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Autumn general assembly and Xmas party

- November 5, 2019 in Events, Featured

Save the date! Our xmas party and general autumn assembly are held on Tuesday the 10th of December at Maria01   The post Autumn general assembly and Xmas party appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

csv,conf returns for version 5 in May

- October 15, 2019 in #CSVconf, Events, Frictionless Data, News, Open Data, Open Government Data, Open Research, Open Science, Open Software

Save the data for csv,conf,v5! The fifth version of csv,conf will be held at the University of California, Washington Center in Washington DC, USA, on May 13 and 14, 2020.    If you are passionate about data and its application to society, this is the conference for you. Submissions for session proposals for 25-minute talk slots are open until February 7, 2020, and we encourage talks about how you are using data in an interesting way (like to uncover a crossword puzzle scandal). We will be opening ticket sales soon, and you can stay updated by following our Twitter account @CSVconference.   csv,conf is a community conference that is about more than just comma-sepatated-values – it brings together a diverse group to discuss data topics including data sharing, data ethics, and data analysis from the worlds of science, journalism, government, and open source. Over two days, attendees will have the opportunity to hear about ongoing work, share skills, exchange ideas (and stickers!) and kickstart collaborations.   
csv,conf,v4

Attendees of csv,conf,v4

First launched in July 2014,  csv,conf has expanded to bring together over 700 participants from 30 countries with backgrounds from varied disciplines. If you’ve missed the earlier years’ conferences, you can watch previous talks on topics like data ethics, open source technology, data journalism, open internet, and open science on our YouTube channel. We hope you will join us in Washington D.C. in May to share your own data stories and join the csv,conf community!   Csv,conf,v5 is supported by the Sloan Foundation through OKFs Frictionless Data for Reproducible Research grant as well as by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and the Frictionless Data team is part of the conference committee. We are happy to answer all questions you may have or offer any clarifications if needed. Feel free to reach out to us on csv-conf-coord@googlegroups.com, on twitter @CSVconference or our dedicated community slack channel   We are committed to diversity and inclusion, and strive to be a supportive and welcoming environment to all attendees. To this end, we encourage you to read the Conference Code of Conduct.
Rojo the Comma Llama

While we won’t be flying Rojo the Comma Llama to DC for csv,conf,v5, we will have other mascot surprises in store.

OKFI 24h retreat

- October 13, 2019 in Events, Featured

We cordially invite you to attend the annual OKFI 24H retreat on 8.-9.11.2019 at 16-16 o’clock to Suomenlinna / Sea Fortress island. The program includes planning strategic directions for OKFI and networking over sauna. For further information about the event and registration please visit: https://forms.gle/qZ8mexyBvogfvF2y7 The post OKFI 24h retreat appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

2019 International Open Data Summit開催のお知らせ

- October 7, 2019 in Events, Featured, Special

一般社団法人オープン・ナレッジ・ファウンデーション・ジャパン(OKJP)が後援する 2019 International Open Data Summitが10月8日(火)、東京大学安田講堂にて開催されます。 Asia Open Data Partnership (AODP) は、アジア各国・地域の文化とニーズを踏まえたオープンデータの普及と活用、情報共有、国際協力等を目的に、台湾の呼びかけで2015年10月14日に設立され、日本も2017年から参加しています。AODPでは、各国・地域のオープンデータの活用を促進するハッカソン(Open Data Challenge)の運営と、「International Open Data Summit」を毎年1回開催しています。本Summitは、アジアを中心とした各国・地域におけるオープンデータの普及・活用に関する活動の進捗状況や課題等の情報共有、パネルディスカッション等を通じて、オープンデータの普及促進を目的として開催します。 開催日時:2019年10月8日(火)10:00〜17:25
開催場所:東京大学 安田講堂 主催:内閣官房IT総合戦略室 / 東京大学大学院情報学環/ Asia Open Data Partnership (AODP)
共催:総務省 / 東京都 / 一般社団法人オープン&ビッグデータ活用・地方創生推進機構(VLED)
後援:経産省 / 気象庁 / 公共交通オープンデータ協議会 / オープンガバメント推進協議会 / 一般財団法人 全国地域情報化推進協会(APPLIC) / トロンフォーラム / 一般社団法人オープン・ナレッジ・ファウンデーション・ジャパン / 一般社団法人オープン・コーポレイツ・ジャパン OKJPからは、庄司と川島がモデレーターとして登壇します。 詳細は公式サイトをご参照ください。

A recap of the 2019 eLife Innovation Sprint

- September 26, 2019 in Events, Frictionless Data, Open Science

Over 36 hours, Jo Barratt and Lilly Winfree from Open Knowledge Foundation’s Frictionless Data team joined 60 people from around the world to develop innovative solutions to open science obstacles at the 2019 eLife Innovation Sprint. This quick, collaborative event in Cambridge, UK, on September 4th and 5th brought together designers, scientists, coders, project managers, and communications experts to develop their budding ideas into functional prototypes. Projects focused on all aspects of open science, including but not limited to improving scientific publishing, data management, and increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion. Both Jo and Lilly pitched projects and thoroughly enjoyed working with their teams on these projects.  Lilly pitched creating an open science game that could be used to teach scientists about open best practices in a fun and informative way. Read on to learn more about these projects, and their experiences at the Sprint. Jo proposed making a podcast documenting the Sprint experience, projects, and people aiming to that would be fully produced and edited and publish the piece during the Sprint.  Lilly’s inspiration to create an open science game came from her experience at Force11 in 2018, where she played a game about FAIR data (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable). She realized that playing a game can be a great way to learn about a subject that might otherwise seem dry, and creating a game prototype seemed like a fun, accessible, and achievable goal for the Sprint. The open science game team formed with eight people from diverse backgrounds, including a game designer, board game enthusiasts, publishers, and scientists. This mix of backgrounds was a big asset to the team, and played a large role in the development of a functional game prototype. To start designing the game, the team first decided that the goal of the game should be to teach scientists about open science best practices, while the collaborative goal for the players would be to make an important scientific discovery – like curing a disease. The team crafted the storyline of the game, and finally worked on the game play mechanics. In the end, the game was made for 2-5 players and ideally would take about 30-45 minutes to play. To play, each player gets a role card — Lab Principal Investigator, Graduate Student, Data Management Librarian, Teaching Assistant, and Data Scientist. Each of these roles has personas and attributes that impact the game. For instance, the Principal Investigator has negative attributes that make sharing research openly harder, while the Teaching Assistant has positive attributes that make it easier to teach new tools to other players. On each turn, the players can draw research object cards or tool cards that help advance the game, but might also draw an event card, which can have positive of negative effects on the gameplay. The ultimate goal is for the players to share their research findings, which requires the player to draw and “research” an insight card and it’s related methods card, data collection card, and analysis card. The game ends once enough research findings are shared (either openly or with restricted access). A fun and interesting part of the game is that the players can role play their characters and see how attitudes towards open science differ and how those attitudes affect the progression of science. Hint: to win the game, the players have to cooperate with each other and openly share at least some of their research findings. The team is currently digitising the game so others can play it – keep track of their progress on their GitHub Repository.
“My team was fantastic to work with. I came to the Sprint with a basic idea and a hope that we could create a fun, educational game on open science, but my team really ran with the idea and created a game that is so much more than I had hoped for!” – Lilly Winfree, OKF

OKF delivery manager, Jo Barratt, brought his storytelling talents to the forefront for the eLife Sprint by proposing the creation of a podcast to document the people and ideas at the Sprint. Jo has produced many podcasts over the years, and thought the podcast format would offer a unique perspective into the inner workings of the Sprint. He was delighted to have two other Sprint members join his Podcast team: Hannah Drury and Elsa Loissel from eLife. Neither Hannah nor Elsa had worked on a podcast before, but both were eager and quick learners. Their project started with Jo giving Hannah and Elsa quick lessons on interviewing, using recording equipment, editing and sound design. Jo was really excited to have such collaborative team members to work with, which was very in line with the synergistic spirit of the Sprint. To capture a feel for the essence of the Sprint, Hannah and Elsa began by interviewing most Sprint members, asking them questions like about their backgrounds and what they hoped to get out of the sprint. Interviewees were also asked to give their views on what ‘open science’ means to them. Next, the team interviewed several projects for a more in depth discussion into how the Sprint works and what types of projects were being developed. In the final podcast, there are interviews with the teams from the open science game project, one on equitable preprints, the project looking at computational training best practices, and the high performance computing in Africa team. Each of these segments shows the people, methods, and progress of the projects, highlighting the diverse people and ideas at the Sprint and giving listeners insight into the process of this type of event as well as many of the problems that face the open science community. Jo’s highlight of the podcast was a conversation between current Innovation officer at eLife, Emmy Tsang, and the past officer, Naomi Penfold. They discussed their experiences hosting the Sprint, and to commented on changes they have witnessed in the open science movement. Listeners to the podcast will notice the overarching themes of openness, collaboration, excitement, and hope for the future of science, while also being challenged to think about who is being left behind in the progress towards a more open world. You can hear the full podcast (and see pictures from the Sprint) here, or listen on Soundcloud here.
“I supported them but really this was made by two scientists who had zero experience in this and I think making this in 2 days is really quite impressive!” – Jo Barratt, OKF
The OKF team would like to thank Emmy and eLife for a great experience at the Sprint!

Part of the Open Knowledge Foundation team met up in Cambridge the day before the Sprint began, and saved the world from a meteor (at an escape room)!

Women in data can help tackle gender inequality

- September 10, 2019 in data literacy, Events, gender, News

Encouraging more women and girls to learn data skills can help tackle gender inequality and build a more diverse society, a conference will hear today. Speaking at the annual ‘Doing Data Right’ conference in Edinburgh, Open Knowledge Foundation chief executive Catherine Stihler will call on governments to do more to engage young women in data skills, particularly outwith maths and science. She will argue that this will help empower more women to use data to improve their local communities, their cities and their countries. Former MEP for Scotland Ms Stihler will call for more citizen-generated data through schools, libraries, churches and community groups to generate high-quality data relating to gender equality and diversity, as well as other issues such as air quality and climate action. Ms Stihler is speaking at The Scotsman conference, Doing Data Right: Through people and partnerships, on a panel on ‘Women in data’ – along with campaigner and writer Caroline Criado Perez, Gillian Hogg of Heriot-Watt University, and Talat Yaqoob of Equate Scotland. Speaking ahead of the event, Open Knowledge Foundation chief executive Catherine Stihler said:
“Governments across the world must work harder to give everyone access to key information and the ability to use it to understand and shape their lives, building a fair, free and open future. “Without data skills, people will be ill-equipped to take on many jobs of the future. “We need to encourage more women and girls to learn data skills, particularly outwith subjects such as maths and science.

“These skills will then pave the way for pioneering new ways of producing and harnessing citizen-generated data through schools, libraries, churches and community groups, which in turn can help tackle gender inequality, build a more diverse society, and address issues such as climate change and air quality.”

Women in data can help tackle gender inequality

- September 10, 2019 in data literacy, Events, gender, News

Encouraging more women and girls to learn data skills can help tackle gender inequality and build a more diverse society, a conference will hear today. Speaking at the annual ‘Doing Data Right’ conference in Edinburgh, Open Knowledge Foundation chief executive Catherine Stihler will call on governments to do more to engage young women in data skills, particularly outwith maths and science. She will argue that this will help empower more women to use data to improve their local communities, their cities and their countries. Former MEP for Scotland Ms Stihler will call for more citizen-generated data through schools, libraries, churches and community groups to generate high-quality data relating to gender equality and diversity, as well as other issues such as air quality and climate action. Ms Stihler is speaking at The Scotsman conference, Doing Data Right: Through people and partnerships, on a panel on ‘Women in data’ – along with campaigner and writer Caroline Criado Perez, Gillian Hogg of Heriot-Watt University, and Talat Yaqoob of Equate Scotland. Speaking ahead of the event, Open Knowledge Foundation chief executive Catherine Stihler said:
“Governments across the world must work harder to give everyone access to key information and the ability to use it to understand and shape their lives, building a fair, free and open future. “Without data skills, people will be ill-equipped to take on many jobs of the future. “We need to encourage more women and girls to learn data skills, particularly outwith subjects such as maths and science.

“These skills will then pave the way for pioneering new ways of producing and harnessing citizen-generated data through schools, libraries, churches and community groups, which in turn can help tackle gender inequality, build a more diverse society, and address issues such as climate change and air quality.”

First decade of Open Data in Finland -events 8.-10.10.

- June 12, 2019 in Events, Featured

Come celebrate the first decade of open data in Finland with Open Knowledge Finland and Helsinki Region Infoshare, 8th to 10th October 2019! Participate in three days of workshops and events culminating in a celebration at the Helsinki City Hall. Tuesday 8.10.2019 Location: Maria 01 startup center, Helsinki 12-13 Lunch at Starter (own cost) 13-21: Presentations and workshops Please sign up to the workshops beforehand, as attendance is limited. https://forms.gle/qgn9FH243DzrF4Ss7   Wednesday 9.10.2019 Location: Kuntatalo, Helsinki   Thursday 10.10.2019 Location: Helsinki City Hall Time: 12-16 + drinks Highlights from the 10 years of Finland’s journey into open data. Meet the makers, the deciders, the inventors, the creators, and the experts! Programme and speakers will be published here shortly. Be part of mapping out the next 10 years of Finland’s open data adventure, and stay for drinks and networking after 4pm.   Please sign up for the gala event. https://forms.gle/uZ2sKYUnhNjHweZh7 The post First decade of Open Data in Finland -events 8.-10.10. appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

FairBNB kickoff!

- May 27, 2019 in Events, Featured

Do you want to be involved in launching and developing a short-stay rental platform that really complies with the principles of a fair, non-extractive and collaborative economy? WELCOME TO MARIA01 (CORNER ROOM) TUESDAY 4.6 AT 19:00 TO THE KICK-OFF EVENT OF The Fairbnb.coop journey started in 2016 as a movement seeking to create an alternative to existing home-sharing platforms with a focus on commons and 100% respectful with legality. The first hotspots were Venice and Amsterdam but soon other groups from all over Europe joined the debate and helped us shaping the final model that we are seeking to implement. In late 2018 we created a co-op to be the legal entity behind a fair, collectively-owned and transparent booking platform. A platfrom that will allow travelers to find lawful accommodations while facilitating meaningful travel and community participation and which will reinvest 50% of its revenue to support local communities.

Why Fair?

+We’re transparent. We share our data with local governments so cities can know the real impact of tourism.
+ We’re compliant with local regulation and complement them with suggestions of additional policies by local communities.
+ 1 host – 1 home policy. We avoid multi-host in the platform, to ease the effect of over-tourism over the residential accommodation.

Why a Co-op?

+We are independent. Our platform is owned not by faceless investors but by those who use it and are impacted by its use
+Co-ownership + Co-Governance. Decisions are made collaboratively under a distributed governance.
+We are community centered. In order to rebuild communities, 50% of profits are reinvested in social projects that counter the negative effects of tourism.

Why Community Centered?

  • We foster local economies: Half of the commission charged by Fairbnb is returned to the local community, sustaining projects selected by local residents.
  • Local nodes are at the center of our organization and represent the engine that connect the people in the territories making human interaction the real “technology” of Fairbnb.coop
We are bringing bringing the fairbnb cooperative to Finland and setting up a local node. We are looking for people who can help build the network, the platform, find hosts to join the platform and projects to be funded through the commission charged by fairbnb and help with the crowdfunding campaign. Please join us on this journey – This is collective action that can really change things in our cities! Sign up at: FB event  Meetup For more information check out these links:
https://fairbnb.coop/get-involved/
https://www.facebook.com/Fairbnbcoop/ The post FairBNB kickoff! appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Open Knowledge Night: Disinformation and fact checking with Faktabaari

- April 25, 2019 in Events, Featured

How can investigative journalism and data tools work together? If you’re interested in using data analytics skills, learning about tools used in journalism and data journalism, or just understanding how mis- and disinformation can be detected, this evening is for you!
OKFI and Faktabaari are organising this event together!
Date: Tuesday, May 7th
Time: 5pm onwards
Place: Päivälehden museo, Helsinki Sign up at Meetup.com (link to appear shortly) Starting this spring, fact checking service Faktabaari focuses more on carrying out investigations against online disinformation. To make it possible, tools are needed. Faktabaari has acquired Trendolizer for finding out what is trending on the web and for tracking sources. Trendolizer is a creation of Belgian fact checking wizard Maarten Schenk, also behind fact checking site Lead Stories. Faktabaari also has requested access for a platform of the European Observatory against Disinformation. The platform is based on Truly Media which is co-developed by ATC and Deutsche Welle and verification tool TruthNest. These kind of tools have been acquired primarily because of EU elections, but it is good to look beyond them. Fact check, investigative journalism and data experts will certainly have common interests, they just have to find them. Tentative program:
  • Short introduction to fact checking and related tools
  • Knowledge crystals as potential tools for crowdsourced fact checking
  • Data analytics and open data tools for fact checking
  • Networking and idea generation
The post Open Knowledge Night: Disinformation and fact checking with Faktabaari appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.