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Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice

- November 4, 2015 in communication, Data, Featured, handbook, oer, Open Data, Open Educational Practices, open educational resources

 

Javiera Atenas and Leo Havemann

    This post marks the official publication of the volume: Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice. The process of developing this book was a learning experience for us. We had no prior experience in independent publishing, but instead of going the traditional route of attempting to find a professional publisher, in the spirit of openness, we decided to self publish, and to make the entire process as open as possible. The intention of this book is to showcase good practices in an approachable way that can be understood by those who are not necessarily very familiar with open data or data analysis, in order to promote the use of open data as OER to educators, researchers and other organisations. Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice is the outcome of a collective effort that has its origins in the 5th Open Knowledge Open Education Working Group call, in which the idea of using Open Data in schools was mentioned. It occurred to us that Open Data and open educational resources seemed to us almost to exist in separate open worlds. We decided to seek out evidence in the use of open data as OER, initially by conducting a bibliographical search. As we could not find published evidence, we decided to ask educators if they were in fact, using open data in this way, and wrote a post for this blog (with Ernesto Priego) explaining our perspective, called The 21st Century’s Raw Material: Using Open Data as Open Educational Resources. We ended the post with a link to an exploratory survey, the results of which indicated a need for more awareness of the existence and potential value of Open Data amongst educators. A couple of months later, we spoke (along with William Hammonds) at the 7th Open Education Working Group Call: Open Data as Open Educational Resources where we ‘set out our stall’ on this topic, and formalised the idea of collecting case studies to be published as an open book for educators. As ever, Marieke Guy did a wonderful job chairing the Working Group call and pushing the conversation forward by raising difficult questions. Meanwhile, we were invited by Antonio Moneo and Geraldine García, to publish our ideas in Spanish in the open knowledge blog of the Inter-American Development Bank. The majority of the proposals we received were accepted as they fit the themes of the book, and yet each took a different angle on the subject matter. Some other authors who contacted us with with ideas which were not quite right for this project were able to find a home for them here on the OEWG blog instead. As we started receiving the proposals we also decided to ask a group of experts if they were willing to join us to be part of a scientific committee overseeing the book of case studies, who would act as peer reviewers but, more than that, work alongside the authors and ourselves, towards developing the case studies within an open review model. The experts that joined with us, Marieke Guy, William Hammonds, Anne-Christin Tannhäuser, Maria Perifanou and Ernesto Priego, have a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and work experiences, but all share an interest in open educational practices and were happy to embrace the openness of the project. As soon as they started selecting the cases and working with the authors to develop the drafts, it became clear to us that we had been joined by a group of fantastic people – making the process much easier for all of us – as the authors and reviewers worked seamlessly in a spirit of mutual respect and admiration. Because of the pivotal role they have played, we wanted to include the voices of the committee members overtly in the book, so we asked each of them for a reflection on both process and product. In her piece, Marieke comments that the result is a set of “detailed and diverse case studies. They are cutting edge tales that show exciting efforts to try out something new, to experiment and to learn from the results”; and for Will, the case studies illustrate the final challenge: “supporting academics and teaching staff to develop their own skills and interests to use open data in this way.” As we approached the finish line, our friend and colleague Santiago Martín joined us to act as designer. He made a great job of bringing a tonne of files in various different formats into OpenOffice, using an open font, and turning them into this book. And so last, but certainly not least in the story of this book, we come to the case studies themselves. They have been provided by scholars and practitioners from different disciplines and countries, and they reflect different approaches to the use of open data. The first case study presents an approach to educating both teachers and students in the use of open data for civil monitoring via Scuola di OpenCoesione in Italy, and has been written by Chiara Ciociola and Luigi Reggi. The second case, by Tim Coughlan from the Open University, UK, showcases practical applications in the use of local and contextualised open data for the development of apps. The third case, written by Katie Shamash, Juan Pablo Alperin & Alessandra Bordini from Simon Fraser University, Canada, demonstrates how publishing students can engage, through data analysis, in very current debates around scholarly communications and be encouraged to publish their own findings. The fourth case by Alan Dix from Talis and University of Birmingham, UK, and Geoffrey Ellis from University of Konstanz, Germany, is unique because the data discussed in this case is self-produced, indeed ‘quantified self’ data, which was used with students as material for class discussion and, separately, as source data for another student’s dissertation project. Finally, the fifth case, presented by Virginia Power from University of the West of England, UK, examines strategies to develop data and statistical literacies in future librarians and knowledge managers, aiming to support and extend their theoretical understanding of the concept of the ‘knowledge society’ through the use of Open Data. We believe the discussions raised by this book are useful in their own right, as wider engagement with, as well as transparency of, public knowledge, are in our view, very worthy aims for education. In addition, we believe that the use of Open Data as OER aids in the development of students’ transversal skills, that is, their literacies, numeracies and digital capabilities, allowing them to think and work as scientists and policy makers, in order to truly operate as global citizens. This book has been made possible thanks to the support of many people. We would like to thank Paul Bacsich and Elena Stojanovska for supporting the continuation of this project and for their encouragement, and also our fellow OEP advocates at OKFN Edu, OpenEd SIG, OER Research Hub, ELESIG, Open Education Europe, School of Data, ILDA, and finally, our colleagues and friends at UCL and Birkbeck. The book can be downloaded here Open Data as Open Educational Resources Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice, edited by Javiera Atenas and Leo Havemann. London: Open Knowledge, Open Education Working Group, 2015. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1590031  

Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice

- November 4, 2015 in communication, Data, Featured, handbook, oer, Open Data, Open Educational Practices, open educational resources

 

Javiera Atenas and Leo Havemann

    This post marks the official publication of the volume: Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice. The process of developing this book was a learning experience for us. We had no prior experience in independent publishing, but instead of going the traditional route of attempting to find a professional publisher, in the spirit of openness, we decided to self publish, and to make the entire process as open as possible. The intention of this book is to showcase good practices in an approachable way that can be understood by those who are not necessarily very familiar with open data or data analysis, in order to promote the use of open data as OER to educators, researchers and other organisations. Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice is the outcome of a collective effort that has its origins in the 5th Open Knowledge Open Education Working Group call, in which the idea of using Open Data in schools was mentioned. It occurred to us that Open Data and open educational resources seemed to us almost to exist in separate open worlds. We decided to seek out evidence in the use of open data as OER, initially by conducting a bibliographical search. As we could not find published evidence, we decided to ask educators if they were in fact, using open data in this way, and wrote a post for this blog (with Ernesto Priego) explaining our perspective, called The 21st Century’s Raw Material: Using Open Data as Open Educational Resources. We ended the post with a link to an exploratory survey, the results of which indicated a need for more awareness of the existence and potential value of Open Data amongst educators. A couple of months later, we spoke (along with William Hammonds) at the 7th Open Education Working Group Call: Open Data as Open Educational Resources where we ‘set out our stall’ on this topic, and formalised the idea of collecting case studies to be published as an open book for educators. As ever, Marieke Guy did a wonderful job chairing the Working Group call and pushing the conversation forward by raising difficult questions. Meanwhile, we were invited by Antonio Moneo and Geraldine García, to publish our ideas in Spanish in the open knowledge blog of the Inter-American Development Bank. The majority of the proposals we received were accepted as they fit the themes of the book, and yet each took a different angle on the subject matter. Some other authors who contacted us with with ideas which were not quite right for this project were able to find a home for them here on the OEWG blog instead. As we started receiving the proposals we also decided to ask a group of experts if they were willing to join us to be part of a scientific committee overseeing the book of case studies, who would act as peer reviewers but, more than that, work alongside the authors and ourselves, towards developing the case studies within an open review model. The experts that joined with us, Marieke Guy, William Hammonds, Anne-Christin Tannhäuser, Maria Perifanou and Ernesto Priego, have a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and work experiences, but all share an interest in open educational practices and were happy to embrace the openness of the project. As soon as they started selecting the cases and working with the authors to develop the drafts, it became clear to us that we had been joined by a group of fantastic people – making the process much easier for all of us – as the authors and reviewers worked seamlessly in a spirit of mutual respect and admiration. Because of the pivotal role they have played, we wanted to include the voices of the committee members overtly in the book, so we asked each of them for a reflection on both process and product. In her piece, Marieke comments that the result is a set of “detailed and diverse case studies. They are cutting edge tales that show exciting efforts to try out something new, to experiment and to learn from the results”; and for Will, the case studies illustrate the final challenge: “supporting academics and teaching staff to develop their own skills and interests to use open data in this way.” As we approached the finish line, our friend and colleague Santiago Martín joined us to act as designer. He made a great job of bringing a tonne of files in various different formats into OpenOffice, using an open font, and turning them into this book. And so last, but certainly not least in the story of this book, we come to the case studies themselves. They have been provided by scholars and practitioners from different disciplines and countries, and they reflect different approaches to the use of open data. The first case study presents an approach to educating both teachers and students in the use of open data for civil monitoring via Scuola di OpenCoesione in Italy, and has been written by Chiara Ciociola and Luigi Reggi. The second case, by Tim Coughlan from the Open University, UK, showcases practical applications in the use of local and contextualised open data for the development of apps. The third case, written by Katie Shamash, Juan Pablo Alperin & Alessandra Bordini from Simon Fraser University, Canada, demonstrates how publishing students can engage, through data analysis, in very current debates around scholarly communications and be encouraged to publish their own findings. The fourth case by Alan Dix from Talis and University of Birmingham, UK, and Geoffrey Ellis from University of Konstanz, Germany, is unique because the data discussed in this case is self-produced, indeed ‘quantified self’ data, which was used with students as material for class discussion and, separately, as source data for another student’s dissertation project. Finally, the fifth case, presented by Virginia Power from University of the West of England, UK, examines strategies to develop data and statistical literacies in future librarians and knowledge managers, aiming to support and extend their theoretical understanding of the concept of the ‘knowledge society’ through the use of Open Data. We believe the discussions raised by this book are useful in their own right, as wider engagement with, as well as transparency of, public knowledge, are in our view, very worthy aims for education. In addition, we believe that the use of Open Data as OER aids in the development of students’ transversal skills, that is, their literacies, numeracies and digital capabilities, allowing them to think and work as scientists and policy makers, in order to truly operate as global citizens. This book has been made possible thanks to the support of many people. We would like to thank Paul Bacsich and Elena Stojanovska for supporting the continuation of this project and for their encouragement, and also our fellow OEP advocates at OKFN Edu, OpenEd SIG, OER Research Hub, ELESIG, Open Education Europe, School of Data, ILDA, and finally, our colleagues and friends at UCL and Birkbeck. The book can be downloaded here Open Data as Open Educational Resources Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice, edited by Javiera Atenas and Leo Havemann. London: Open Knowledge, Open Education Working Group, 2015. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1590031  

Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice

- November 4, 2015 in communication, Data, Featured, handbook, oer, Open Data, Open Educational Practices, open educational resources

 

Javiera Atenas and Leo Havemann

    This post marks the official publication of the volume: Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice. The process of developing this book was a learning experience for us. We had no prior experience in independent publishing, but instead of going the traditional route of attempting to find a professional publisher, in the spirit of openness, we decided to self publish, and to make the entire process as open as possible. The intention of this book is to showcase good practices in an approachable way that can be understood by those who are not necessarily very familiar with open data or data analysis, in order to promote the use of open data as OER to educators, researchers and other organisations. Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice is the outcome of a collective effort that has its origins in the 5th Open Knowledge Open Education Working Group call, in which the idea of using Open Data in schools was mentioned. It occurred to us that Open Data and open educational resources seemed to us almost to exist in separate open worlds. We decided to seek out evidence in the use of open data as OER, initially by conducting a bibliographical search. As we could not find published evidence, we decided to ask educators if they were in fact, using open data in this way, and wrote a post for this blog (with Ernesto Priego) explaining our perspective, called The 21st Century’s Raw Material: Using Open Data as Open Educational Resources. We ended the post with a link to an exploratory survey, the results of which indicated a need for more awareness of the existence and potential value of Open Data amongst educators. A couple of months later, we spoke (along with William Hammonds) at the 7th Open Education Working Group Call: Open Data as Open Educational Resources where we ‘set out our stall’ on this topic, and formalised the idea of collecting case studies to be published as an open book for educators. As ever, Marieke Guy did a wonderful job chairing the Working Group call and pushing the conversation forward by raising difficult questions. Meanwhile, we were invited by Antonio Moneo and Geraldine García, to publish our ideas in Spanish in the open knowledge blog of the Inter-American Development Bank. The majority of the proposals we received were accepted as they fit the themes of the book, and yet each took a different angle on the subject matter. Some other authors who contacted us with with ideas which were not quite right for this project were able to find a home for them here on the OEWG blog instead. As we started receiving the proposals we also decided to ask a group of experts if they were willing to join us to be part of a scientific committee overseeing the book of case studies, who would act as peer reviewers but, more than that, work alongside the authors and ourselves, towards developing the case studies within an open review model. The experts that joined with us, Marieke Guy, William Hammonds, Anne-Christin Tannhäuser, Maria Perifanou and Ernesto Priego, have a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and work experiences, but all share an interest in open educational practices and were happy to embrace the openness of the project. As soon as they started selecting the cases and working with the authors to develop the drafts, it became clear to us that we had been joined by a group of fantastic people – making the process much easier for all of us – as the authors and reviewers worked seamlessly in a spirit of mutual respect and admiration. Because of the pivotal role they have played, we wanted to include the voices of the committee members overtly in the book, so we asked each of them for a reflection on both process and product. In her piece, Marieke comments that the result is a set of “detailed and diverse case studies. They are cutting edge tales that show exciting efforts to try out something new, to experiment and to learn from the results”; and for Will, the case studies illustrate the final challenge: “supporting academics and teaching staff to develop their own skills and interests to use open data in this way.” As we approached the finish line, our friend and colleague Santiago Martín joined us to act as designer. He made a great job of bringing a tonne of files in various different formats into OpenOffice, using an open font, and turning them into this book. And so last, but certainly not least in the story of this book, we come to the case studies themselves. They have been provided by scholars and practitioners from different disciplines and countries, and they reflect different approaches to the use of open data. The first case study presents an approach to educating both teachers and students in the use of open data for civil monitoring via Scuola di OpenCoesione in Italy, and has been written by Chiara Ciociola and Luigi Reggi. The second case, by Tim Coughlan from the Open University, UK, showcases practical applications in the use of local and contextualised open data for the development of apps. The third case, written by Katie Shamash, Juan Pablo Alperin & Alessandra Bordini from Simon Fraser University, Canada, demonstrates how publishing students can engage, through data analysis, in very current debates around scholarly communications and be encouraged to publish their own findings. The fourth case by Alan Dix from Talis and University of Birmingham, UK, and Geoffrey Ellis from University of Konstanz, Germany, is unique because the data discussed in this case is self-produced, indeed ‘quantified self’ data, which was used with students as material for class discussion and, separately, as source data for another student’s dissertation project. Finally, the fifth case, presented by Virginia Power from University of the West of England, UK, examines strategies to develop data and statistical literacies in future librarians and knowledge managers, aiming to support and extend their theoretical understanding of the concept of the ‘knowledge society’ through the use of Open Data. We believe the discussions raised by this book are useful in their own right, as wider engagement with, as well as transparency of, public knowledge, are in our view, very worthy aims for education. In addition, we believe that the use of Open Data as OER aids in the development of students’ transversal skills, that is, their literacies, numeracies and digital capabilities, allowing them to think and work as scientists and policy makers, in order to truly operate as global citizens. This book has been made possible thanks to the support of many people. We would like to thank Paul Bacsich and Elena Stojanovska for supporting the continuation of this project and for their encouragement, and also our fellow OEP advocates at OKFN Edu, OpenEd SIG, OER Research Hub, ELESIG, Open Education Europe, School of Data, ILDA, and finally, our colleagues and friends at UCL and Birkbeck. The book can be downloaded here Open Data as Open Educational Resources Open Data as Open Educational Resources: Case studies of emerging practice, edited by Javiera Atenas and Leo Havemann. London: Open Knowledge, Open Education Working Group, 2015. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1590031  

Announcing the new open data handbook

- May 13, 2015 in community, handbook, Open Data, Open Data Handbook, Open Knowledge

We are thrilled to announce that the Open Data Handbook, the premier guide for open data newcomers and veterans alike, has received a much needed update! The Open Data Handbook, originally published in 2012, has become the go to resource for the open data community. It was written by expert members of the open data community and has been translated into over 18 languages. Read it now » handbook The Open Data Handbook elaborates on the what, why & how of open data. In other words – what data should be open, what are the social and economic benefits of opening that data, and how to make effective use of it once it is opened. The handbook is targeted at a broad audience, including civil servants, journalists, activists, developers, and researchers as well as open data publishers. Our aim is to ensure open data is widely available and applied in as many contexts as possible, we welcome your efforts to grow the open knowledge movement in this way! The idea of open data is really catching on and we have learned many important lessons over the past three years. We believe that is time that the Open Data Handbook reflect these learnings. The revised Open Data Handbook has a number of new features and plenty of ways to contribute your experience and knowledge, please do!

 Inspire Open Data Newcomers

The original open data guide discussed the theoretical reasons for opening up data – increasing transparency and accountability of government, improving public and commercial services, stimulating innovation etc. We have now reached a point where we are able to go beyond theoretical arguments — we have real stories that document the benefits open data has on our lives. The Open Data Value Stories are use cases from across the open knowledge network that highlighting the social and economic value and the varied applications of open data in the world. This is by no means an exhaustive list; in fact just the beginning! If you have an open data value story that you would like to contribute, please get in touch.

 Learn How to Publish & Use Open Data

The Open Data Guide remains the premier open data how-to resource and in the coming months we will be adding new sections and features! For the time being, we have moved the guide to Github to streamline contributions and facilitate translation. We will be reaching out to the community shortly to determine what new content we should be prioritising. While in 2012, when we originally published the open data guide, the open data community was still emerging and resources remained scarce, today as the global open data community is mature, international and diverse and resources now exist that reflect this maturity and diversity. The Open Data Resource Library is curated collection of resources, including articles, longer publications, how to guides, presentations and videos, produced by the global open data community — now available all in one place! If you want to contribute a resource, you can do so here! We are particularly interested in expanding the number of resources we have in languages other than English so please add them if you have them! Finally, as we are probably all aware, the open data community likes its jargon! While the original open data guide had a glossary of terms, it was far from exhaustive — especially for newcomers to the open data movement. In the updated version we have added over 80 new terms and concepts with easy to understand definitions! Have we missed something out? Let us know what we are missing here. The updated Open Data Handbook is a living resource! In the coming months, we will be adding new sections to the Open Data Guide and producing countless more value stories! We invite you to contribute your stories, your resources and your ideas! Thank you for your contributions past, present and future and your continued efforts in pushing this movement forward.

Open Education Handbook Poster at OER15

- April 13, 2015 in Events, Featured, handbook, oer15

Today and tomorrow we will be at OER15 exhibiting our poster on the Open Education Handbook in the poster display. You can see the poster on Slideshare or download as a PDF. Abstract Where would you go if you wanted to know about the history of open education? What about if you were after a list of editor tools for remixing OERs? Or if you wanted to know more about open learning and practice? How about if you wanted to find out more about OERs and their use in the developing world? Or were considering what affect open education has on education? And what about if you were interested in open education data? There is a lot of information on open education and OERs strewn across the web but now it has been brought together in a collaboratively written, user-friendly handbook. The Open Education Handbook is a living web document targeting educational practitioners and the education community at large. It is the result of a crowd-sourced initiative led by the Open Education Working Group: one in the series of over 20 Open Knowledge working groups that has been established to bring together people and groups interested in open education. The handbook has been drafted over a series of online and offline events including booksprints and focused mailing list discussions. Content is key within the handbook and it has a broad coverage considering both practical and factual areas and more discursive topics. The handbook is currently held in Booktype, an open source platform for writing and publishing print and digital books. Content from the handbook has been translated into Portuguese (Manual de Educação Aberta) surfaced in open education books, featured on Slidewiki and reused in lots of other great places. Late last year the handbook was edited and tidied up. Improvements were made to many areas including overall structure, typos and writing, universal style, fact checking, citations and links, glossary and definitions. An iteration of the handbook was then made available as a PDF and in ePub format. To realise its full potential as a resource the handbook needs to be allowed to continue to evolve and be built upon. Discussions have already taken place around the future of the handbook and possible ideas include moving it to Wiki books, embedding it within Wikipedia and building a front-end for it to use with Booktype. It is hoped that these ideas can be developed further in discussion with the community. Would you be interested in contributing to the handbook? Can you help formulate the next steps for this great open resource? This poster will share highlights from the handbook, its development and its future. The Handbook is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). References

Getting ready for OER15!

- April 6, 2015 in Events, Featured, handbook, oer15

So who is off to OER15 next week? This year’s Open Education Conference (OER15) will take place at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama in Cardiff. OER15 is one of a series of annual International conferences which discuss research and practice in the adoption of Open Education in all sectors of Education and Training. thumbnail-700x250 The provisional programme timetable is online and there are some great sessions.The main conference focus will be ‘Mainstreaming Open Education’ along with six sub themes :
  • Impact Research
  • Open Education across Languages and Cultures
  • Learners and Other Communities
  • Open Educational Practice (OEP) and Policy
  • Open Courses
  • Open Education in Colleges and Schools 
The Open Education Working Group will be represented with a poster on the Open Education Handbook. We are looking forward to meeting up with members of the community from all around the world! See the participant map for a look at the spread of delegates! map

Wikibooks version of Open Education Handbook

- December 17, 2014 in Featured, handbook

cover-shadowAs discussed in last week’s community session, for the Open Education Handbook to realise its full potential it needs to be allowed to continue to evolve and be built upon. One possible way to do this is to allow the handbook to be embedded into new communities, ifMartin Poulter from WikimediaUK has taken some first steps to do this and has copied the Open Education Handbook to Wikibooks (https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Open_Education_Handbook). Here he shares some thoughts on the process and how the open education community can improve the content and build new books. ** Wikibooks is a sister project to Wikipedia. User accounts on Wikipedia work on Wikibooks, and the editing interface is the same. However it is quieter than Wikipedia and there are no problem with trolls or hoaxers. It is specifically meant for manuals, how-tos, recipes and textbooks and less constrained than an encyclopedia. Like all Wikimedia projects it is truly free: reusable by anyone for any purpose under CC-BY-SA and the GNU Free Documentation Licence. It is also massively multilingual, so for example, there is a Portugese Wikibooks at https://pt.wikibooks.org/ which could potentially host the translated version of the Open Education Handbook. It is also connected to Wikimedia Commons: any of Wiki Common’s 24 million open-content media files can be embedded in Wikibooks. wikibooksIn the process of making the Wikibooks edition, I have identified some minor errors like typos and broken links. I’m making these publicly available so that anyone hosting the book on any platform can make the same fixes – Google doc. As well as corrections, the Wikibooks edition has an in-book search facility as well as live-export-to PDF or to print-on-demand. It’s worth checking out the Featured books section of Wikibooks, which already includes books on open educational practice, blended learning, Library ICT and other topics: https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Wikibooks:Featured_books I’d like to do more such imports, not just of books about education, but suitable open textbooks and reference books. So if I may appeal on behalf of Wikibooks, we’re after:
  • Other books/manuals licensed compatibly (CC-BY-SA or CC-BY) that can be imported.
  • Editors/proofreaders : just create an account, read the books and correct any errors you find.
  • Illustrators: find an existing image on Wikimedia Commons to illustrate a Wikibook page, or upload freely-licensed images to Commons.
  • Other communities who want to collaboratively build a book reflecting current knowledge on any topic (could be a group of students on an assignment).
NB: Wikibooks content is supposed to be descriptive “how-to”, not a catalogue of web sites. Some of the Open Education Handbook sections are mainly links lists, but I advise against that style. You can normally get readership stats for any page on Wikibooks by clicking “View History”, then “Statistics”.

Community Session: Open Education Handbook

- November 21, 2014 in Events, Featured, handbook

The Open Education Working Group will be participating in an Open Knowledge Community session entitled Presenting the Open Education Handbook. The session will take place online on Thursday Dec 11, 2014 – 10.00-11.00AM UTC, with a link to be shared on this page nearer the time. The Open Education Handbook is a collaboratively written living web document targeting educational practitioners and the education community at large. The session will be an opportunity to hear about the history of handbook, the current status of handbook and be involved in a discussion about the next steps for the handbook. It will be facilitated by Christian Villum (Open Knowledge) with presentations from Marieke Guy (Open Knowledge and Open Education Working Group co-ordinator) and Rob Farrow (Open University). hand3 The Working Group Call etherpad will be used for notes before and during the session. We hope to see you there! cover7

Open Education Handbook Update

- November 6, 2014 in communication, Featured, handbook

cover7The Open Education Handbook was conceived as an intended deliverable for the LinkedUp Project. The LinkedUp Description of Work describes the ‘LinkedUp Handbook on Open Data in Education’ as a “resource for both educators and Web data providers as well as adopters….The Linked Up Handbook will be created as a living document to reflect project learnings and findings, which will help others, both during the project and beyond it“. To fulfill this brief the handbook has evolved to consider the broader scope of open education resulting in it being renamed as ‘the Open Education Handbook‘. It is a collaboratively written living web document targeting educational practitioners and the education community at large and has been developed through a series of offline and online events. During its evolution the handbook has received contributions from organisations and individuals that span sectors and countries. The writing of the handbook has been very much embedded within the Open Education Working Group and will continue to remain an important part of our working group work.

History of the handbook

The content of the Handbook has been crowd-sourced and drafted over a series of online and offline events. The initial booksprint was held in London on 3rd September 2013 and the handbook was formed in three Google docs. In late 2013 the handbook was moved from Google Docs to Booktype, an open source platform for writing and publishing print and digital books developed by SourceFabric. It has continued to be written in Booktype and the software has been found to be a suitable platform in which to house a collaboratively written handbook. A second booksprint took place in Berlin on Friday 22nd November 2013 and was organised in collaboration with Wikimedia Deutschland. During this event the handbook was ‘chunked up’ into a number of question areas and discussion took place over the direction of the handbook. On January 20th, as an activity for Education Freedom Day, the Open Education Handbook was translated and adapted into Portuguese. This process highlighted some interesting possibilities and challenges for the handbook such as the requirements of a global audience. Throughout 2014 the handbook has been further developed through a series of Friday Chats that have taken place on the Open Education Working Group mailing list. These discussions have provided the handbook with well-thought out objective content that is not available elsewhere on the web. In late September 2014 in preparation for the delivery of the ‘final version’ of the handbook an external editor (Rob Farrow of the Open University) was employed to proof read the handbook. The editor was asked to look at areas including overall structure, typos and poor writing, universal style, fact checking, citations and links, glossary and definitions. The handbook is now a comprehensive and intelligent overview of the current situation with regard to Open Education and Open Education data. However to realise its full potential such a resource needs to be allowed to continue to evolve and be built upon. The writing of the handbook has been very much embedded within the Open Education Working Group throughout the LinkedUp Project lifecycle, and it is here that it will continue to stay until a more appropriate place is found. Discussions have already taken place around the future of the handbook and possible ideas include moving it to Wiki books, embedding it within Wikipedia and building a front-end for it to use with Booktype. It is hoped that these ideas can be developed further in discussion with the community.

Links

Data Roundup, 11 February

- February 11, 2014 in accurat, course, d3, Data Roundup, giorgia lupi, handbook, infographics, olympics, portuguese, winter

Stephen Thomas – Earth

Tools, Events, Courses Those of you who have fallen in love with d3.js should absolutely follow d3noob.org, an interesting blog where you can get useful tips and two free e-books on d3 and leaflet.js. Ekuatorial is a new website built to display environmental changes through digital cartography. Read more about this ‘geo-journalism’ experiment in this introduction on Visualoop. Did you know that Randy Krum, founder of Cool Infographics, is on tour for a series of events on data visualization? Check out his roadmap and don’t miss the date. A new course on data journalism is about to start next week at Wits Journalism in Johannesburg. The course begins on Monday 17 and will be held by New York Time’s Ron Nixon. Data Stories San Valentine is getting closer: give yourself a minute to read this curious infographic on its origin and on how it is celebrated around the world. The Sochi winter Olympics just started, and Twitter Data already published a visualization on it. See Tweets about #Sochi2014 on datawrapper. You might also want to scroll down this infographic on which winter Olympic sport would you play? posted on Visually. The Global Investigative Journalism Network recently posted a graph on last week’s most popular data journalism links. If you wonder what topic recently captured data-addicted attention around the world, you should absolutely see it or play with the interactive version. Data Sources Accurat is an Italian information design agency which surely represents the avant garde in the data visualization market. If you are curious about how it works and what’s its operating model watch the interview with one of its co-founder, Giorgia Lupi, at the New York School of Visual Arts. The Online Journalism Blog of Paul Bradshaw is always a gold mine of good informations. If you are looking for some tips and suggestions on data journalism, here you may find some. Finally, we remind you that the Portuguese version of The Data Journalism Handbook is now available here. flattr this!