You are browsing the archive for folktales.

British Goblins: Welsh Folk-lore, Fairy Mythology, Legends and Traditions (1880)

Adam Green - June 12, 2018 in elves, fairies, fairy tales, fairytales, folk tales, folklore, folktales, ghosts, goblins, myth, wales, welsh fairies

Wirt Sikes, US consul to Cardiff from 1876 to 1883, describes the mythology and traditions of Wales, a land steeped in folklore.

Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio (1880)

Adam Green - November 14, 2017 in china, chinese literature, fairytales, folklore, folktales, ghosts, spirits

First English translation of Pu Songling's collection of classical Chinese stories, including magical pear trees, thimble-sized babies, ghostly cities, and mean spirited daughters-in-law being turned into pigs.

Forty-Four Turkish Fairy Tales (1913)

Adam Green - December 13, 2016 in dew, fairy tales, fairytales, folklore, folktales, turkey, turkish fairytales

In this elaborately produced volume, beautifully illustrated by Willy Pogany, Hungarian-born linguist Ignác Kúnos presents 44 folktales from Turkey, including princesses, dragons, wizards, witches, and horses that can fly.

Forty-Four Turkish Fairy Tales (1913)

Adam Green - December 13, 2016 in dew, fairy tales, fairytales, folklore, folktales, turkey, turkish fairytales

In this elaborately produced volume, beautifully illustrated by Willy Pogany, Hungarian-born linguist Ignác Kúnos presents 44 folktales from Turkey, including princesses, dragons, wizards, witches, and horses that can fly.

Forty-Four Turkish Fairy Tales (1913)

Adam Green - December 13, 2016 in dew, fairy tales, fairytales, folklore, folktales, turkey, turkish fairytales

In this elaborately produced volume, beautifully illustrated by Willy Pogany, Hungarian-born linguist Ignác Kúnos presents 44 folktales from Turkey, including princesses, dragons, wizards, witches, and horses that can fly.

Forty-Four Turkish Fairy Tales (1913)

Adam Green - December 13, 2016 in dew, fairy tales, fairytales, folklore, folktales, turkey, turkish fairytales

In this elaborately produced volume, beautifully illustrated by Willy Pogany, Hungarian-born linguist Ignác Kúnos presents 44 folktales from Turkey, including princesses, dragons, wizards, witches, and horses that can fly.

Croatian Tales of Long Ago (1922)

Adam Green - February 7, 2013 in collections, croatia, fairytales, folktales, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction

Croatian Tales of Long Ago, by Ivana Brlić-Mažuranić, translated by F. S. Copeland; 1922; Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. A seminal collection of short stories by the acclaimed children’s author Ivana Brlić-Mažuranić originally published in 1916 in Zagreb by the Matica Hrvatska publishing house. The collection is considered her masterpiece and it features a series of newly written fairy tales heavily inspired by motifs taken from ancient Slavic mythology of pre-Christian Croatia. Due to this way of combining original fantasy plots with folk mythology, Brlić-Mažuranić’s writing style has been compared by literary critics to Hans Christian Andersen and J. R. R. Tolkien. Indeed, the 1922 English translation by F.S. Copeland was published in London by George Allen & Unwin, the same company which would go onto publish Tolkien’s The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings trilogy. The illustrations in this 1922 edition are by Croatian artist Vladimir Kirin. (Wikipedia) The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the Boston Public Library. Hat-tip to Pinterest user Pensive Blackbird. DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote [...]

Russian Fairytales (1915)

Adam Green - October 2, 2012 in collections, fairytales, folktales, russia, texts, Texts: 20th, Texts: Fairytales

Russian fairy tales from the Russian of Polevoi, by R. Nisbet Bain, illustrated by Noel L. Nisbet; 1915; Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. A collection of Russian fairytales translated from the Russian of Nikolai Polevoy, a notable editor, writer, translator in the early 19th century. The translations were made by Robert Nisbet Bain, a British historian who worked for the British Museum, and a polyglot who could reportedly speak over twenty languages fluently. He famously taught himself Hungarian in order that he could read the works of Mór Jókai in the original after first reading him in German, going on to become the most prolific translator into English from Hungarian in the nineteenth century. The book is housed at the Internet Archive, donated by the Boston Public Library. Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

Navaho Legends (1897)

Adam Green - June 28, 2012 in american indian, folklore, folktales, legends, myths, native americans, navaho, non-article, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction

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Navaho Legends, edited by G.E. Stechert; 1897; American Folk-Lore Society, New York

Book from the American Folk-Lore Society compiling Navaho myths and legends and including also a lengthy introduction on the history, beliefs and customs of the Navaho people.

I. THE STORY OF THE EMERGENCE.

136. At To‘bIllhaskI’di (in the middle of the first world), white arose in the east, and they regarded it as day there, they say ; blue rose in the south, and still it was day to them, and they moved around ; yellow rose in the west and showed that evening had come ; then dark arose in the north, and they lay down and slept.

137. At To‘bIllhaskI’di water flowed out (from a central source) in different directions ; one stream flowed to the east, another to the south, and another to the west. There were dwelling-places on the border of the stream that flowed to the east, on that which flowed to the south, and on that which flowed to the west also.


Open Library link




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    Aino Folktales (1888)

    Adam Green - April 13, 2012 in aino, folklore, folktales, japan, non-article, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Fairytales, Texts: Fiction


    Aino Folk-tales, by B.H. Chamberlain; 1888; Folk-lore Society, London.

    The Ainu (アイヌ?), also called Aynu, Aino (アイノ), and in historical texts Ezo (蝦夷), are a group of indigenous people living in Japan and Russia – thought to originate from the Jōmon-jin people whom many think might have been the first to settle North America. Historically, they spoke the Ainu language and related varieties and lived in Hokkaidō, the Kuril Islands, and much of Sakhalin. A medieval Chinese historian referred to the Ainu region as the “Land of the Hairy Men” on account of the abundance of their facial hair compared to the typical inhabitant of Japan.

    Open Library link










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