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Selection from Wellcome Library’s release of 100k openly licensed images

- January 20, 2014 in collections, Digital Copy: Attribution, history of medicine, Images, Images-15th, Images-16th, Images-17th, Images-18th, Images-19th, Images-Science, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide, Wellcome Library

This morning the Wellcome Library announced its release of 100,000 of its historical images under an open license (CC-BY – meaning they are free for any re-use provided that the Wellcome Library is credited). The range and quality of the images released is phenomenal. The collection covers more than a thousand years of imagery relating to the history of medicine, including manuscripts, paintings, etchings, early photography and advertisements – from medieval Persian anatomy to the satirical prints of Rowlandson and Gillray. This move by the Wellcome is yet another recent example of a hugely respected institution releasing digitisations of its public domain content under an open license – with the last 6 months seeing The Getty and The British Library making similar moves. It’s a really promising sign of a more general shift toward opening up public domain content that we’ve seen taking place in the cultural sector over the last couple of years. Wonderful stuff! This selection from Wellcome’s release that we’ve chosen below is from just the first 1% of the 100,000 images made available. Remember, all are published under an CC-BY license so, if re-using, you must credit the “Wellcome Library, London”. Just click on the images […]

Fortunio Liceti’s Monsters (1665)

- November 20, 2013 in collections, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, Images, Images-17th, Images-Animals, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-People, Images-Science, Internet Archive, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide

Highlights from the illustrations in the 1665 edition of Fortunio Liceti’s De Monstris, originally published, without the illustrations, in 1616. Liceti’s work, although not the first on the topic of deformities in nature, was perhaps the most influential of the period. In the wake of the book there was a huge rise in interest throughout Europe in “monstrosities”: pygmies, supposed mermaids, deformed fetuses, and other natural marvels were put on display and widely discussed, becoming the circus freak-shows of their time. However, unlike many of his contemporaries Licenti did not see deformity as something negative, as the result of errors or failures in the course of nature. Instead he likened nature to an artist who, faced with some imperfection in the materials to be shaped, ingeniously creates another form still more admirable. ‘It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art,’ wrote Liceti, ‘because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.” Housed at: Internet Archive | From: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: Pending Clarification Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions […]

Ernst Haeckel’s Radiolaria (1862)

- September 19, 2013 in Biodiversity Heritage Library, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, ernst haeckel, Harvard University, Images, Images-19th, Images-Animals, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Science, radiolaria, Science, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide, zooplankton

According to Wikipedia Radiolaria are “protozoa of (diameter 0.1–0.2 mm) that produce intricate mineral skeletons, typically with a central capsule dividing the cell into the inner and outer portions of endoplasm and ectoplasm. They are found as zooplankton throughout the ocean, and their skeletal remains make up a large part of the cover of the ocean floor as siliceous ooze.” In 1862 the German biologist, philosopher and artist Ernst Haeckel published an image laden monograph on these microscopic organisms, turning his eye and exquisite line to their intricate and varied forms. For more on Haeckel check out our article “Ernst Haeckel and the Unity of Culture” by Dr Mario A. Di Gregorio, on Haeckel’s theory of “monism” which lies behind the mesmerising illustrations of his Kunstformen Der Natur. Housed at: Biodiversity Heritage Library | From: Harvard University Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, […]

The Belly of a Horse (1820)

- July 31, 2013 in anatomy, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, farrier, horse, horses, Images, Images-19th, Images-Animals, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Science, National Library of Medicine, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide

Anatomical diagram from William Carver’s Practical horse farrier, or, The traveller’s pocket companion: shewing the best method to preserve the horse in health; and likewise the cure of the most prominent diseases to which this noble animal is subject, in the United States of America : the whole being the result of nearly forty years’ experience, with an extensive practice, published in 1820. U.S. National Library of Medicine Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and […]

Pollen Up Close (1837)

- July 16, 2013 in Biodiversity Heritage Library, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Images, Images-19th, Images-Science, Internet Archive, Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Illustrations of various strains of pollen in extreme magnification, as featured in Ueber den Pollen (1837), a book by St. Petersburg based German pharmacist and chemist Carl Julius Fritzsche. For a key identifying each pollen type pictured see these descriptions (in German) Housed at: Internet ArchiveFrom: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign via Biodiversity Heritage Library Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions The Dartmouth Electron Microscope Facility at Dartmouth College produced this photograph showing pollen strains at similar magnifications to those shown in Fritzsche’s book (around 500 times magnification). HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter […]

The Corset X-Rays of Dr Ludovic O’Followell (1908)

- June 18, 2013 in collections, corset, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, fashion, health, Images, Images-20th, Images-Photography, Images-Science, medicine, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide, Wikimedia Commons, x-ray

X-Ray images of women wearing corsets from the second volume of the French doctor Ludovic O’Followell’s Le Corset (1908). Although Dr O’Followell was clearly keen to show the damaging impact of corsets on women’s health, he did not actually want the corset to be abolished, but was simply trying to encourage a less severe design. Dr O’Followell in fact continued to write a regular column for the deluxe corsetier’s magazine Les Dessous Elégance. Wikimedia Commons Found via: Retronaut Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver […]

Remmelin’s Anatomical ‘Flap’ Book (1667)

- June 11, 2013 in anatomy, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, flap book, Images, Images-17th, Images-Science, National Library of Medicine, remmelin, Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions

This volume is a rare edition in Dutch of the greatest of the anatomical ‘flap’ books. The work features three full-page plates with dozens of detailed anatomical illustrations superimposed so that lifting the layers shows the anatomy as it would appear during dissection. Although flaps had been used in printing before, Remmelin was the first to use them on this scale. Eight prints of the plates were produced then cut apart and pasted together to form the layers. The first authorized edition was printed in Latin in 1619 with the title Catoptrum Microcosmicum. The plates were printed in 1613, and the text without the plates was printed the following year, both without the consent of the author. Although Remmelin’s work was very popular and went through a number of editions, the format of the flaps was very delicate and not practical for the dissection room. Copies such as this one with all of the flaps intact are very rare. (Text from the NLM website) U.S. National Library of Medicine Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review [...]

Phrenology Diagrams from Vaught’s Practical Character Reader (1902)

- March 19, 2013 in character, collections, diagrams, Images, Images-20th, Images-People, Images-Science, Images: Miscellaneous, phrenology, pseudo-science, psychology

Illustrations from Vaught’s Practical Character Reader, a book on phrenology by L. A. Vaught published in 1902. As he confidently states in his Preface: The purpose of this book is to acquaint all with the elements of human nature and enable them to read these elements in all men, women and children in all countries. At least fifty thousand careful examinations have been made to prove the truthfulness of the nature and location of these elements. More than a million observations have been made to confirm the examinations. Therefore, it is given the world to be depended upon. Taken in its entirety it is absolutely reliable. Its facts can be completely demonstrated by all who will take the unprejudiced pains to do so. It is ready for use. It is practical. Use it. The theory that one can ascertain a person’s character by the shape of their features is disturbing to say the least. You can see the book in its entirety, including many more diagrams, over in our post in the Texts collection. (All images taken from the book housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the Library of Congress. Hat-tip to Pinterest user Lisa M. Finnegan.) HELP TO [...]

Medical Imagery of the 15th Century

- March 13, 2013 in anatomy, astrology, collections, Images, Images-15th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-People, Images-Science, medicine, medieval, zodiac, zodiac man

The following images are all taken from Tradition und Naturbeobachtung in den Illustrationen Medizinischer Handschriften und Frühdrucke vornehmlich des 15. Jahrhunderts (1907) by Karl Sudhoff – a book on the topic of medical illustrations in manuscripts and early printed books (primarily) of the 15th century. Included amongst the depictions are a few of the Zodiac Man (or homo signorum), a common figure in late medieval depictions of the body who had every part of his body linked with an astrological sign. See the book to learn from where each image has been sourced by Sudhoff, and if you speak German, to learn more about them. (The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the University of Toronto). DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable public good, and to curate and showcase the most interesting out-of-copyright works on the web. SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the [...]

Jehan Cousin’s Livre de Pourtraiture (1608)

- February 11, 2013 in anatomy, collections, geometry, Images, Images-16th, Images-17th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-People, Images-Science, proportion, the body

Selected images from a 1608 edition of Livre de Pourtraiture by Jehan Cousin the Younger (ca. 1522–1595), son of of the famous painter and sculptor Jehan Cousin the Elder (ca. 1490-ca. 1560) who was often compared to his contemporary, Albrecht Dürer. Just before his death, Jehan the Elder published his noted work Livre de Perspective in 1560 in which he noted that his son would soon be publishing a companion entitled, Livre de Pourtraiture. While there have been some reports that an edition of Livre de Pourtraiture was fist printed in 1571 and again in 1589, no copies appear to exist. Instead, the most likely first printing of the work was 1595 in Paris by David Leclerc, with woodcuts engraved by Jean Leclerc, just after Jehan Cousin the Younger’s death. The book is one of the most famous on the subject of artistic anatomy and was printed again and again into the late 17th century. (All images from the U.S. National Library of Medicine). DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable [...]