You are browsing the archive for floral.

Plants and Their Application to Ornament (1896)

- April 25, 2019 in decoration, design, Eugène Grasset, floral, flowers, graphic design

Eugène Grasset's wonderful pictorial summation of his key ideas about natural forms and decorative motifs.

The Magic Roses (1906)

- June 2, 2016 in early film, early special effects, floral, flowers, Georges Méliès, magic, magician, roses, Segundo Chomón, trick film

A film by the pioneering Spanish film director, cinematographer and screenwriter Segundo Chomón.

The Magic Roses (1906)

- June 2, 2016 in early film, early special effects, floral, flowers, Georges Méliès, magic, magician, roses, Segundo Chomón, trick film

A film by the pioneering Spanish film director, cinematographer and screenwriter Segundo Chomón.

The Magic Roses (1906)

- June 2, 2016 in early film, early special effects, floral, flowers, Georges Méliès, magic, magician, roses, Segundo Chomón, trick film

A film by the pioneering Spanish film director, cinematographer and screenwriter Segundo Chomón.

Watercolours from a 16th-Century De Materia Medica

- September 15, 2015 in floral, flowers, herbal medicine, herbals, medicine, pharmacopoeias, plants

Wonderful full-page watercolour illustrations from a 16th-century edition of Pedanius Dioscorides's work on herbal medicine, De Materia Medica.

Watercolours from a 16th-Century De Materia Medica

- September 15, 2015 in floral, flowers, herbal medicine, herbals, medicine, pharmacopoeias, plants

Wonderful full-page watercolour illustrations from a 16th-century edition of Pedanius Dioscorides's work on herbal medicine, De Materia Medica.

Skeleton Leaves (1873)

- February 5, 2013 in boston, collections, floral, Images, Images-19th, Images-Photography, john p. soule, leaves, Library of Congress, skeleton leaves, wreaths

A series of elaborate “skeleton leaf” arrangements, from the photographic studios of John P. Soule which stood on Washington Street in Boston from 1861 to 1882. As well as producing many pictures of Boston’s buildings, notable events (such as the 1869 National Peace Jubilee and the great fire of 1872), carte-de-visite portraits etc., Soule also produced these so called “Skeleton Leaves”. As well as comprising wreath shapes and crosses the leaves also served as elaborate frames for the portraits of individuals which were sometimes embedded within them. The process of drying out leaves in such a way was very popular at the time, with whole books being published that were devoted to the subject such as Phantom Flowers, a treatise on the art of producing skeleton leaves (1864). (All images from the Library of Congress). SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription! Name: E-mail:

A Floral Fantasy in an Old English Garden (1899)

- May 10, 2012 in floral, flowers, garden, non-article, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Childrens, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction, Texts: Miscellaneous, Texts: Picturebooks, Texts: Poetry, walter crane


A Floral Fantasy in an Old English Garden, set forth in verses & coloured designs, by Walter Crane; 1899; Harper, London

Walter Crane (1845–1915) is considered to be the most prolific and influential children’s book creator of his generation and, along with Randolph Caldecott and Kate Greenaway, one of the strongest contributors to the child’s nursery motif that the genre of English children’s illustrated literature would exhibit in its developmental stages in the latter 19th century. His work featured some of the more colourful and detailed beginnings of the child-in-the-garden motifs that would characterize many nursery rhymes and children’s stories for decades to come. (Wikipedia)

Open Library link










Sign up to the PDR to get new articles delivered free to your inbox and to receive updates about exciting new developments relating to the project. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

flattr this!