You are browsing the archive for Ireland.

John O. Westwood’s Facsimiles of Anglo-Saxon and Irish Manuscripts (1868)

- September 4, 2019 in book of kells, Ireland, Irish Manuscripts, medieval manuscript, Religion

Impressive Victorian lithographs of Anglo-Saxon and early Irish illuminated manuscripts from the dark ages and early medieval period.

John McCormack – Recordings: 1911-1940

- March 17, 2017 in ballad, Ireland, irish ballads, james joyce, John McCormack

The songs of one of Ireland's best known tenors, renowned for lending his superior diction and breath control to a whole range of operatic and popular songs.

John McCormack – Recordings: 1911-1940

- March 17, 2017 in ballad, Ireland, irish ballads, james joyce, John McCormack

The songs of one of Ireland's best known tenors, renowned for lending his superior diction and breath control to a whole range of operatic and popular songs.

Open Knowledge Ireland Summer 2016 Update

- September 14, 2016 in Chpaters updates, Ireland, network

This blog post is part of our summer series featuring chapter updates from across the Open Knowledge Network and was written by the team of Open Knowledge Ireland. What is OK Ireland and what do we do?   Open Knowledge Ireland is a team of 9 volunteers who envision an information age where everyone, not just a few,  has access to and the ability to use the massive amounts of information and data generated by entities such as our government or public service.   We believe everyone should have access to this information and data to be able to make better decisions, receive better services and ensure money is spent in the right places. Our goal is to make taxpayer-supported information openly available, so that it can be used and re-used without the public having to pay for it, again.   In so doing we want to ensure that vital research can happen. We want people to be able to leverage information to hold powerful institutions to account, whether in health care, the charity sector, or through Freedom of Information requests in the public service.   Past events:   In June we organised and ran an event dedicated to Knowledge Preservation in the 21st century: https://ti.to/open-knowledge-ireland/knowledge-preservation/ . The event was attended by 20 enthusiasts. Kalpana Shankar, Stan Nazarenko and Rufus Pollock shared their visions of how knowledge and information can and should be preserved today and what the current challenges are. (Photos https://www.flickr.com/photos/139932355@N08/sets/72157669330777481)   In August we were delighted to help our friends and colleagues from Open Street Maps to map the Kingdom of Lesotho. To see a list of our past events click here.   Current projects:   A notable highlight from the last few months has been our work on hospital waiting list data. For a more extensive look at the activities we have initiated, see here.   In May we presented the findings from our Hospital Waiting List Project at the all-Ireland conference ‘Knowledge For Health’ organised by the Institute of Public Health (IPH), which operates on both sides of the island of Ireland. The reason we took on this project is that people with illnesses requiring them to visit a hospital (bad enough in itself!) are currently waiting up to 18 months and more to be seen by specialist doctors and consultants. No one in Europe should have to wait so long for a consultation on what may prove to be a severe or life-threatening illness.   As a way of reducing waiting times to see specialist doctors in hospitals we would like waiting times to be publicly (= ‘openly’) available so that the public, journalists, and social media can hold service providers accountable where waiting times are unusually high. This would also allow experts to use the data and complete sophisticated problem analysis that could work to improve waiting lists. 27093030674_3d64d12f5b_z While advocating for open data, we realise that for the data to be useful and to help answer real questions, users need to be sure that the data is authentic and that it will be accessible tomorrow or ten years from now.  We believe that the InterPlanetary File System (IPFS) has great potential to facilitate the preservation of the authenticity and accessibility of public data. IPFS is a peer-to-peer distributed file system that seeks to connect all computing devices with the same system of files where each file is given a unique fingerprint called a cryptographic hash. IPFS  provides historical versioning (like git) and makes it simple to set up resilient networks for mirroring of data.   At the conference, we demonstrated that the hospital waiting list data could and should be permanently and publicly available via the IPFS. See here for the examples of hospital waiting list data we presented. (https://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmT66oHDwzb8dU5vnZt3Ez5aStcWCjbqjNE2pA25ShTjmM/)   What are we working on next:?   Plans for the future:
  • Hospital Waiting List: OK Ireland continues to work with the Irish government on making Hospital Waiting List data open, to linking it with Wikimedia Data, and applying it on the Open Street Maps. As all of us can and might become ill, we believe that making health data accessible and comprehensive to everyone is the best way to demonstrate the potential value of open data.
  We aim to get existing data on waiting times released into Data.gov.ie – to do so it is likely that a tender will have to be announced to get this work under way. We are therefore looking to draft what this work might look like and what a project plan & costs would look like.  
  • Developing a sustainable fundraising strategy: We are struggling, as are many non-profits, to secure funds. Are there proven methods & tools that the Open Knowledge International Network could share to support us in developing a strategic plan for fundraising? For example, how could we leverage prominent personalities on the global level locally? Where should a strategic fundraising plan focus? And how do we go about sustaining a constant output of fundraising applications?
27705489665_04a9d5b0f1_z   And our upcoming events:  
  • During Open Access Week (October 24–30, 2016) Open Knowledge Ireland and the Institute of Public Health (IPH)  are co-organising an event which is dedicated to Open Data, Open Access, and Social Justice. The event will take place on Tuesday, 25 October at Pearse Street Library. More information to follow.
  If you want to contact us:   If you found the above interesting and/or want to learn more about anything we talked about here, please feel free to email, tweet, or facebook us.   Twitter Facebook Email   To read more about Open Knowledge Ireland, visit their website.
Learn more about the Open Knowledge Network by visiting the Open Knowledge International website.

Open Knowledge Ireland Summer 2016 Update

- September 14, 2016 in Chpaters updates, Ireland, network

This blog post is part of our summer series featuring chapter updates from across the Open Knowledge Network and was written by the team of Open Knowledge Ireland. What is OK Ireland and what do we do?   Open Knowledge Ireland is a team of 9 volunteers who envision an information age where everyone, not just a few,  has access to and the ability to use the massive amounts of information and data generated by entities such as our government or public service.   We believe everyone should have access to this information and data to be able to make better decisions, receive better services and ensure money is spent in the right places. Our goal is to make taxpayer-supported information openly available, so that it can be used and re-used without the public having to pay for it, again.   In so doing we want to ensure that vital research can happen. We want people to be able to leverage information to hold powerful institutions to account, whether in health care, the charity sector, or through Freedom of Information requests in the public service.   Past events:   In June we organised and ran an event dedicated to Knowledge Preservation in the 21st century: https://ti.to/open-knowledge-ireland/knowledge-preservation/ . The event was attended by 20 enthusiasts. Kalpana Shankar, Stan Nazarenko and Rufus Pollock shared their visions of how knowledge and information can and should be preserved today and what the current challenges are. (Photos https://www.flickr.com/photos/139932355@N08/sets/72157669330777481)   In August we were delighted to help our friends and colleagues from Open Street Maps to map the Kingdom of Lesotho. To see a list of our past events click here.   Current projects:   A notable highlight from the last few months has been our work on hospital waiting list data. For a more extensive look at the activities we have initiated, see here.   In May we presented the findings from our Hospital Waiting List Project at the all-Ireland conference ‘Knowledge For Health’ organised by the Institute of Public Health (IPH), which operates on both sides of the island of Ireland. The reason we took on this project is that people with illnesses requiring them to visit a hospital (bad enough in itself!) are currently waiting up to 18 months and more to be seen by specialist doctors and consultants. No one in Europe should have to wait so long for a consultation on what may prove to be a severe or life-threatening illness.   As a way of reducing waiting times to see specialist doctors in hospitals we would like waiting times to be publicly (= ‘openly’) available so that the public, journalists, and social media can hold service providers accountable where waiting times are unusually high. This would also allow experts to use the data and complete sophisticated problem analysis that could work to improve waiting lists. 27093030674_3d64d12f5b_z While advocating for open data, we realise that for the data to be useful and to help answer real questions, users need to be sure that the data is authentic and that it will be accessible tomorrow or ten years from now.  We believe that the InterPlanetary File System (IPFS) has great potential to facilitate the preservation of the authenticity and accessibility of public data. IPFS is a peer-to-peer distributed file system that seeks to connect all computing devices with the same system of files where each file is given a unique fingerprint called a cryptographic hash. IPFS  provides historical versioning (like git) and makes it simple to set up resilient networks for mirroring of data.   At the conference, we demonstrated that the hospital waiting list data could and should be permanently and publicly available via the IPFS. See here for the examples of hospital waiting list data we presented. (https://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmT66oHDwzb8dU5vnZt3Ez5aStcWCjbqjNE2pA25ShTjmM/)   What are we working on next:?   Plans for the future:
  • Hospital Waiting List: OK Ireland continues to work with the Irish government on making Hospital Waiting List data open, to linking it with Wikimedia Data, and applying it on the Open Street Maps. As all of us can and might become ill, we believe that making health data accessible and comprehensive to everyone is the best way to demonstrate the potential value of open data.
  We aim to get existing data on waiting times released into Data.gov.ie – to do so it is likely that a tender will have to be announced to get this work under way. We are therefore looking to draft what this work might look like and what a project plan & costs would look like.  
  • Developing a sustainable fundraising strategy: We are struggling, as are many non-profits, to secure funds. Are there proven methods & tools that the Open Knowledge International Network could share to support us in developing a strategic plan for fundraising? For example, how could we leverage prominent personalities on the global level locally? Where should a strategic fundraising plan focus? And how do we go about sustaining a constant output of fundraising applications?
27705489665_04a9d5b0f1_z   And our upcoming events:  
  • During Open Access Week (October 24–30, 2016) Open Knowledge Ireland and the Institute of Public Health (IPH)  are co-organising an event which is dedicated to Open Data, Open Access, and Social Justice. The event will take place on Tuesday, 25 October at Pearse Street Library. More information to follow.
  If you want to contact us:   If you found the above interesting and/or want to learn more about anything we talked about here, please feel free to email, tweet, or facebook us.   Twitter Facebook Email   To read more about Open Knowledge Ireland, visit their website.
Learn more about the Open Knowledge Network by visiting the Open Knowledge International website.

Irish OGP Progress Report Launch: opening remarks by Paul Maassen

- March 14, 2016 in Denis Parfenov, Events, Ireland, IRM, IRM Report, Martin Wallace, midterm, OGP, OGP Ireland, OGPirl, open-government, opengov, Paul Maassen

ogp ireland

9 March 2016

The Printing House at Trinity College Dublin

Good evening ladies and gentleman,

I have been following the Irish journey in OGP since June 2012 when two active citizens came to me with the idea of campaigning for Irish participation in the partnership. With a smart advocacy strategy they managed to get more civil society interested and more to get minister Howlin interested. And the rest is history as they say. With Raj’s excellent report on the formal participation experience of Ireland in OGP to date as it’s history book.

Let me start with two complements. First, a complement for Ireland on not only producing a strong set of commitments, but also making very substantial progress on delivering them. And when I say Ireland I mean those actors in civil society and in government that made this happen. Second, a complement for Raj on his report. It is quite an achievement to capture a countries journey in OGP in general, but the Irish one is perhaps even more complex. I think you managed to capture the positives and the negatives well, naming what needs to be named, doing it elegantly without shying away.

I will try to do the same while framing Ireland’s performance within the partnership and making some suggestions.

FRAME

OGP now has 69 participating countries, over 100 Action Plans that combined have close to 2500 commitments. The last couple of months 25 reports have been released for public comments. Those reports cover 407 commitments in total. Action plans range from 4 commitments to 15 in general, but we did have cases like Ireland with 30 and Uruguay with 40. So Ireland is on the high end

If we look at ambition, and use starred criteria I can tell you that out of these 407 commitments 27 are starred (meaning measurable, relevant to open government values, potentially transformative and substantially of fully implemented. The stars per country range from 1 to 4 (only Ireland has 4 stars, 4 countries have 2 stars, 4 countries have 3 stars, 2 countries have 1 star).

On issues covered the trends are access to information and public accountability (based on the frequency of their relevance to OGP values.

In the bigger picture Ireland is doing well if you look at the commitments. Across the 30 commitments many are relevant, many are substantially of fully delivered, the plan covers a broad range of issues and not just politically easy ones. On the process side there is more to be done in Ireland – and not just in Ireland.

CONSULTATION

Trend is that countries are learning and complying better with the official OGP process requirements. We have seen improvements in all countries from first action plan to second. Meeting the requirements doesn’t necessarily mean a national process was of high quality though. As OGP we have realized that we have to revisit the requirements and bring in new elements that look at more qualitative aspects like the depth of the consultation – is civil society consulted or do they co-create with government, is the process open and inclusive or not? We also realized that one important factor for success is what we call the permanent dialogue mechanism a country puts in place. Raj calls it the Implementation Review Group. The name doesn’t matter. What is important is that there is a way to have a continuous dialogue between actors – not just for the development of a plan, but also for implementation and monitoring. The best examples we have are really where civil society and government co-create OGP in a space they manage together.

I actually thought the consultation for the plan in Ireland was pretty good. And I watched it very closely. Yes, there could have been more citizens in the room, yes it could have been taken outside of Dublin, yes, the government could have negotiated with civil society more directly at the political level about priorities. Yes civil society could have been more strategic in bringing the 62 recommendations down to 10 Big Asks. But at least there was a lively debate resulting in 62 asks, there was government funding for the consultation, there was feedback on the proposals made and many made it into the plan and minister Howlin did put his political weight behind OGP and behind the commitments.

A lot has been said about the way civil society works and works together. I don’t think I need to touch on that, except two things. I absolutely realize that for civil society to be actively engaged in something so important and so complex as changing the culture of government asks for resources. And in western countries it is almost inevitable that that funding comes from government. Second, I have seen Irish civil society smartly advocate and work together twice and got what they wanted as a result. First in getting Ireland into OGP, second in rallying together to get the FOI fees abolished. It shows it is possible and when it happens it can pay off.

RECOMMENDATION

Coming to a close with a few recommendations for the future of Ireland in OGP. And of course I realize you have just had elections and they have brought a bit of shake-up. And I also realize Raj has recommendations in his report. They all are very solid and important.

First, to open up government and change the culture is not a technical fix. It is much more complex and political. Look at the commitments on lobbying regulation or whistleblower protection. For OGP to stay relevant in Ireland it is imperative to have a political champion in the new government with the will and power to drive this agenda forward. This is an opportunity for civil society to take the initiative.

Second, if commitments are not delivered by June it is great to re-commit – or differently put – still deliver what you promise. This should not be an excuse to commit to new, bold and ambitious things that combat corruption, or promote the uptake of open data, or make public spending more transparent and accountable.

Third, there are a lot of commitments in the plan to do more about participation, whether around all new policies or at local level. Ireland has a lot of good experience and should build on that. Not in the last place to make the next action plan development process even better and more inclusive, really pushing the boundaries on co-creation. And doing it in a way that really adds value to the outcome and for the parties that invest time and energy. Let’s not create participation opportunities just for the sake of it.

Fourth: be a leader in OGP on some of the stuff you are really good at like whistleblowing and lobbying – and learn from others on topics you are struggling on. That is part of why you are in OGP.

And finally: get that permanent dialogue going between government and civil society. It is not that difficult. You have done it on different topics and at different moments. We have dozens of strong examples by now on how to do it – including on selecting the people at the table and shaping the rules of the dialogue.

Let me leave it here. As I said, I have been closely following the Irish path to government reform for the last 4 years and look forward to the next 4!

Paul Maassen, Director for Civil Society Engagement at the Open Government Partnership

More information:

Background:

 

 

 

 

Submission by Open Knowledge Ireland to the Public Consultation on Open Data Licences

- March 18, 2015 in DPER, Ireland, licence, OGP Action Plan, OKFN Ireland, Open Data Ireland, Open Knowledge Ireland, PSI, Public Consultation

Date: 18 March 2015 at 11:00
Subject: Submission by Open Knowledge Ireland to the Public Consultation on Open Data Licences
To: opendata@per.gov.ie
Cc: “open-data-ireland@googlegroups.com” <open-data-ireland@googlegroups.com>

< p dir="ltr">

Sir / Madam,

Please find attached the submission by Open Knowledge Ireland to the public consultation on open data licences.

Open Knowledge Ireland is very pleased at the Government’s decision to invite views on an open data policy for Ireland and the decision to review the Public Sector Information (PSI) licence.

Open Knowledge Ireland (OK Ireland) is a regional chapter of the Open Knowledge Foundation. The OK Ireland is at the forefront of Ireland’s Open Data community with the aim of developing a self-sustainable, enabling ecosystem for open data to empower citizens and organisations to make better informed, evidence-based decisions.

OK Ireland promotes open data culture through regular weekly, monthly and quarterly community engagements. Our events have been attended by thought leaders and notable civic activists.  Between October 2012 and January 2015, OK Ireland has successfully organised 15 community meetups, 5 hackathons, one Open Data training day and one OGP Civil Society day, with a total of over 1000 participants.We facilitate development of practical engagement with open data repositories. We organize training events, in which participants develop practical skills.

OK Ireland is supported by a number of organizations which make world-class technology resources available for fostering innovative projects. For example, CKAN, the world’s leading open-source data portal platform, was developed by the non-profit Open Knowledge Foundation and is today overseen and managed by the CKAN Association. CKAN is currently used by governments and organizations worldwide to power both official and community data portals, including the Irish Government Data Portal http://data.gov.ie/.

Members of OK Ireland are technology experts and experienced civic activists, with expertise in implementing the best global open data practices and tacit knowledge of unique challenges in Ireland. In September 2013, facilitated by a community engagement day, volunteers audited and catalogued datasets originally published by Irish government agencies. This exercise became a foundation for our input into the Global Open Data Census. At the same event, an Irish instance of CKAN, the worlds most advanced data repository, was deployed. For your convenience, the submission to the Public Consultation on Open Data Licences is also available online here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1QWL9U2_-lpEUsaV1wy6qt0iarU2_qmmvT17MFI7e_M0/edit?usp=sharing

Best regards,

Denis Our submission document: Submission by Open Knowledge Ireland to the public consultation on open data licences.pdf

First Irish Charity Data HackDay took place on Saturday July 26th 2014 at Tcube

- September 4, 2014 in Adrian Corcoran, Adrian O’Flynn, Allen Thomas Varghese, charity, Chris Garde, Data, Dave Corley, Denis Parfenov, Flora Fleischer, Grazia D'Aversa, Hackday, Helen Nic Giolla Rua, Ingo Keck, Ireland, Open Knowledge Ireland, Patrick Killalea, Salua Nassabay, Tracey P. Lauriault

Screen Shot 2014-09-04 at 13.27.58
When: Sat, 26th of July, 2014
Where: TCube kindly hosted the event to support the work done for the Charity sector
Organiser: Open Knowledge Ireland
Who: 13 participants: Dave Corley, Tracey P. Lauriault, Patrick Killalea, Adrian Corcoran, Allen Thomas Varghese, Ingo Keck, Helen Nic Giolla Rua, Adrian O’Flynn, Flora Fleischer, Denis Parfenov, Chris Garde, Grazia D’Aversa, Salua Nassabay
 
Main Findings from first Irish Charity Data HackDay
  1. No standardised way of tracking income and expenses
  2. Not all charities make income and expense data publicly available on their website
  3. When published, income and expense data is not published in an ‘open’ format
 
… and here is how it all went down on Saturday 26th July 2014 at Tcube:
The day started with a welcome speech by our conveners and hosts Denis Parfenov and Flora Fleisher of Open Knowledge Ireland.  A short presentation was given by Flora Fleischer. Adrian O’Flynn, our Charities Subject Matter Specialist, and the person who inspired the event, introduced the topic of spending for charities in Ireland. He highlighted recent issues portrayed in the media and explained why it would be useful for the public to be able to compare charities based on their financial reports.  Here is his presentation. Adrian Corcoran, the event’s project manager, provided detailed instructions on how to work together for the day.  He followed this outline (http://openknowledge.ie/chy-01-charity/)  
Three main datasets were used for the CharityHack:
  1. An overview working document listing basic data about the charities: (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1sIH9NKBkpQMFMnt_0sYW9B8DSyv839EbbtLmibdml1s/pubhtml).
  2. An excel spreadsheet (CharityFinancialDataFinal.xlsx), that includes detailed data for a number of charities, which were initially extracted from the annual reports by Adrian O’Flynn.
  3. A reference document which includes definitions of the codes used in the document above (e.g. expenditure codes)
    (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1sIH9NKBkpQMFMnt_0sYW9B8DSyv839EbbtLmibdml1s/edit#gid=861039018)
  Participants were divided into three teams “red”, “green”, “blue”, following the team label of the charities in the overview document.   Participants from each team picked a charity from the overview document.  Adrian Corcoran told us how to label the data, how to quality check the numbers within and how to verify the data with the annual reports. These data were then assembled into one shared document.  Data quality issues were reported and then corrected by Adrian Corcoran.   Any issues were reported during this process and the more serious problems were shelved for later. Once this work was completed, only data that passed data quality processes were included.  
The charity data used for this CharityHack exercise are as follows:
  1. Data were extracted from the annual financial reports of 24 of the largest charities in Ireland (€1Mil+).  NOTE This represents a small sample of the thousands of charities in Ireland.
  2. These are charities known through their public brand awareness for the fiscal year 2012 (see the definition).
  3. ONLY charities where funding represents charitable funds collected voluntarily from the public were selected.  This excludes charities that primarily rely on large institutional funds (e.g., Irish Aid Grants, HSE Grants).
  4. Only charities that have been independently audited and who have published their financial statements on a publicly accessible websites were used.
  5. Only charities who followed the Statement by the Accounting Standards Board on the SORP Accounting and Reporting by Charities: Statement of Recommended Practice were used (Section B: Resources Expended). Not all organizations in Ireland follow this standard. It is only because of this standard that it was possible to derive standardized financial data from the financial statements in the annual reports. The data here reflect resources spent on Governance, Fundraising and Charity.
  6. The list of charities was derived from the survey conducted by the Irish Charity Engagement Monitor (ICEM).
  7. This final dataset was quality checked by the participants at the 2014 Charity Hackday on July 26.
  8. The original dataset was created by Adrian O’Flynn.
  It is a small sample, but this illustrates the power of open data.   The dataset that was generated on the HackDay, and which is being continuously developed, can be found on the  Open Knowledge Ireland website. Finally a first draft of a future website was created, where charity data can be be displayed in an easy to understand fashion. Thanks to Barry Alistair (TCube), Adrian O’Flynn (Charity Subject Matter Expert), Adrian Corcoran (Project Manager), and Denis Parfenov & Flora Fleischer for organising the Charity HackDay. And many thanks to all the participants who lent their time and skills! We could not have made as much progress in one day without you!
Photo report of the day:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123736148@N04/sets/72157645554728899/ Pictures are courtesy of Dan Alexandru who kindly joined us on the day to capture all the fantastic work happening! Thanks Dan!

Irish Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform announces Government approval for removal of FOI application fee

- July 29, 2014 in FOI, Freedom of Information, Ireland, Nout van der Vaart, OGP Action Plan

[Written by Nout van der Vaart and originally hosted HERE. Re-posted with the authors permission] irish flag Two months after the European Regional Summit for OGP, Irish civil society welcomed a somewhat unexpected but not less celebrated achievement, as Brendan Howlin, Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform announced that the Government approved the removal of the €15 FOI application fee for non-personal FOI requests as part of a suite of reforms to Ireland’s FOI regime. During and right after the Summit there was no clear signal of the government reconsidering its stance on removing FOI fees – a point fiercely pushed for by Irish civil society through OGP – but two months later this development will be celebrated as a win for civil society. The Minister said:
Over the last number of months I have concluded that Ireland’s fees regime for FOI required a radical overhaul. The FOI fees measures which I am putting in place restore the balance in relation to FOI fees envisaged in that path-breaking legislation. These reforms will allow our citizens access to information on a level par with best practice across the OECD. After all, information and data are the currencies of the new age.”

He also referred to the Irish OGP Action Plan as a major contributing factor for his decision:
My assessment of FOI fees reform was strongly informed by the issues raised in the pre-legislative scrutiny of my proposals on FOI carried out by the Oireachtas Finance, Public Expenditure and Reform Committee the FOI Bill and the debate on the Bill during its passage through the Oireachtas, as well as the views of civil society participating to the preparation of Ireland’s Open Government Partnership National Action Plan. My conclusions were strongly reinforced by discussions I had with colleagues and participants at the OGP Europe Regional Conference held in Dublin Castle in May which highlighted the vital role of FOI as a cornerstone of openness, transparency and accountability of government and public administration”.
Although it took a while before this major development was eventually decided upon, after all we could say the Irish civil society lobby has been rather successful. With Ireland playing a major role as organizer of the Summit, civil society successfully seized the opportunity to start an effective lobby for abolishment of the fees. This case demonstrates the vast strategic opportunities for civil society to advocate for genuine open government reforms once their national governments play a leading role in OGP. On Wednesday, July 23rd, the first Irish National Action Plan was published, spanning three main areas: Open Data and Transparency, Citizen Participation and Strengthening Governance and Accountability. It can be found on Ireland’s country page on the OGP website. In reaction TASC, one of the organisations closely involved in the Irish OGP process, wrote a blog post commenting on the new Action Plan. < p class="entry-meta">