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People needs all kinds of Data for Innovation: 2nd Data Hackers Meetup

- July 9, 2015 in Adhuro, Data Hacker Nepal, Developer Nepal, javascript, KTMJS, Meetup, nepal, Parewa Labs

Recently formed Developer Nepal (DN): Data Hackers Group organized their second edition of Data Meetup on the date of 8th July 2015 at Parewa Labs, Kupondole, Nepal. The main aim of the meetup and the group was to bring Data Hackers “Who plays lot’s on different kinds of Data and Programming Languages like Python & JavaScript” at one place to plan somethings innovative and to share their problem & ideas. The plan of Developer Nepal (DN): Data Hackers Group  member is to organize informal Data Meetups on the regular intervals of time so, that everyone can be regularly informed & updated with the hackers / developers of Nepal. Entrepreneur of different Startups of Nepal joined the second edition of Data meetup, We the member of Open Knowledge Nepal also joined them so, that we can increase our contact with the Developer / Hackers of Nepal and can use their Knowledge for Open Knowledge Nepal upcoming projects. Our another aim of joining the meetup was to collect the views of the participant and know what kinds of data they currently are lacking and found difficult to collect. At the event Punit Jajodia, Co-founder of Parewa Labs also shared his experience, how the lack of Data hampers their marketing plan of their project named Adhuro.com and suggested all entrepreneurs participant to collect Data first while planning or executing somethings new because Data helps us to figure out your result at the very beginning. He also propose a project of collecting examination schedule data of different education sectors of Nepal and gave lots of advice regarding startup. Hope that project will start soon and we will also get chance of contributing cuz that project is going to be “Open By Default” so, that anyone from all around the world can use, reuse and redistribute it for their innovative ideas. Meanwhile DN: KTMJS is also organizing their 2nd meetup at Leapfrog, Time: 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM, Date: 11 July 2015, where you will receive a chance to meet and learn lots about JavaScript (One of the widely used programming language for data analysis and visualization) form Nepali JavaScript Developers.
Interested Join Them: http://www.meetup.com/KathmanduJS/events/221909484/ javameetupHope in the coming future also we can see more event and meetup from Developer Nepal.

People needs all kinds of Data for Innovation: 2nd Data Hackers Meetup

- July 9, 2015 in Adhuro, Data Hacker Nepal, Developer Nepal, javascript, KTMJS, Meetup, nepal, Parewa Labs

Recently formed Developer Nepal (DN): Data Hackers Group organized their second edition of Data Meetup on the date of 8th July 2015 at Parewa Labs, Kupondole, Nepal. The main aim of the meetup and the group was to bring Data Hackers “Who plays lot’s on different kinds of Data and Programming Languages like Python & JavaScript” at one place to plan somethings innovative and to share their problem & ideas. The plan of Developer Nepal (DN): Data Hackers Group  member is to organize informal Data Meetups on the regular intervals of time so, that everyone can be regularly informed & updated with the hackers / developers of Nepal. Entrepreneur of different Startups of Nepal joined the second edition of Data meetup, We the member of Open Knowledge Nepal also joined them so, that we can increase our contact with the Developer / Hackers of Nepal and can use their Knowledge for Open Knowledge Nepal upcoming projects. Our another aim of joining the meetup was to collect the views of the participant and know what kinds of data they currently are lacking and found difficult to collect. At the event Punit Jajodia, Co-founder of Parewa Labs also shared his experience, how the lack of Data hampers their marketing plan of their project named Adhuro.com and suggested all entrepreneurs participant to collect Data first while planning or executing somethings new because Data helps us to figure out your result at the very beginning. He also propose a project of collecting examination schedule data of different education sectors of Nepal and gave lots of advice regarding startup. Hope that project will start soon and we will also get chance of contributing cuz that project is going to be “Open By Default” so, that anyone from all around the world can use, reuse and redistribute it for their innovative ideas. Meanwhile DN: KTMJS is also organizing their 2nd meetup at Leapfrog, Time: 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM, Date: 11 July 2015, where you will receive a chance to meet and learn lots about JavaScript (One of the widely used programming language for data analysis and visualization) form Nepali JavaScript Developers. Interested Join Them: http://www.meetup.com/KathmanduJS/events/221909484/ javameetupHope in the coming future also we can see more event and meetup from Developer Nepal.

People needs all kinds of Data for Innovation: 2nd Data Hackers Meetup

- July 9, 2015 in Adhuro, Data Hacker Nepal, Developer Nepal, javascript, KTMJS, Meetup, nepal, Parewa Labs

Recently formed Developer Nepal (DN): Data Hackers Group organized their second edition of Data Meetup on the date of 8th July 2015 at Parewa Labs, Kupondole, Nepal. The main aim of the meetup and the group was to bring Data Hackers “Who plays lot’s on different kinds of Data and Programming Languages like Python & JavaScript” at one place to plan somethings innovative and to share their problem & ideas. The plan of Developer Nepal (DN): Data Hackers Group  member is to organize informal Data Meetups on the regular intervals of time so, that everyone can be regularly informed & updated with the hackers / developers of Nepal. Entrepreneur of different Startups of Nepal joined the second edition of Data meetup, We the member of Open Knowledge Nepal also joined them so, that we can increase our contact with the Developer / Hackers of Nepal and can use their Knowledge for Open Knowledge Nepal upcoming projects. Our another aim of joining the meetup was to collect the views of the participant and know what kinds of data they currently are lacking and found difficult to collect. At the event Punit Jajodia, Co-founder of Parewa Labs also shared his experience, how the lack of Data hampers their marketing plan of their project named Adhuro.com and suggested all entrepreneurs participant to collect Data first while planning or executing somethings new because Data helps us to figure out your result at the very beginning. He also propose a project of collecting examination schedule data of different education sectors of Nepal and gave lots of advice regarding startup. Hope that project will start soon and we will also get chance of contributing cuz that project is going to be “Open By Default” so, that anyone from all around the world can use, reuse and redistribute it for their innovative ideas. Meanwhile DN: KTMJS is also organizing their 2nd meetup at Leapfrog, Time: 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM, Date: 11 July 2015, where you will receive a chance to meet and learn lots about JavaScript (One of the widely used programming language for data analysis and visualization) form Nepali JavaScript Developers.
Interested Join Them: http://www.meetup.com/KathmanduJS/events/221909484/ javameetupHope in the coming future also we can see more event and meetup from Developer Nepal.

Data Roundup, 3 December

- December 3, 2013 in aids, australia, bushfire, charts, climate change, course, Data, Data Roundup, gender, inequality, infographics, javascript, Mapping, november, online, Roundup, top 5, Tutorial, tweets, World Bank

A course on online mapping, new visualization software, corruption perceptions data, bushfires in Australia through interactive maps, climate change effects infographics, the top 5 tweets of November in data visualization, a gift list for data lovers.

United Nations Photo – Climate Change Effects in Island Nation of Kiribati

Tools, Events, Courses If you are a wannabe mapper and you need to acquire skills to manage your digital exploration tools you might be interested in registering at the “Online mapping for beginner” course of CartoDB starting on December the 3rd. Hurry up: only few places left! Daniel Smilkov, Deepak Jagdish and César Hidalgo are three MIT students that developed a visualization tool called Immersion. Immersion helps you visualizing your network of e-mail contacts using only “From”, “To”, “Cc” without taking into account any kind of content. JavaScript is one of the most common programming language frequently used to create beautiful visualizations. Follow this tutorial from dry.ly if you want to learn it bypassing D3.js. Practice makes perfect! Data Stories Yesterday, Transparency International launched it’s annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) ranking countries according to perceived levels of corruption. Have a look at the results and see how your country ranks. Everyone knows what a bar chart is but have you ever heard about trilinear plots? This post from Alberto Cairo introduces a short consideration on new forms of data representations and on when to break conventions in information design. The goal of the Digital Methods Initiative of the Amsterdam University is to map and analyze causes, effects and possible future scenarios deriving from climate change. As part of this project, the students from Density Design Research Lab wrote a wonderful post outlining their visual design take on climate change. Gender inequality is one of those big issues which varies enormously from country to country. If you are wondering what countries have the worst gender gap a look at the map published on the Slate Magazine by Jamie Zimmerman, Nicole Tosh, and Nick McClellan. There are a lot of visualizations you can make from data coming from social networks, especially from those coming from the biggest one: Facebook. Take a minute to see those posted in this curious article from Armin Grossenbacher: “Visualising (not so) Big Data”. In Australia bushfires occur frequently. Look at the amazing interactive story that The Guardian published on their history, showing maps with data on temperatures, hectares of land burnt and number of properties damaged. Not everyone knows that we just passed the World Aids Day on the first of December. Tariq Khokhar reminds us the global situation of the disease in this article from the World Bank Data Blog. Data Sources Datavisualization.fr extracted the list of the 5 most influential tweets of November containing the hashtag #dataviz from a database of about 10.100 posts. Read it here and see who did best. Christimas is getting closer. If you need some good suggestions on what to buy to your friends and parents take a moment to read the FlowingData Gift Guide and you’ll find some interesting data-gifts for your data-lovers. flattr this!

An Introduction to Cargo-Culting D3 Visualizations

- September 2, 2013 in d3, HowTo, javascript, tech, Tinkering, underscore, visualisation



D3 is a fantastic framework for visualization – besides its beautiful outputs, the framework itself is elegantly designed. However, its elegance and combination of several technologies (javascript + svg + DOM manipulations) make it very hard to learn D3. Luckily, there is a huge range of D3 examples out there. Cargo-Cults to the rescue… Cargo Cults were the way Melanesians responded when they suddenly were confronted with military forces in the second world war: strangers arrived wearing colorful clothes, marched up and down strips of land and suddenly: parachutes with cargo-crates were dropped. After the strangers left, the islanders were convinced that, if they just behaved like the strangers, cargo would come to them. As the islanders, we don’t have to understand the intricate details of D3 – we just have to perform the right rituals to be able to do the same visualizations… Let’s for example try to re-create a Reingold-Tilford tree of the Goldman Sachs network.
Things I’ll work with:
The Reingold-Tilford tree example
the Goldman Sachs Network over at Opencorporates (you can get the data in their json format) The first thing I always look at is: how is the data formatted for the example: Most of the examples provide data with it that help you to understand how the data is layed-out for this specific example. This also means: if we bring our data into the same shape, we’ll be able to use our data in the example. So let’s look at the “flare.json” format, that is used in the example. It is a very simple json format where each entry has two attributes: a name and an array of children – this forms the tree for our tree layout. The data we have from Open Corporates looks different, here we always have parent and child – but let’s bring this into the same form. First, I’ll get the javascript bits I’ll need: d3 and underscore (I like underscore for its functions that make working with data a lot nicer), then I’ll create an HTML page similar to the example. I’ll check in the code where the “flare.json” file is loaded and put my own json in it (the one from opencorporates linked above) (commit note- that changes later on, since opencorporates does not do CORS…). I then convert the data using a javascript function (in our case a recursive one, that crawls down the tree)
 var getChildren = function(r,parent) {
    c=_.filter(r,function(x) {return x.parent_name == parent})
    if (c.length) {
      return ({"name":parent,
        children: _.map(c,function(x) {return (getChildren(r,x.child_name))})})
      }
    else {
      return ({"name":parent })
    }
  }
  root=getChildren(root,"GOLDMAN SACHS HOLDINGS (U.K.)")
Finally, I adjust the layout a bit to make space for the labels etc The final result on githubfull repository flattr this!