;n kustannuksella) 8.-9.12. Nuuksiossa. OKFI is 5 years old! As in the years before, time for a joint intensive planning session of 24 hours! Making sure we collectively take a helicopter view of where we are and where we need to go!

Goals and agenda

  • reflection and having a good time in good company
  • regrouping and team building
  • crystallizing the action plan for 2018
  • crystallizing more long term goals
  • solving and decision-making on SOME pragmatic issues
The key idea is that the program is crowdsourced and co-created to a large extent. Kindly have a look and COMMENT on the agenda! WHAT DO WE WANT TO DO?! Half a dozen sessions have been suggested, but many more needed! Let’s get creative!!! http://okf.fi/retreat-2017-agenda AGENDA – http://okf.fi/retreat-2017-agenda  – and this is to be co-created! There will be joint transportations (first leaving at 4 PM on Fri 8.12.) – kindly post any questions to the Facebook or Meetup event below, to the agenda doc, or to teemu.ropponen@okf.fi so the same info can be shared with others.

Sign up and other details

Please SIGN UP at http://okf.fi/retreat-2017-signup, preferably by 1 Dec, 2017. Cool if you can also show your interest at: Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/events/777120042489900/ Meetup – https://www.meetup.com/Open-Data-Finland/events/245105568/ The event will be in English AND Finnish, and who knows, Swedish and Portugese perhaps. The post Welcome to the Open Knowledge Finland 24h planning session 8.-9.12.2017 in Nuuksio appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Calling team players to join our board – let’s make Open Knowledge great!

Open Knowledge Finland - November 21, 2017 in äänestys, annual meeting, autumn general meeting, Board, Events, Featured, hallitus, Nofications, Official meeting, okfi, syyskokous, visio, vision, vuosikokous

The new board for Open Knowledge Finland is to be elected in the Autumn General Meeting on Dec 13. Will you be a changemaker and on our board!? There’s no need to make open knowledge or open data great again, because it already IS. However, Open Knowledge Finland is calling out to its members and to-be-members, and asking: Are you willing to help take this association one step further?!

Where are we now – where are we going?

Open Knowledge Finland is turning 5 years old before the end of the year! We’ve grown fast and become an influential player in the Finnish civil society, especially in the domains of digitalization, information society, data economy and open participatory co-creation. Right now our budget is over 500 000 eur annually, we have nearly 500 members, we foster the community of over 5000 open data enthusiasts. We’ve implemented dozens of projects and our events have had visitors from over 30 countries! Most importantly, we have helped make changes in the Finnish society.  For further details, have a look at the 2016 annual report. In our current vision for 2020: We are a well-known significant player in the Finnish societal discussion on digitalisation and data economy, bringing forward especially the views of data users, data subjects and advocates of openness – from the grassroots. OKFI brings together and foster the community of open data and open knowledge enthusiasts and stakeholders. We are a laboratory of openness, continuously experimenting with new ideas and ways of working. We implement open data and open knowledge projects that have a significant societal impact. In addition to innovation, we serve the society by providing trainings and services. We work across borders and are an active participant in international discussion.

Looking ahead. 

We are in the process of planning 2018 and onwards. We hope you can participate:

OKFI board for 2018 – senior expertise and young blood?

Many of the board members have served for 2 or even more terms. Thus many are wanting to step down and give room to others. It will be great to have a great combination of fresh blood and old experience! The board is on its way to becoming a bit less operative, and a bit more strategic – as it should be.

Why apply for the board?

Being on the board gives you a great position to influence the association and the impact that it makes. You get to meet and work with some of the sharpest minds in Finland and internationally – both at OKFI as well as its partenrs and others stakeholders. Building on YOUR strengths and passions, you will help OKFI grow. While being a board members requires some work and has some responsibilities, it is also a blast! Do it! If you are willing to be candidate for chairman, board member or other position of trust (e.g., regional, working group lead), please let us know! http://okf.fi/candidate-for-2018 Big thanks and hugs to everyone who has served on our board in our first 5 years!!! The post Calling team players to join our board – let’s make Open Knowledge great! appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

「これからどうする、官民データ活用法」開催報告

okfj - November 16, 2017 in Events, Featured, News, Open Data, オープンデータ, 官民データ活用推進基本法

当日の様子 2017/11/14の夜に、オプンデータ・トークシリーズの第21回となる「これからどうする、官民データ活用法」を開催しました。当日参加いただいた皆様、ありがとうございました。 冒頭、内閣官房情報通信技術(IT)総合戦略室山路参事官より「政府におけるオープンデータの取組」についてご紹介頂きました。
都道府県の単位でみると40箇所がすでにオープンデータに取り組んでおり、残り7つ。基礎自治体では約260とまだまだこれからの状況です。政府としてさらに推進するために「自治体ガイドライン」「地方公共団体向けパッケージ」「オープンデータ100」「フォーマット標準例」「オープンデータ伝道師」など、モノとヒトの両面から支援の枠組みを用意しています。ぜひ周知、活用を進めて行きたいものです。
以下資料の見出しのみ列挙します。
1. 官民データ活用推進基本法関連の動き
2. 行政保有データの棚卸し
3. 官民データ相談窓口の設置
4. 官民ラウンドテーブルの開催(案)
5.地方公共団体によるオープンデータの取り組み 次に、OKJP副理事長の川島より「これからどうする 官民データ活用推進基本法」と題して、官民データ活用推進基本計画はきっかけであり、皆で誰もが情報の価値を最大限享受できる社会(知らなくて困ったのない社会)を創っていこう、という呼びかけが行われました。
以下見出しのみ列挙します。
1. データによる共創(Data Collaboratives)
2. ユースケースから考えよう
3. Glocal by Default
4. 一人一人が情報のリスクを判断できる社会へ
5. サービスとしてのコミュニティCommunity as a Service (CaaS) 最後に、参加者からの質問をその場で受け付け、いいねの多い順に答えていけるツールSli.doによる質疑応答が行われ、50件余りの質問が寄せられました。
以下、質問の一部をご紹介します。要望ばかりでなく自分たちでできることの提案があったり、また会場内から回答のフォローもあり、まさに官民連携した動きを作り出していこうという意気込みが感じられるイベントとなりました。()内の数字は会場のいいね数。
  • (9)自治体関係者が不在の中で、自治体の課題を議論しても限界がある気がします。国のデータの更なる公開に向けた取組についてお聞きできればと思います。
  • (7)地方公共団体のオープンデータへの取り組みに関して、自治体数でのみ評価されているが、実際は一度データを公開したっきり、その後の継続的な活動が行われていないような自治体もあるように思います。もっと質的な評価も必要ではないでしょうか?
  • (7)「官民データ活用推進計画策定の手引」にコミュニティ側からフィードバックをしたいです。Google Docs で原文が公開されたりしたら、提案しやすいなーなんて思います。
  • (7)地番や住居表示の位置情報のように公開されるのが当然と思われるデータでも公開できないと考えられているものもある。こういう考えて方を行政として議論して整理してほしい。
  • (7)自治体間でアイデアの共有、試行錯誤の共有をする場が必要だと思っています。そのような場を設定しませんか?
  • (7)地方公共団体のオープンデータへの取り組みに関して、自治体数でのみ評価されているが、実際は一度データを公開したっきり、その後の継続的な活動が行われていないような自治体もあるように思います。もっと質的な評価も必要ではないでしょうか?
  • (6)データとAPIはセットだと思います。 APIがあれば利用もしやすいです。
  • (6)小規模な自治体であれば、自治体内の事業者も限られていて、オープンデータ活用の需要が感じられない面もあるかと思います。例えば、人口10万人未満の小規模自治体でオープンデータ活用が進んだ事例があれば、教えてもらえませんか?
  • (6)行政の中で切り離しできるフォーマットの見直しは大賛成です!
  • (6)最近海外では、openwashingという単語がしばしば聞かれるようになりました。ショボいデータだけ公開するなど、クリティカルなデータを公開せず、「やったことにするオープンデータ」が次の課題のひとつと言われています。事例ベースだと、そのようなデータが公開の中心になる可能性が高いのではないでしょうか。
  • (6)先日の衆議院選挙はオープンデータになっていますか?
  • (6)本当に小さい自治体では自前のオープンデータサーバを持つのはしんどいのではないか。国が無償のサーバを提供できないか。
  • (6)オープンデータは可視化アプローチだけでなく、データ連携を対象とした場合、データフュージョンなど解析的なアプローチも必要かと考えています。こうした研究との連携について、自治体と民間と研究機関(データ分析企業等)との連携事例を作りませんか。

Webinar: Open Access and its value for Open Education

Annalisa Manca - October 23, 2017 in Events, openaccess, openaccessweek

 
In occasion of Open Access Week, the Open Education Working Group is organising a Webinar in which Teresa Nobre, Ivonne Lujano and Graham Steel will discuss Open Access and its value for Open Education.
 
The Webinar will

AbreLatam / Condatos: after the first 5 years

Oscar Montiel - October 12, 2017 in abrelatam, condatos, Events, Latin America, Open Data

This is a somewhat belated entry about the Abrelatam and Condatos, the regional open data conference of Latin America. It comes more than a month after the conference took place in San José, Costa Rica, but the questions raised there are still relevant and super important for advancing open data in Latin America and working towards truly open states. After five years, the discussions have shifted. We don’t only talk about open data and how to make it happen but about, for example: privacy and how we can make sure our governments will guarantee this the right to privacy in open data work; data standards and how to make them interoperable; and business models and how to be a sustainable organization that can last beyond project funding. These discussions are crucial in the current context in Latin America, with cases of corruption like Lava Jato or #GobiernoEspía in Mexico. They are particularly important if we want open data to not only be a bunch of good intentions, but rather infrastructure that is there for and because of citizens. Still, we have a big challenge ahead. As it was often commented in various sessions, we need to systematize all the knowledge we have gathered in these 5 years. We also need to be able to share it with the newcomers and open it up to organizations that aren’t traditionally in the open data sphere. This will help us avoid the echo chamber and keep the work focused on important matters and make open data a valuable asset in the construction of open states. At the same time, we need to learn from our mistakes, understand what has worked and what hasn’t, continue improving the work, not only go to conferences and speak about the amazing work we do, but also talk about where we make mistakes and help other avoid them. This won’t be an easy task, but I think we have the right ingredients to make it happen: we have a mature community that is eager to share its experiences and learnings. We’re ready to take on the next five years and construct an open region.  

MyData 2017 -konferenssi luo perustaa reilulle, ihmiskeskeiselle ja sykkivälle datataloudelle

Open Knowledge Finland - August 28, 2017 in Conference, datatalous, estonia, ethics, Events, Featured, finland, gdpr, impact, My Data, mydata, mydata 2016, mydata 2017, mydata alliance, mydata declaration, Open Data, vaikuttavuus, Working Groups

Ke 30.8. Tallinnassa, Tallinn University Conference Centre, Narva Maantee 29 To-pe 31.8.-1.9. Helsingissä, Kulttuuritalo, Sturenkatu 4 Kolmipäiväinen MyData 2017 -konferenssi vauhdittaa siirtymää yrityskeskeisestä henkilökohtaisen datan hallinnasta ja hyödyntämisestä kohti ihmiskeskeistä ja yksilöllistä datan hallintaa. Konferenssissa julkaistaan MyData Declaration, eli ihmiskeskeisen tietojenkäsittelyn teesit, jotka ovat allekirjoitettavissa konferenssin aikana. Yksinkertaistettuna MyData -periaatteet voimaannuttavat kansalaisia/palveluiden käyttäjiä, sillä käyttäjä itse voi esimerkiksi uudelleenkäyttää itsestään kerättyä tietoa tai määritellä, miten tietoa jaetaan esimerkiksi muihin palveluihin, mainostajille, tutkijoille tai muille tiedon hyödyntäjille. MyData tulee paitsi tehostamaan julkisia palveluita, myös tuottamaan aivan uudenlaisia palveluinnovaatioita ja on myös todennäköistä, että käyttäjät itse voivat esimerkiksi myydä tietoja itsestään mainostajille. MyData voimaannuttaa kuluttajakansalaisen.

MyData nivoutuu vahvasti tiedon avoimuuteen – ja on internetin suuria haasteita

World Wide Webin keksijä Sir Tim Berners-Lee on nostanyt henkilötiedon käsittelyn yhdeksi kolmesta suuresta internetin tulevaisuutta määrittäväksi haasteeksi. Siksi henkilötieto onkin ollut tärkeä asia Euroopan digitalisaatioagendalla ja uusi EU:n tietosuoja-asetus (GDPR) astumassa voimaan alle vuoden päästä. Siinä missä tietosuoja-asetus tuo itsessään kansalaisille turvaa ja uusia digitaalisia oikeuksia henkilötietoon liittyen, MyData tavallaan rakentaa tämän päälle, tuomalla lisää oikeuksia, ja määrittelemällä periaatteet ja eräänlaisen arkkitehtuurin sille miten henkilötietoa hallinnoidaan käyttäjän ja palveluiden kesken. Myös henkilötietoon liittyvien palveluiden taloudellinen merkitys on valtava. Henkilötiedot ovat yksi merkittävimmistä tulevaisuuden liiketoimintaa muokkaavista voimista (World Economic Forum, 2013) ja niihin liittyvien palvelujen kokonaismarkkinan on arvioitu kasvavan Euroopassa jopa 1000 miljardiin euroon vuonna 2020 (Boston Consulting Group, 2012). Nokkela lukija kysyy mitä tekemistä MyDatalla on avoimen tiedon ja avoimen datan kanssa. Siinä missä avoin data viittaa kaikkien julkisesti saatavilla oleviin tietovarantoihin, MyDatassa puolestaan yksi olennainen osa on vastaavasti yksilön Kansainvälisen Open Knowledge -järjestön (ent. Open Knowledge Foundation) perustaja Rufus Pollock tiivisti avoimen datan ja MyDatan suhteen viime vuoden konferenssissa. Avoimen datan potentiaaliseksi suoraksi hyödyksi on arvioitu 40 miljardia ja välillisiksi 100 miljardia euroa vuosittain EU -alueella (Vickery, 2011).  Sinänsä arviot ovat suuntaa antavia, mutta kokoluokaltaan henkilötiedon taloudellinen potentiaali on näin arvioituna jopa kymmenkertainen avoimen datan potentiaaliin verrattuna. Teimme Valtioneuvoston selvitys- ja tutkimustoiminnalle (VN TEAS) selvityksen avoimen datan taloudellisista vaikutuksista ja yksi raportin löydöksistä olikin nimenomaan se, että tarvitaan laajempaa datatalouden osaamista ja että arvo syntyy yhdistelmällä erilaisia datalähteitä. Toki on tärkeää muistaa, ettei kyse ole vain taloudellisesta merkityksestä. Yhtä kaikki, avoin data, MyData, tekoäly, big data, data-analytiikka – mm. nämä kulkevat käsi kädessä ja lisäävät toinen toisensa merkitystä ja vaikuttavuutta datataloudessa.

MyData 2017 -konferenssi – kansainvälinen yhteisö luo tulevaisuuden!

Toista kertaa järjestettävä tapahtuma on ainutlaatuinen, sillä se tuo yhteen yritykset, yhteisöt, kansalaisjärjestöt tutkijat ja hallinnon edustajat. Viime vuonna ensimmäistä kertaa järjestetyssä konferenssissa oli 670 henkeä 25 maasta, eli onnistumme mainiosti. Viime vuoden konferenssin merkitystä ei kannata aliarvioida, sillä sen jälkeen MyData-verkostoja on käynnistetty useissa maissa, alunperin Liikenne- ja viestintäministeriölle tehty MyData selvitys on käännetty useille kielille ja julkaistu ympäri maailmaa, ja yli 400 hengen MyData-konferenssi järjestetty Japanissa. Tänä vuonna MyData 2017 -tapahtuma järjestetään 3-päiväisenä (30.8. – 1.9.2017) siten, että ensimmäinen päivä on Tallinnassa (tietyt teemasessiot ja akateeminen osuus), ja kaksi päivää (päätapahtuma) Helsingissä. Odotamme paikalle yli 700 henkeä – mukana on peräti yli 150 puhujaa, ja yli 40 eri sessiota! Olemme pyrkineet pitämään lippujen hinnat maltillisena, että saadaan osallistujia erityyppisistä organisaatioista mukaan. Liput saa ostettua suoraan sivulta:  https://mydata2017.org/registration/ MyData 2017 -konferenssin järjestävät yhteistyössä Open Knowledge Finland, Aalto-yliopisto, Tallinnan yliopisto, ja ranskalainen tutkimusorganisaatio Fing. Konferenssi on yhteisöllisesti tuotettu – mukana on noin 10 palkattua henkilöä, yli 35 vapaaehtoista ja yli 50 ohjelman tuottajaa – ja se on Open Knowledge Finlandin vuoden suurin tapahtuma – tervetuloa mukaan!
Yo. tekstissä mainittuja lähteitä: Rufus Pollock MyData 2016 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4SRUqQO_1CQ MyData Declaration https://mydata.org/declaration/ Three challenges for the web, according to its inventor, The Web Foundation (March 12, 2017) https://webfoundation.org/2017/03/web-turns-28-letter/  Boston Consulting Group. (2012). The Value of Our Digital Identity. Liberty global Policy Series. PDF-dokumentti. Saatavissa: http://www.libertyglobal.com/PDF/public-policy/The-Value-of-Our-Digital-Identity.pdf. Koski, H., Honkanen, M., Luukkonen, J., Pajarinen, M., & Ropponen, T. (2017). Avoimen datan hyödyntäminen ja vaikuttavuus. VNK.  Saatavissa: http://tietokayttoon.fi/julkaisu?pubid=18703 Vickery, G. (2011). Review of Recent Studies on PSI Re-Use and Related Market Developments. PDF-dokumentti. Saatavissa: https://www.nsgic.org/public_resources/Vickery.pdf. World Economic Forum. (2013). Unlocking the Value of Personal Data: From Collection to Usage. PDF-dokumentti. Saatavissa: http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_IT_UnlockingValuePersonalData_CollectionUsage_Report_2013.pdf. The post MyData 2017 -konferenssi luo perustaa reilulle, ihmiskeskeiselle ja sykkivälle datataloudelle appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Ten Cool Things I Learned at DataJConf

Yan Naung Oak - August 18, 2017 in Events, fellowship

I had a fantastic time at the European Computational and Data Journalism Conference in Dublin on 6-7 July in the company of many like-minded data journalists, academics, and open data practitioners. There were a lot of stimulating ideas shared during the presentations on the first day, the unconference on the second day, and the many casual conversations in between! In this post I’d like to share the ten ideas that stuck with me the most (it was tough to whittle it down to just ten!). Hopefully you’ll find these thoughts interesting, and hopefully they’ll spark some worthwhile discussions about data journalism and storytelling. I’d really love to hear what you have to say about all of this, so please do share any thoughts or observations that you might have below the line! image alt text The European Data and Computational Journalism Conference, Dublin, 6-7 July 2017
  1. ‘Deeper’ data journalism is making a real impact
Marianne Bouchart – manager of the Data Journalism Awards – gave a presentation introducing some of the most exciting award winners of 2017, and talked about some of the most important new trends in data journalism today. Perhaps unsurprisingly, given the electoral rollercoasters of the past year, a lot of great data journalism has been centred around electioneering and other political dramas. Marianne said that “impact” was the theme that ran through the best pieces produced last year, and she really stressed the central role that investigative journalism needs to play in producing strong data-driven stories. She said that impactful investigative journalism is increasingly merging with data journalism, as we saw in projects shedding light on shady anti-transparency moves by Brazilian politicians, investigating the asset-hoarding of Serbian politicians, and exposing irresponsible police handling of sexual assault cases in Canada.
  1. Machine learning could bring a revolution in data journalism
Two academics presented on the latest approaches to computational journalism – journalism that applies machine learning techniques to dig into a story. Marcel Broersma from the University of Groningen presented on an automated analysis of politicians’ use of social media. The algorithm analysed 80,000 tweets from Dutch, British and Belgian politicians to identify patterns of what he called the ‘triangle of political communication’ between politicians, journalists, and citizens. The project wasn’t without its difficulties, though – algorithmically detecting sarcasm still remained a challenge, and the limited demographics of Twitter users meant that this kind of research could only look at how narrow certain segments of society communicated. Jennifer Stark from the University of Maryland looked at the possibilities for algorithms to be biased – specifically looking at Google Image Search’s representations of presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump’s photos during their campaigns. Through the use of an image recognition API that detects emotions, she found that Clinton’s pictures were biased towards showing her appear happier whereas for Trump, both happiness and anger were overrepresented. Although it’s still early days for computational journalism, talks like these hinted at exciting new data journalism methods to come!
  1. There are loads of ways to learn new skills!
The conference was held at the beautiful University College Dublin, where a brand new master’s program in data journalism is being launched this year. We also heard from one of the conference organisers, Martin Chorley, about Cardiff University’s Master’s in Computational and Data Journalism, which has been going strong for three years, and has had a great track record of placing students into employment. But formal education isn’t the only way to get those cutting edge data journo skills! One of the conference organisers also presented the results of a worldwide survey of data journalists, taking in responses from 180 data journalists across 44 countries. One of the study’ most notable findings was that only half of respondents had formal training in data journalism – the rest picked up the necessary skills all by themselves. Also, when asked how they wanted to further their skills, more respondents said they wanted to brush up on their skills in short courses rather than going back to school full-time.
  1. Want good government data? Be smart (and be charming)!
One of the most fascinating parts of the conference for me was learning about the different ways data journalists obtained data for their projects. Kathryn Tourney from The Detail in Northern Ireland found Freedom of Information requests useful, but with the caveat that you really needed to know the precise structure of the data you are requesting in order to get the best data. Kathryn would conduct prior research on the exact schemas of government databases and work to get hold of the forms that the government used to collect the data she wanted before making the actual FOI requests. This ensured that there was no ambiguity about what she’d receive on the other side! Conor Ryan from Ireland’s RTÉ found that he didn’t need to make FOI requests to do deep investigative work, because there was already a lot of government data “available” to the public. The catch was that this data was often buried behind paywalls and multiple layers of bureaucracy. Conor stressed the importance of ensuring that any data sources RTÉ managed to wrangle were also made available in a more accessible way for future users. One example related to accessing building registry data in Ireland, where originally a €5 fee existed for every request made. Conor and his team pointed out this obstacle to the authorities and persuaded them to change the rules so that the data would be available in bulk in the future. Lastly, during the unconference one story from Bulgaria really resonated with my own experiences trying to get a hold of data from governments in closed societies. A group of techies offered the Bulgarian government help with an array of technical issues, and by building relationships with staff on the ground – as well as getting the buy-in of political decision makers – they were able to get their hands on a great deal of data that would have forever remained inaccessible if they’d gone through the ‘standard’ channels for accessing public information.
  1. The ethics of data sharing are tricky
The best moments at these conferences are the ones that make you go: “Hmm… I never thought about it that way before!”. During Conor Ryan’s presentation, he really emphasized the need for data journalists to consider the ethics of sharing the data that they have gathered or analysed. He pointed out that there’s a big difference between analysing data internally and reporting on a selected set of verifiable results, and publishing the entire dataset from your analysis publicly. In the latter case, every single row of data becomes a potential defamation suit waiting to happen. This is especially true when the dataset involved is disaggregated down the level of individuals!
  1. Collaboration is everything
Being a open data practitioner means that my dream scenarios are collaborations on data-driven projects between techies, journalists and civil society groups. So it was really inspiring to hear Megan Lucero talk about how The Bureau Local (at the Bureau of Investigative Journalism) has built up a community of civic techies, local journalists, and civil society groups across the UK. Even though The Bureau Local was only set up a few months ago, they quickly galvanized this community around the 2017 UK general elections, and launched four different collaborative investigative data journalism projects. One example is their piece on targeted ads during the election campaign, where they collaborated with the civic tech group Who Targets Me to collect and analyse data about the kinds of political ads targeting social media users. I’d love to see more experiments like The Bureau Local emerging in other countries as well! In fact, one of the main purposes of Open and Shut is precisely to build this kind of community for folks in closed societies who want to collaborate on data-driven investigations. So please get involved! image alt text Who Targets Me? Is an initiative working to collect and analyse data about the kinds of political ads targeting social media users.
  1. Data journalism needs cash – so where can we find it?
It goes without saying these days that journalism is having a bad time of it at the moment. Advertising and subscription revenues don’t pull in nearly as much cash as the used to. Given that pioneering data-driven investigative journalism takes a lot of time and effort, the question that naturally arises is: “where do we get the money for all this?”. Perhaps unsurprisingly, no-one at DataJConf had any straightforward answers to this question. A lot of casual conversations in between sessions drifted onto the topic of funding for data journalism, and lots of people seemed worried that innovative work in the field is currently too dependent on funding from foundations. That being said, attendees also shared stories about interesting funding experiments being undertaken around the world, with the Korean Center for Investigative Journalism’s crowdfunding approach gaining some interest.
  1. Has data journalism been failing us?
In the era of “fake news” and “alternative facts”, a recurring topic in many conversations was about whether data journalism actually had any serious positive impacts. During the unconference discussions, some of us ended up being sucked into the black hole question of “What constitutes proper journalism anyway?”. It wasn’t all despair and navel-gazing, however, and we definitely identified a few concrete things that could be improved. One related to the need to better represent uncertainty in data journalism. This ties into questions of improving the public’s data literacy, but also of traditional journalism’s tendency to present attention-grabbing leads and conclusions without doing enough to convey complexity and nuance. People kept referencing FiveThirtyEight’s election prediction page, which contained a sophisticated representation of the uncertainty in their modelling, but hid it all below the fold – an editorial decision, it was argued, that lulled readers into thinking that the big number that they saw at the top of the page was the only thing that mattered. image alt text FiveThirtyEight’s forecast of the 2016 US elections showed a lot of details below the fold about their forecasting model’s uncertainty, but most readers just looked at the big percentages at the top. Another challenge identified by attendees was that an enormous amount of resources were being deployed to preach to the choir instead of reaching out to a broader base of readers. The unconference participants pointed out that a lot of the sophisticated data journalism stories written in the run-up to the 2016 US elections were geared towards partisan audiences. We agreed that we needed to see more accessible, impactful data stories that were not so mired in party politics, such as ProPublica’s insightful piece on rising US maternal mortality rates.
  1. Data journalism can be incredibly powerful in the Global South
Many of the talks were about data journalism as it was practised in Western countries – with one notable exception. Eva Constantaras, who trains investigative data journalism teams in the Global South, held a wonderful presentation about the impactfulness of data journalism in the developing world. She gave the examples of IndiaSpend in India and The Nation in Kenya, and spoke about how their data-driven stories worked to identify problems that resonated with the public, and explain them in an accessible and impactful way. Election coverage in these two examples shared by Eva focused on investigating the consequences of the policy proposals of politicians, engaging in fact-checking, and identifying the kinds of problems that were faced by voters in reality. Without the burden of partisan echo-chambers, and because data journalism is still very new and novel in many parts of the world, data journalism could end up having a huge impact on public debate and storytelling in the Global South. Watch this space! image alt text Kenya’s *The Nation has been producing data-driven stories more and more frequently, such as **this piec*e* on Kenya’s Eleventh Elections in August 2017*
  1. Storytelling has to connect on a human level
If there was one recurring theme that I heard throughout the conference about what makes data journalism impactful, it was that the data-driven story has to connect on a human level. Eva had a slide in her talk with a quote from John Steinbeck about what makes a good story: “If a story is not about the hearer he [or she] will not listen… A great lasting story is about everyone, or it will not last. The strange and foreign is not interesting – only the deeply personal and familiar.” Embed youtube video: https://youtu.be/lFEHt_gOcwo “I want loads of money” — Councillor Hugh McElvaney caught on hidden camera video from RTÉ Conor from RTÉ also drove the same point home. After his team’s extensive data-driven investigative work revealed corruption in Irish politics, the actual story that they broke involved a hidden-camera video of an undercover interview with one of these politicians. This video highlighted just one datapoint in a very visceral way, which ultimately resonated more with the audience than any kind of data visualisation could.
I could go on for longer, but that’s probably quite enough for one blog post! Thanks for reading this far, and I hope you managed to gain some nice insights from my experiences at DataJConf. It was a fascinating couple of days, and I’m looking forward to building upon all of these exciting new ideas in the months ahead! If any of these thoughts have got you excited, curious (or maybe even furious) we’d love to hear from you below the line. *Open & Shut is a project from the **Small Medi*a* team. Small Media are an organisation working to support freedom of information in closed societies, and are behind the portal **Iran Open Dat*a*.* Flattr this!

Rahoitus & uudet projektit: Isoja ideoita avoimesta datasta?!

Open Knowledge Finland - August 15, 2017 in avoimuus, avoin data, Events, funding, kokeiliu, Nofications, projects, rahoitus, rahoitushaut, Working Groups, yhteistyö

Varma lähestyvän syksyn merkki on, kun säätiöt ja rahastot julkaisevat omia hakuilmoituksiaan. Seuraavan 2 kuukauden aikana on ainakin 5 eri hakua, jotka voisivat olla relevantteja myös avoimen datan ja avoimuuden edistäjille. Mm. seuraaviin hakuihin kannattaa mielestäni miettiä, kukin omista lähtökohdistaan, olisko jotain innostavaa mitä haluaisimme edistää!? Open Knowledge Finland ry on tehnyt yli 40 innostavaa projektia viimeisen viiden vuoden aikana – erittäin kiinnostavien kumppaneiden kanssa. Mitä kehittäisimme tällä kertaa?

Koneen säätiö

KIRA-digi

  • KIRA-digi tarjoaa rahoitusta kokeiluille, jotka edistävät rakennetun ympäristön ja rakentamisen digitalisaatiota. Kokeilujen tavoitteena on 1) vauhdittaa alan toimintatapojen muutosta, 2) mahdollistaa erilaisten mallien ja kehittämispolkujen testaaminen sekä 3) standardien ratkaisujen sovittaminen käytäntöön. Kokeiluja rahoitetaan yhteensä noin 4 miljoonalla eurolla vuosina 2016-2018.
  • Avoimen datan kulma? Paljon! On 3D-malleja, karttoja, paikkatietoa, energiaa, yms.
  • Lisätietoa: http://www.kiradigi.fi/3-kokeiluhankkeet/hakuilmoitus.html
  • Deadline 31.8.2017

Nesslingin säätiö

  • Nesslingin Säätiö tukee ympäristönsuojelua edistävää tutkimusta sekä tutkitun ympäristötiedon viestintää ja jalkauttamista yhteiskuntaan.
  • Avoimen datan kulma? Esimerkiksi lajirikkauskarttaa voisi hyvin viedä eteenpäin, joskin sitä haettiin (onnistumatta) vuonna 2016. Ilmastomuutos on jatkuvasti kasvava huoli ja avoimen datan osuus sen tutkimuksessa ja ymmmärtämistä ja olennaista. Entäpä Suomen kaivosteollisuus ja sen ympäristövaikutukset?
  • Lisätietoa: http://www.nessling.fi/apurahat/avoimet-haut/
  • Deadline: 15.9.2017

Kordelinin säätiö

  • Tiivis kuvaus: Alfred Kordelinin säätiö tukee apurahoin ja palkinnoin tieteitä, kirjallisuutta, taiteita ja kansanvalistusta.
  • Avoimen datan kulma? Esimerkiksi avoimen tieteen tai demokratian saralla (esim. faktantarkistus, vaalit, tutkittu tieto päätöksentekoon, päätöksenteko kansantajuiseksi, tms.) voisi löytyä sarkaa.
  • Lisätietoa: https://kordelin.fi/apurahat-2/
  • Deadline: 31.8.2017

Kokeilu- ja kehittämishankeavustus kulttuuritoimijoille

Muita hakuja

On hyvä huomata, että relevantteja hakuja on luultavasti tulossa myös Helsingin Innovaatiorahastolta ja 6Aika-hankkeelta. Vaikka näiden painopisteet eivät ole tiedossa vielä, kannattaa niitä miettiä jo nyt, kun on rutkasti aikaa.

Jatketaanko keskustelua?

Suosimme avointa keskustelua. Jatketaan keskustelua avoimesti esimerkiksi näin: The post Rahoitus & uudet projektit: Isoja ideoita avoimesta datasta?! appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.