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Miniatures from a 12th-century Medical and Herbal Collection

- January 26, 2017 in flora, herbal, herbals, medicine, plants

Wonderful series of miniatures from a late 12th-century herbal with delightfully abstract depictions of plants including Cannabis), and a variety of medieval medical procedures, such as cauterization and the removal of haemorrhoids.

Miniatures from a 12th-century Medical and Herbal Collection

- January 26, 2017 in flora, herbal, herbals, medicine, plants

Wonderful series of miniatures from a late 12th-century herbal with delightfully abstract depictions of plants including Cannabis), and a variety of medieval medical procedures, such as cauterization and the removal of haemorrhoids.

Miniatures from a 12th-century Medical and Herbal Collection

- January 26, 2017 in flora, herbal, herbals, medicine, plants

Wonderful series of miniatures from a late 12th-century herbal with delightfully abstract depictions of plants including Cannabis), and a variety of medieval medical procedures, such as cauterization and the removal of haemorrhoids.

Miniatures from a 12th-century Medical and Herbal Collection

- January 26, 2017 in flora, herbal, herbals, medicine, plants

Wonderful series of miniatures from a late 12th-century herbal with delightfully abstract depictions of plants including Cannabis), and a variety of medieval medical procedures, such as cauterization and the removal of haemorrhoids.

Festive Greetings and 2016 in review

- December 28, 2016 in 2016, adrian, denis, eugene, Events, flora, ingo, OGP Ireland, Open Knowledge Ireland, salua, shawn

Our warm festive greetings to all friends of Open Knowledge – For the last two years we have been advocating that for open data to make a difference in lives of people it has to be put in use. Open data must be seen as a digital public infrastructure. It must be permanent, linkable and trustful. In the last year we organised and participated in events, tried out new technologies and demonstrated usefulness of open data. Here are some things we did in 2016 to spread this message.   In January, in collaboration with Wikimedia Ireland, we discussed how open health data can save lives and help all of us to make better-informed decisions about health matters. Featured speakers: Round Up Our Slides   In March  Open Government Partnership Mid-term report on the progress with National Action Plan was launched In May we presented Hospital Waiting List project and spoke about importance of preservation of open knowledge for future generations at Knowledge for Health conference  , organised by the Institute of Public Health    In June we held a discussion dedicated to preservation of knowledge created today for generations of the future. 18 Speakers and panelists included:
  • Dr. Rufus Pollock, founder of Open Knowledge International
  • Stanislav Nazarenko, Open Knowledge Ireland core team member and the founder of Nihonto Club, an online community dedicated to appreciation and preservation of Japanese swords and the largest public database of Japanese metalwork artists
  • Dr. Kalpana Shankar, Head of School of Information and Communication Studies, University College Dublin
Photos   In July we were invited to the Isle of Man to share our open data experiences at  #offcamp unconference. We took this opportunity to highlight importance of trust in data. 160730-OffCamp-155 Photos   In September we contributed to the second Irish Open Government Partnership National Action Plan. Our submissions are here   In October we co organised with the Institute of Public Health half-day workshop dedicated to “Open Access: Tackling Health Inequalities”. Best international practices and opportunities which arise from technological advances for making knowledge universally fair, accessible, interoperable and reusable were discussed.   In November our colleague Dr. Ingo Keck delivered a presentation on open data challenges and raised questions about open data sustainability at the event dedicated to the World Usability Day in Berlin.
“Open Data has to be seen in the context of empowering citizens to do informed decisions. Without information, citizen can not decide in an informed way who to vote for, so democracy can not work without open information. But open data is not a cause in itself. It also means that people must be able to understand the data easily, be able to access it without problems and can work with it. Only then people will realise the importance of open data and only then will „opening up“ data be sustainable. Open Data, Usability and Sustainability therefore can not be separated.”

What we are planning to do in 2017? We are going to focus on Healthcare data and planning to run 4 events with support of  DPER’s Open Data Engagement plan and continue to demonstrate….. We have a long to go until Open Data will become a digital public infrastructure: permanent, linked and secure. This infrastructure needs to be designed, built and maintained, which require human and financial resources. Open data must be findable, accessible, interoperable and findable in order to help a real person to make decisions on daily basis. ———– Many thanks to Open Knowledge Ireland colleagues: Flora, Salua, Ingo, Adrian, Shawn, Stan, Eugene and Denis Special Thanks to all supporters and collaborators: TCube, the Science Gallery We wish you happy Christmas and the very best in 2017!

Sex and Science in Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora

- March 11, 2015 in Art & Illustrations, Books, botanical illustrations, botany, Carl Linnaeus, Erasmus Darwin, Featured Articles, flora, flowers, Painting, poetry, robert thornton, Science & Medicine, sex, temple of flora

Bridal beds, blushing captives, and swollen trunks - Carl Linnaeus' taxonomy of plants heralded a whole new era in 18th-century Europe of plants being spoken of in sexualised terms. Martin Kemp explores how this association between the floral and erotic reached its visual zenith in Robert Thornton's exquisitely illustrated Temple of Flora.

Plates from Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora (1807)

- November 8, 2012 in collections, flora, flowers, Images, Images-19th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Landscapes, Images-Painting, Images-Science, robert thornton, temple of flora

“The Temple of Flora” is the third and final part of Robert John Thornton’s New illustration of the sexual system of Carolus von Linnaeus, considered by many to be the greatest of all flower books. It consists of a series of sumptuous depictions of flowers notable for their epic and unusual settings. Interwoven amongst the images are various descriptions, histories and poetic odes regarding the flowers featured. The first plates were engraved by Thomas Medland in May 1798 from paintings by Philip Reinagle. Between 1798 and 1807 they produced a total of thirty-three coloured plates, engraved in aquatint, stipple and line. Others engravers included Joseph Constantine Stadler working from the painting of Peter Charles Henderson. When he planned the project, Thornton had decided to publish seventy folio-size plates. Lack of interest from the general public spelled disaster for the scheme, and the holding of a lottery could not save it from financial ruin, neither did a page in the work dedicated to the spouse of George III, Queen Charlotte, patroness of botany and the fine arts. (Wikipedia) (All images taken from New illustration of the sexual system of Carolus von Linnaeus (1807) housed at the Internet Archive, donated by Missouri [...]

Hortus Malabaricus (1678-1693)

- July 13, 2012 in botany, flora, Hendrik van Rheede, Images, Images-17th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Science, india, Kerala, netherlands, non-article, plant anatomy

Selected illustrations from the stunning Hortus Malabaricus (Garden of Malabar), an epic treatise dealing with the medicinal properties of the flora in the Indian state of Kerala. Originally written in Latin, it was compiled over a period of nearly 30 years and published in Amsterdam between 1678 and 1693 in 12 volumes of about 500 pages each, with a total of 794 copper plate engravings. The book was conceived by Hendrik van Rheede, who was the Governor of Dutch Malabar at the time, and he is said to have taken a keen personal interest in the compilation. The work was edited by a team of nearly a hundred including physicians (such as Ranga Bhat, Vinayaka Pandit, Appu Bhat and Itti Achuden) professors of medicine and botany, amateur botanists (such as Arnold Seyn, Theodore Jansson of Almeloveen, Paul Hermann, Johannes Munnicks, Joannes Commelinus, Abraham a Poot), and technicians, illustrators and engravers, together with the collaboration of company officials, clergymen (D. John Caesarius and the Discalced Carmelite Mathaeus of St. Joseph’s Monastery at Varapuzha). Van Rheede was also assisted by the King of Cochin and the ruling Zamorin of Calicut. Prominent among the Indian contributors were three Gouda Saraswat Brahmins named Ranga Bhat, Vinayaka Pandit,Appu Bhat and Malayali physician, Itti Achuden, who was an Ezhava doctor of the Mouton Coast of Malabar. The book has been translated into English and Malayalam by Dr. K. S. Manilal. (Wikipedia)

(All images from the Biodiversity Heritage Library who house scans of all 12 volumes from the Missouri Botanical Garden Library. You can also find them on the Internet Archive).











































































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