You are browsing the archive for Images-Illustrations.

Edward Lear’s Walk on a Windy Day (1860)

- December 12, 2013 in Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, birds, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, edward lear, flying, humour, Images, Images-19th, Images-Animals, Images-Illustrations, Images-People, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide

An Edward Lear story concerning a man, referred to simply as E.L., taking the grave risk of going out for a walk on a windy day and living the consequences. These ten rare sketches are in a bound edition living in the Frederick R. Koch Collection at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library in Yale University. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most […]

Illustrative plates from How I Killed the Tiger (1902)

- May 15, 2013 in collections, colonialism, death, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, hunting, Images, Images-20th, Images-Animals, Images-Illustrations, india, Internet Archive, tiger, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide, University of Toronto Libraries

Selected plates from How I killed the tiger; being an account of my encounter with a royal Bengal tiger, with an appendix containing some general information about India (1902), a small book by Lieutenant Colonel Frank Sheffield detailing his close brush with death by tiger. As the author explains in his introduction: My main purpose in writing this little book, was to place in a permanent form a description of my wonderful preservation from death in a chance encounter with a Royal Bengal Tiger. My life had been adventurous up to that time. I had shot big game of various kinds. But this episode, so marvellous in itself, so important in its influence upon my after life and character, marks the close of my career as a hunter of big game. Read the book, including more illustrative plates, over in our post in the Texts collection. Housed at: Internet Archive | From: University of Toronto Libraries Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to [...]

Illustrations from a Victorian book on Magic (1897)

- April 17, 2013 in California Digital Library, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, illusion, Images, Images-19th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Illustrations, Images: Miscellaneous, Internet Archive, magic, magician, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide, victorian

Selected images from a massive late 19th century tome entitled simply Magic, subtitled Stage Illusions and Scientific Diversions, including Trick Photography, compiled and edited by Albert A. Hopkins. The book takes a thorough tour through the popular magic tricks and illusions of the day, including along the way many delightfully surreal diagrams and illustrations, the top pick of which we’ve included here – often especially great when seen out of context. Towards the end are some particularly great “decapitation” trick photographs. See the book, with explanatory text and many more illustrations over in our post in the Texts collection. Housed at: Internet Archive | From: California Digital Library Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP [...]

A Fashionable Melange of English Words (1887)

- January 23, 2013 in Alphabet, collections, Images, Images-19th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Illustrations, Images: Miscellaneous, japan, japanese, language, woodcut

A Japanese woodcut by Kamekichi Tsunajima titled “Ryūkō eigo zukushi”, or “A Fashionable Melange of English Words”. The print shows images of animals, activities and objects each with their Japanese and English names. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately) some spelling mistakes have given rise to some interesting new activities such as “Refreshiug” and “Cuting Rice”, and the “Gaot”, “Hoise” and “Tea Po”. The introduction of activities (including the very Zen-like “Looking Moon”) give an interesting take on the often more object-orientated Western equivalents. Also worth noting the interesting additions of “Cross Child” rather than simply “Child” , and “Blank Book” rather than “Book”. (This image has been “restored” by Wikimedia user trialanderrors and is housed at Wikimedia Commons. The original can be found at the Library of Congress). SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription! Name: E-mail:

A Pictorial History of Santa Claus

- December 13, 2012 in christmas, clement moore, coca cola, collections, father christmas, Images, Images-19th, Images-20th, Images-Illustrations, norman rockwell, santa claus, thomas nast

Contrary to what many believe, Santa Claus as we know him today – sleigh riding, gift-giving, rotund and white bearded with his distinctive red suit trimmed with white fur – was not the creation of the Coca Cola Company. Although their Christmas advertising campaigns of the 1930s and 40s were key to popularising the image, Santa can be seen in his modern form decades before Coca Cola’s illustrator Haddon Sundblom got to work. Prior to settling on his famed red garb and jolly bearded countenance, throughout the latter half of the 19th century, Santa morphed through a variety of different looks. From the description given in Clement Moore’s A Visit from St Nicholas in 1822, through the vision of artist Thomas Nast, and later Norman Rockwell, Mr Claus gradually shed his various guises and became the jolly red-suited Santa we know today. Below we’ve put together a little pictorial guide showing his evolvement through the ages. 13TH CENTURY The name Santa Claus has his roots in the informal Dutch name for St. Nicholas, Sinterklaas (an abbreviation of Sint Nikolaas). St. Nicholas was a historic 4th-century Greek saint (from an area now in modern day Turkey) who had a reputation for [...]

Illustrations from a Chapbook on Robinson Crusoe (ca.1800)

- December 7, 2012 in chapbooks, collections, Images, Images-18th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Illustrations, robinson crusoe

Illustrations from a chapbook entitled The Surprising Life and most Strange Adventures of Robinson Crusoe Of the City of York, Mariner (ca.1800) as featured in John Ashton’s Chap-books of the Eighteenth Century (1882). (All images taken from the Chap-books of the eighteenth century, with facsimiles, notes, and introduction by John Ashton (1882) housed at the Internet Archive, donated by University of Pittsburgh Library System). Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription!

The Calaveras of José Guadalupe Posada

- November 2, 2012 in Antonio Vanegas Arroyo, calaveras, cartoons, collections, day of the dead, Día de los Muertos, Images, Images-19th, Images-20th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Illustrations, Images-People, José Guadalupe Posada, mexico, skeletons, skulls

José Guadalupe Posada (1851–1913) was a Mexican illustrator known for his satirical and politically acute calaveras. Deriving from the Spanish word for ‘skulls’, these calaveras were illustrations featuring skeletons which would, after Posada’s death, become closely associated with the mexican holiday Día de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead. Most of these calaveras were published by the press of Antonio Vanegas Arroyo which produced inexpensive literature for the lower classes, including thousands of satirical broadsides which Posada illustrated. Through this focus on mortality Vanegas Arroyo and Posada satirised many poignant issues of the day, in particular the details of bourgeois life and the dictatorship of Porfirio Díaz. On January 20th 1913, 3 years after the start of the Mexican Revolution, José Guadalupe Posada died at his home in obscurity. He was penniless and buried in an unmarked grave. It was only years later in the 1920s that his work became recognised on a national and international level after it was championed by the French ex-patriot artist Jean Charlot who described Posada as “printmaker to the Mexican people”. (All images taken from the Library of Congress). Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your [...]

Illustrated initials from a German fairytale book (1919)

- September 20, 2012 in fairytales, Images, Images-20th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Illustrations, initials, non-article

Illustrated initials from Deutsche Märchen seit Grimm (German Fairytales since Grimm), a German fairytale book from 1919.

(All images from an online copy of the book housed at the Internet Archive, donated by the University of Connecticut Libraries. Hat-tip to Pinterest user Michele Finnegan)















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German Folk Dress (1887)

- September 7, 2012 in austria, costume, folk dress, germany, Images, Images-19th, Images-Illustrations, Images-Painting, Images-People, non-article

Images from Deutsche Volkstrachten, Original-Zeichnungen mit erklärendem Text (1887) by Albert Kretschmer, a book detailing the folk dress of the peoples in areas covering modern day Austria and southern Germany. Albert Kretschmer (1825-1891) was known for his highly detailed drawings, watercolors and lithographs usually in publications detailing varieties of German and international costumes and historical clothing. In addition, he worked until 1889 as a costume designer at the Königliches Schauspielhaus in Berlin. (Wikipedia)

(All images taken from Deutsche Volkstrachten, Original-Zeichnungen mit erklärendem Text housed at the Internet Archive, donated by University of Toronto Libraries – Hat-tip to Old Book Illustrations Scrapbook Blog where we first came across the images).

Austria – Styria (Steiermark)



Austria – Pinzgau



Vorarlberg – Bregenzerwald



Tyrol – Bechthal



Tyrol – Uber Innthal













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Cartoon Portraits of Leading 19th Century Figures (1873)

- August 17, 2012 in browning, caricature, cartoon, darwin, gustave dore, Images, Images-19th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Illustrations, Images-People, john ruskin, mark twain, non-article, tennyson, william morris

A selection of the more well known of the leading 19th century figures featured in Cartoon Portraits and Biographical Sketches of Men of the Day (1873) with drawings by Frederick Watty and accompanied by biographical pieces on each of the subjects. With the exception of one, it is a compilation of all the cartoon portraits that were featured in Once a Week, a magazine originally founded as a result of a dispute between Bradbury and Evans and Charles Dickens. Bradbury and Evans had been Dickens’ publisher since 1844, including publishing his magazine Household Words. In 1859, Bradbury and Evans refused to carry an advertisement by Dickens explaining why he had broken with Mrs. Dickens. In consequence, Dickens stopped work on Household Words and founded a new magazine, All The Year Round, which he decided would be editorially independent of any publisher. Bradbury and Evans responded by founding Once A Week, with veteran editor and abolitionist hero Samuel Lucas at the head. (Wikipedia)

(All images extracted from Cartoon Portraits and Biographical Sketches of Men of the Day (1873) housed by the Internet Archive, and donated by the University of Toronto).

Charles Darwin



Robert Browning



Gustave Doré



William Morris



Professor Owen



Benjamin D’Israeli



A.C. Swinburne



Wilkie Collins



Alfred Tennyson



John Ruskin



Mark Twain



H.M Stanley



Matthew Arnold



George MacDonald













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