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Open data day : Towards Clean Air with Open Data!

- March 5, 2018 in air quality, airquality, Civic Lab, Events, General, InfluencAir, Open Belgium, Open Data, Open Data Day

    On Saturday 3rd March took place the Open Data Day, for the occasion, no less than 355 events occurred around the globe. One of them, “Towards Clean Air with Open Data!”, happened in BeCentral in Brussels. During the morning, 8 talks on open air quality data were given by citizens, experts, students and entrepreneurs. They talked about different initiatives in Belgium, the effects on health of air pollution, and more. You can find the links to the slides of the presentations below, also, everything was recorded so the talks will be available soon on our Youtube Channel. In the afternoon, two workshops were given:
  • Analyzing and visualizing open air quality data
  • Build your own sensor
The first one lasted around two hours, it was given by Dominik Rubo who knows a lot about open air quality data analysis and visualization. By the end of the workshop, people were able to extract the data provided by the sensors, analyse it and visualize it. If you’re interested, you can find the github link to do it yourself here. The second one, given by Yannick Verbelen and Pieter Van der Vennet, aimed at teaching people how to build their own sensor so they would only need to plug it in at home to be operational. Thanks to this workshop, they managed to build 22 sensors that are probably collecting data now. We expect that more and more workshops of this kind will take place in different cities so we will have a better understanding of air quality in Belgium. You couldn’t come at the workshop and you can’t wait to build your own sensor? Here is a complete tutorial with resources to order the pieces and build it at home! The event finished on a cold beer in the end of the afternoon to relax after this extensive program. It is awesome to see the dedication people put in such project during their free time. The success of such event is a good indicator that open air quality data has a bright future in Belgium.   If you want to actively join the movement, Civic Lab Brussels members work on air quality measurements every other Tuesday. Join our meetup page to learn more about it! We are looking for technical and non-technical people, so come as you are whatever your skills are. The next coming event is Open Belgium 2018, it will take place in Louvain-la-Neuve on the 12th March. If you are interested not only in air quality but in open data in general, you will definitely enjoy it. Don’t hesitate to visit the website to learn more about it and book your ticket!   Resources: Presentations’ slides:    

Open data day : Towards Clean Air with Open Data!

- March 5, 2018 in air quality, airquality, Civic Lab, Events, General, InfluencAir, Open Belgium, Open Data, Open Data Day

    On Saturday 3rd March took place the Open Data Day, for the occasion, no less than 355 events occurred around the globe. One of them, “Towards Clean Air with Open Data!”, happened in BeCentral in Brussels. During the morning, 8 talks on open air quality data were given by citizens, experts, students and entrepreneurs. They talked about different initiatives in Belgium, the effects on health of air pollution, and more. You can find the links to the slides of the presentations below, also, everything was recorded so the talks will be available soon on our Youtube Channel. In the afternoon, two workshops were given:
  • Analyzing and visualizing open air quality data
  • Build your own sensor
The first one lasted around two hours, it was given by Dominik Rubo who knows a lot about open air quality data analysis and visualization. By the end of the workshop, people were able to extract the data provided by the sensors, analyse it and visualize it. If you’re interested, you can find the github link to do it yourself here. The second one, given by Yannick Verbelen and Pieter Van der Vennet, aimed at teaching people how to build their own sensor so they would only need to plug it in at home to be operational. Thanks to this workshop, they managed to build 22 sensors that are probably collecting data now. We expect that more and more workshops of this kind will take place in different cities so we will have a better understanding of air quality in Belgium. You couldn’t come at the workshop and you can’t wait to build your own sensor? Here is a complete tutorial with resources to order the pieces and build it at home! The event finished on a cold beer in the end of the afternoon to relax after this extensive program. It is awesome to see the dedication people put in such project during their free time. The success of such event is a good indicator that open air quality data has a bright future in Belgium.   If you want to actively join the movement, Civic Lab Brussels members work on air quality measurements every other Tuesday. Join our meetup page to learn more about it! We are looking for technical and non-technical people, so come as you are whatever your skills are. The next coming event is Open Belgium 2018, it will take place in Louvain-la-Neuve on the 12th March. If you are interested not only in air quality but in open data in general, you will definitely enjoy it. Don’t hesitate to visit the website to learn more about it and book your ticket!   Resources: Presentations’ slides:    

Open Knowledge Belgium is preparing for open Summer of code 2017

- May 31, 2017 in belgium, Civic Labs, Events, General, Open Belgium, Open Data, Open Knowledge, open Summer of code, oSoc17

In the last few months, the open community in Belgium has had the chance to gather multiple times. Open Knowledge Belgium organised a couple of events and activities which aimed to bring its passionate community together and facilitate the launch of new projects. Furthermore, as summertime is coming, it’s currently organising the seventh edition of its yearly open Summer of code. Let’s go chronologically through what’s going on at Open Knowledge Belgium.

Open Belgium 2017

As the tradition goes, the first Monday after International Open Data Day, Open Knowledge Belgium organises its Open Belgium conference on open knowledge and open data in Belgium.

Open Belgium was made possible by an incredible group of volunteers

This year’s community-driven gathering of open enthusiasts took place in Brussels for the first time and was a big success. More than 250 people with different backgrounds showed up to talk about the current state of and next steps towards more open knowledge and open data in Belgium.

All presentations, notes and visuals of Open Belgium are available on http://2017.openbelgium.be/presentations.

Launch of Civic Lab Brussels

It all started during a fruitful discussion with Open Knowledge Germany at Open Belgium. While talking about the 26 OK Labs in Germany, more specifically being intrigued by the air quality project of OK Lab Stuttgart, we got to ask ourselves: why wouldn’t we launch something similar in Brussels/Belgium?

In about the same period of time, some new open initiatives popped up from within our community and several volunteers repeatedly expressed their interest to contribute to Open Knowledge’s mission of building a world in which knowledge creates power for the many, not the few.

Eventually, after a wonderful visit to BeCentral — the new digital hub above Brussels’ central station — all pieces of the puzzle got merged into the idea of a Civic Lab: bringing volunteers and open projects every 2 weeks together in an open space.

The goal of Civic Labs Brussels is two-fold: on the one hand, offering volunteers opportunities to contribute to civic projects they care about. On the other hand, providing initiative-takers of open project with help and advice from fellow citizens.

Open in the case of our Civic Lab means, corresponding to the Open Definition, yet slightly shorter, that anyone can freely contribute to and benefit from the project. No strings attached.

Civic Lab meetups are not only to put open initiatives in the picture and hang out with other civic innovators. They’re also about getting things done and creating impact. Therefore, those gatherings always take place under the same format of short introductory presentations (30 min) — to both new and ongoing projects — followed by action (2 hours), whereby all attendees are totally free to contribute to the project of their choice and can come up with new projects.

Open Summer of code 2017

Last but not least, Open Knowledge Belgium is preparing for the seventh edition of its annual open Summer of code. From 3rd until 27th July, 36 programming, design and communications students will be working under the guidance of experienced coaches on 10 different open innovation projects with real-life impact.

If you want to stay updated about open Summer of code and all other activities, please follow Open Knowledge Belgium on Twitter or subscribe to its newsletter.

Open Knowledge Belgium is preparing for open Summer of code 2017

- May 31, 2017 in belgium, Civic Labs, Events, General, Open Belgium, Open Data, Open Knowledge, open Summer of code, oSoc17

In the last few months, the open community in Belgium has had the chance to gather multiple times. Open Knowledge Belgium organised a couple of events and activities which aimed to bring its passionate community together and facilitate the launch of new projects. Furthermore, as summertime is coming, it’s currently organising the seventh edition of its yearly open Summer of code. Let’s go chronologically through what’s going on at Open Knowledge Belgium.

Open Belgium 2017

As the tradition goes, the first Monday after International Open Data Day, Open Knowledge Belgium organises its Open Belgium conference on open knowledge and open data in Belgium.

Open Belgium was made possible by an incredible group of volunteers

This year’s community-driven gathering of open enthusiasts took place in Brussels for the first time and was a big success. More than 250 people with different backgrounds showed up to talk about the current state of and next steps towards more open knowledge and open data in Belgium.

All presentations, notes and visuals of Open Belgium are available on http://2017.openbelgium.be/presentations.

Launch of Civic Lab Brussels

It all started during a fruitful discussion with Open Knowledge Germany at Open Belgium. While talking about the 26 OK Labs in Germany, more specifically being intrigued by the air quality project of OK Lab Stuttgart, we got to ask ourselves: why wouldn’t we launch something similar in Brussels/Belgium?

In about the same period of time, some new open initiatives popped up from within our community and several volunteers repeatedly expressed their interest to contribute to Open Knowledge’s mission of building a world in which knowledge creates power for the many, not the few.

Eventually, after a wonderful visit to BeCentral — the new digital hub above Brussels’ central station — all pieces of the puzzle got merged into the idea of a Civic Lab: bringing volunteers and open projects every 2 weeks together in an open space.

The goal of Civic Labs Brussels is two-fold: on the one hand, offering volunteers opportunities to contribute to civic projects they care about. On the other hand, providing initiative-takers of open project with help and advice from fellow citizens.

Open in the case of our Civic Lab means, corresponding to the Open Definition, yet slightly shorter, that anyone can freely contribute to and benefit from the project. No strings attached.

Civic Lab meetups are not only to put open initiatives in the picture and hang out with other civic innovators. They’re also about getting things done and creating impact. Therefore, those gatherings always take place under the same format of short introductory presentations (30 min) — to both new and ongoing projects — followed by action (2 hours), whereby all attendees are totally free to contribute to the project of their choice and can come up with new projects.

Open Summer of code 2017

Last but not least, Open Knowledge Belgium is preparing for the seventh edition of its annual open Summer of code. From 3rd until 27th July, 36 programming, design and communications students will be working under the guidance of experienced coaches on 10 different open innovation projects with real-life impact.

If you want to stay updated about open Summer of code and all other activities, please follow Open Knowledge Belgium on Twitter or subscribe to its newsletter.

Here I am; excited to take up the challenge at Open Knowledge Belgium

- October 31, 2016 in employee, Featured, General, open knowledge belgium

Yihaa, I’m very happy to have recently joined Open Knowledge Belgium as its new project coordinator. Being the successor of driving force Pieter-Jan won’t be an easy job, but I am looking forward to working together with the Open Knowledge community and its partners on bringing Open Knowledge and Open Data in Belgium, as part of the international movement, to new heights.

As Pieter-Jan and I aren’t identical twin brothers, some things are going to slightly change as a result of my appointment. Hence, a quick update with my intentions as well some expected changes in the coming months.

My belief: Open Knowledge and Open Data for a better and more sustainable future

With previous experiences in data modelling, civic engagement and crowdsourcing, I have developed a keen interest in open innovation and the power of many intrinsically motivated individuals contributing to projects with social and societal impact, serving the interests of the many rather than the happy few. However I do have plenty of room to learn, especially on the more technical side (currently taking a MOOC on Linked Data Engineering), I’m more than ready to take up the challenge and start working on projects, which are often, at the crossroads of public interest and private initiative.

My curious mind, some may even call it childish curiosity, makes me interested in many different things, but my main interest goes nowadays to ways open knowledge and open data can contribute to smart mobility solutions; more specifically, urban cycling; as part of the strong tendency towards more liveable cities. In the last few months I have been on a bike tour through Northern and Eastern Europe and had the opportunity to meet civic innovators working on, mostly community-driven, solutions to tackle local challenges. As I’m inspired by this rise of urban cycling movements all over the world and bike data projects like the one in the city of Riga, I’d like to further explore bike data and ultimately provide cities with smart cycling insights on safety, infrastructure and accessibility.

I have made a non-exhaustive list of existing initiatives to encourage urban cycling; please feel free to add other initiatives you know.

Another aspiration of mine is to help build, in preferably multiple Belgian cities, a civic hacking culture. A logical first step would be to gather passionate urban innovators (all backgrounds welcome) and work on a regular basis together on open source civic tech projects, get feedback from tech and government experts and learn about civic innovation and related concepts like open data, smart cities and open government.

The biweekly OK Labs in Stuttgart and weekly civic hack nights in San Francisco might be good starting points; let me know if you know other examples.

Other project coordinator, same open events

To put things clearly: all support to all Belgian Open Knowledge working groups as well as both events Open Belgium and open Summer of code can go on without any interruption.

In fact, even more correctly, we are even more ambitious than ever before and aim at gathering 300 attendees at our yearly community-driven Open Belgium conference, on the 6th of March 2017 in Brussels, in order to discuss open knowledge and open data efforts in Belgium. Last week we launched our open call for speakers — all proposals are welcome.

Office in Brussels

As it’s Open Knowledge Belgium’s clear objective to unify efforts all over the country, we will move our office from Ghent to Brussels. Don’t get me wrong: Ghent is and will always be an important place for our community, but we hope to expand our community and create new opportunities by moving to the center of the country. Hence, we’re currently looking for a new office space in Brussels, preferably near a railway station to make it as easy as possible for our community to gather. If you have any suggestions in mind, let us know.

Belgium as part of the international movement

Open Knowledge Belgium is, as a local chapter part of Open Knowledge International, part of a global movement to create open knowledge. Therefore, I also consider it as one of my priorities to connect with other country representatives, learn from their best practices and failures and let them hear about what we’re doing.

And yes, we can still learn from other countries: although Belgium has been moving up the ladder in the last few years, it was ranked at #35 in the 2015 Open Data Index with a score of 43% (39% the previous year) and considered as a follower by the European Data Portal.

Let me hear from you

As project & community coordinator, I’m there to assist the Belgian Open Knowledge community and its different working groups and partners. If you have any questions, proposals or whatever you want to talk about, please get in touch with me via dries@openknowledge.be or ping me on Twitter @DVRansbeeck or @OpenKnowledgeBE.

Please mark Friday the 25th of November in your agenda. Then we’ll have a farewell drink for Pieter-Jan as our fulltime community coordinator and a welcome drink for me as the new one. A perfect opportunity to get to know each other — see you there? And, oh yeah, drinks are on us! Simply register via https://opendrinks.eventbrite.nl/.

Here I am; excited to take up the challenge at Open Knowledge Belgium

- October 31, 2016 in employee, Featured, General, open knowledge belgium

Yihaa, I’m very happy to have recently joined Open Knowledge Belgium as its new project coordinator. Being the successor of driving force Pieter-Jan won’t be an easy job, but I am looking forward to working together with the Open Knowledge community and its partners on bringing Open Knowledge and Open Data in Belgium, as part of the international movement, to new heights.

As Pieter-Jan and I aren’t identical twin brothers, some things are going to slightly change as a result of my appointment. Hence, a quick update with my intentions as well as some expected changes in the coming months.

My belief: Open Knowledge and Open Data for a better and more sustainable future

With previous experiences in data modelling, civic engagement and crowdsourcing, I have developed a keen interest in open innovation and the power of many intrinsically motivated individuals contributing to projects with social and societal impact, serving the interests of the many rather than the happy few. However I do have plenty of room to learn, especially on the more technical side (currently taking a MOOC on Linked Data Engineering), I’m more than ready to take up the challenge and start working on projects, which are often, at the crossroads of public interest and private initiative.

My curious mind, some may even call it childish curiosity, makes me interested in many different things, but my main interest goes nowadays to ways open knowledge and open data can contribute to smart mobility solutions; more specifically, urban cycling; as part of the strong tendency towards more liveable cities. In the last few months I have been on a bike tour through Northern and Eastern Europe and had the opportunity to meet civic innovators working on, mostly community-driven, solutions to tackle local challenges. As I’m inspired by this rise of urban cycling movements all over the world and bike data projects like the one in the city of Riga, I’d like to further explore bike data and ultimately provide cities with smart cycling insights on safety, infrastructure and accessibility.

I have made a non-exhaustive list of existing initiatives to encourage urban cycling; please feel free to add other initiatives you know.

Another aspiration of mine is to help build, in preferably multiple Belgian cities, a civic hacking culture. A logical first step would be to gather passionate urban innovators (all backgrounds welcome) and work on a regular basis together on open source civic tech projects, get feedback from tech and government experts and learn about civic innovation and related concepts like open data, smart cities and open government.

The biweekly OK Labs in Stuttgart and weekly civic hack nights in San Francisco might be good starting points; let me know if you know other examples.

Other project coordinator, same open events

To put things clearly: all support to all Belgian Open Knowledge working groups as well as both events Open Belgium and open Summer of code can go on without any interruption.

In fact, even more correctly, we are even more ambitious than ever before and aim at gathering 300 attendees at our yearly community-driven Open Belgium conference, on the 6th of March 2017 in Brussels, in order to discuss open knowledge and open data efforts in Belgium. Last week we launched our open call for speakers — all proposals are welcome.

Office in Brussels

As it’s Open Knowledge Belgium’s clear objective to unify efforts all over the country, we will move our office from Ghent to Brussels. Don’t get me wrong: Ghent is and will always be an important place for our community, but we hope to expand our community and create new opportunities by moving to the center of the country. Hence, we’re currently looking for a new office space in Brussels, preferably near a railway station to make it as easy as possible for our community to gather. If you have any suggestions in mind, let us know.

Belgium as part of the international movement

Open Knowledge Belgium is, as a local chapter part of Open Knowledge International, part of a global movement to create open knowledge. Therefore, I also consider it as one of my priorities to connect with other country representatives, learn from their best practices and failures and let them hear about what we’re doing.

And yes, we can still learn from other countries: although Belgium has been moving up the ladder in the last few years, it was ranked at #35 in the 2015 Open Data Index with a score of 43% (39% the previous year) and considered as a follower by the European Data Portal.

Let me hear from you

As project & community coordinator, I’m there to assist the Belgian Open Knowledge community and its different working groups and partners. If you have any questions, proposals or whatever you want to talk about, please get in touch with me via dries@openknowledge.be or ping me on Twitter @DVRansbeeck or @OpenKnowledgeBE.

Please mark Friday the 25th of November in your agenda. Then we’ll have a farewell drink for Pieter-Jan as our fulltime community coordinator and a welcome drink for me as the new one. A perfect opportunity to get to know each other — see you there? And, oh yeah, drinks are on us! Simply register via https://opendrinks.eventbrite.nl/.

Introducing W4P, a crowdsourcing for open, social and local projects.

- June 24, 2016 in crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, Featured, General, Open Innovation, Open Source

After 10 months of figuring what we need to build, building it and then testing it in real life situation we can now say: W4P is alive! Or at least in a solid bèta. You can find our presentation in English here: Interested in hearing this talk again and do you have a location and or crowd? Or are you ready to start up a W4P crowdsourcing platform? Contact us!

Introducing W4P, a crowdsourcing for open, social and local projects.

- June 24, 2016 in crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, Featured, General, Open Innovation, Open Source

After 10 months of figuring what we need to build, building it and then testing it in real life situation we can now say: W4P is alive! Or at least in a solid bèta. You can find our presentation in English here:
Interested in hearing this talk again and do you have a location and or crowd? Or are you ready to start up a W4P crowdsourcing platform?
Contact us!

Introducing W4P, a crowdsourcing for open, social and local projects.

- June 24, 2016 in crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, Featured, General, Open Innovation, Open Source

After 10 months of figuring what we need to build, building it and then testing it in real life situation we can now say: W4P is alive! Or at least in a solid bèta. You can find our presentation in English here:
Interested in hearing this talk again and do you have a location and or crowd? Or are you ready to start up a W4P crowdsourcing platform?
Contact us!

Dans la vague “Open Data Day 2016”

- March 19, 2016 in Beog-neere, Burkina Faso, General, International, odd16, Open burkina, Open Data Day 2016, Open Knowledge, Open Street Map

Untitled2 Une journée modeste mais riche. L’Open data day 2016 au Burkina a permis de faire progresser l’appropriation de l’open data par l’écosystème et d’explorer de nouveaux domaines pour l’ouverture des données. Et cette fois, c’est le secteur de la santé qui était dans le viseur des militants de l’ouverture des données. Retour sur une journée d’échanges et débats passionnés autour de l’ouverture des données. Ambiance. Dans l’amphithéâtre de l’Institut supérieur privé polytechnique (ISPP) situé à un bout de la nouvelle ville (Ouaga 2000), l’ambiance est chaude ce samedi matin. L’amphi n’est pas remplie. Mais les discussions, passionnées par moment, du petit groupe qui occupe les lieux, font croire à un jour de cours. Une ambiance faite de passion, mais aussi de rires. Quand on discute haut et fort de données sur la santé, notamment où trouver ces données et qu’un participant inspiré vous suggère de chercher du côté des coopératives agricoles…. Imaginez. Bon, la parenthèse de l’Open Data et agriculture a été fermée sans qu’il ne se rende compte. Mais aussi, la confusion est facilement arrivée parce que l’ouverture des données au Burkina progresse d’un secteur à un autre, de l’agriculture à la santé. Bref. Nous sommes dans un pays, le premier dans l’Afrique francophone à s’engager dans un processus d’ouverture des données. Et il était important d’intéresser plus de monde à ce concept à la mode, l’Open Data.   Recap. La communauté open data du Burkina Faso a encore réussi un pari. Celui de conquérir de nouveaux secteurs d’activité et de nouvelles personnes dans le processus de l’ouverture des données. Le secteur de la santé et celui de l’énergie. La célébration de journée de l’ouverture des données s’est faite autour de ces thématiques et a dégagé de bonne perspective, notamment pour ce qui est de l’open data et énergie. Et si vous n’y étiez pas, voici un petit recap en deux points. PHOTO DE COUVERTURE FACEBOOK Qui étaient à la journée Open Data? L’un des objectifs en participant à l’Open Data Day était d’abord de faire connaître l’écosystème existant dans le domaine de l’Open data, permettre aux différents acteurs de se connaitre entre eux. Et ensuite de faire de faire progresser l’appropriation de l’open data par l’ensemble de l’écosystème des données au Burkina Faso.   Les différentes structures présentes et actives dans le domaine de l’Open Data ont été présentées. En l’occurrence, il s’agit de l’Initiative pour un Burkina Ouvert (Open Burkina), Open Knowledge Foundation (OKFN) Burkina Faso, BEOG NEERE (For a better future), Geek Developers Network (GDN), Burkina Open Data Initiative (BODI), Open Street Map (OSM) et le Fablab Ouagalabs. Une bonne brochette représentative de ce que le pays compte de structures intéressées par l’ouverture des données. On peut dire que depuis la première rencontre tenue en avril 2014 à Jokkolabs, cette communauté a grandi et que l’écosystème de l’Open Data au Burkina se dessine. Il y avait également ce samedi des étudiants en médecine et des professionnels de la santé qui sont venus découvrir l’open data et contribuer au débat sur l’ouverture des données sur la santé.   De quoi a-t-on parlé? De l’importance de la data et des opportunités. La journée a commencé par une mise à niveau des participants. Une bonne partie des étudiants et professionnels de la santé découvrait pour la première fois le concept de l’open data, grâce à la communication introductive donnée par Idriss Tinto, ambassadeur Open Knowledge Foundation au Burkina Faso. La communication a surtout insister sur l’importance de l’ouverture des données pour la démocratie, avec l’exemple édifiant de open élection, pour le développement avec des perspectives et opportunités dans des domaines comme l’éducation, l’agriculture ou la santé. Après cette phase théorique, la journée s’est poursuivi avec des ateliers plus participatifs. Untitled De l’ouverture des données dans le secteur de la santé. Le premier atelier a porté sur l’open data et santé. Assez passionnant. L’idée derrière cet atelier était de présenter les opportunités offertes par l’Open Data dans la santé, d’identifier les données clés à récolter, de se pencher sur leur réutilisation et finalement de poser les jalons d’une stratégie pour l’ouverture des données dans le domaine de la santé. Les échanges ont fait voir de nombreuses opportunités possibles avec les données du domaine de la santé. Reste qu’ils ont aussi révélé une chose de très important: la réticence des acteurs du domaine de la santé, notamment les étudiants qui ont montré des craintes d’intrusion dans leur métier.   D’un projet citoyen basé sur la cartographie. Le second atelier de la journée a porté sur le projet de cartographie des délestages dans la ville de Ouagadougou. Ce projet porté par Open Burkina a été présenté aux participants. Un projet ambitieux qui veut permettre aux Ouagalais de s’adapter à l’inconfort des délestages, en leur donnant une information de qualité à partir des données de la société de fourniture d’électricité. Pour le moins que l’on puisse dire, le projet a reçu des contributions intéressantes qui devront lui permettre d’évoluer et de prendre corps bientôt.   Leçon apprise. à chaque fois qu’il est question d’ouvrir des données, il y a à quelque part des réticences. Et les organisateurs de l’Open Data Day 2016 au Burkina ont bien fait d’inviter des professionnels et étudiants du domaine de la santé pour discuter de l’Open data et santé. Comme quoi, lorsque vous vous intéresser à un domaine, il est important d’associer dès le départ les professionnels du domaine pour savoir leurs craintes, leurs réticences et évoluer ensemble grâce à un débat constructif. Ils sont parfois les premiers alliés, soient en tant que producteurs de données, ou même bénéficiaires. Pour preuve? Le projet, nendo, présenté d’ailleurs lors de l’Open Data Day, pour lequel un particulier, professionnel du domaine a fourni les données qu’il avait sur l’éducation dans une commune donnée. IMG_20160305_163123 On retient, avec satisfaction que dans la vague mondiale de célébration de l’Open Data Day 2016 (257 évènements dans le monde!), ce samedi 5 mars, le Burkina Faso s’est fait compter. Article écrit par Justin Yarga