You are browsing the archive for Local group.

Interview with Mattias Axell, Community Manager and Experience Designer at Open Knowledge Sweden

- February 14, 2016 in Dee Hock, design, design thinking, DIKW, Epistemology, FrågaStaten, Freedom of Information, Knowledge Hierarchy, Local group, Longlivetheux, Mattias Axell, myndigheter, Open Data, open-government, Public Bodies, PublicBodies.org, quantified, research, stockholm, VISA, wikimedia

We met with Mattias Axell at the Royal Library in Stockholm where we talked about ‘data’ and especially ‘Open Data’. He answers questions about the the meaning, usage and effect of data. ‘Why and how is data important for our future societies’ or, is it really important? Mattias answered and explored the questions below. Mattias Axell is Community Manager at Open Knowledge Sweden and he is also working with the project FrågaStaten. Who are you? My name is Mattias Axell. I am a Kaospilot and aspiring Experience Designer. I have mainly studied in English since early teenage years and studied social science in high school. As far as I can remember I have always been very curious about how society works and how it can improve. I see myself as kind of a societal hacker. I want to understand this constantly changing system but realise it is extremely complex. So I engage to de-construct functions and processes in society to re-construct them in more purposeful, generative and sustainable ways which I hope will make a dent in the life of people in societies.
What does data mean? One allegory that I have heard about data is that it is like a natural resource similar to oil. But I would argue that it in comparison to a fossile energy source it is a renewable resource that is infinite and everywhere in the world. It is something that we can harvest and use for endless purposes. Data and information is said to be the oil of the 21st century but I prefer to compare it to renewable energy. Why? Because as soon as quantity and matters or something change, its properties and thus data change too.
We are living in the information age and we as individuals receive so much impressions and input every day. There are so many different sources of matters and things that we can quantify and analyse, but for that we need to understand perception. The first time I got in touch with this, epistemology, the philosophy of knowledge and the “knowledge hierarchy” was through Dee Hock, the founder of VISA. He shared a definition of knowledge in his phenomenal book “The Chaordic Age” from 1999 (later re-released as “One from Many: VISA and the Rise of Chaordic Organization” in 2005). Noise is the first step in the knowledge hierarchy. Noise is infinite, everywhere and it is is going on around us all the time. We make sense of it as different categories of data, emotions and sensory inputs. In a similar way we as humans have different ways in our societies to make sense of it all. This is done through our perception and tools we created that organizes data. The image of the “DIKW-pyramid (Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom Pyramid)” excludes noise so I quote an excerpt from Dee Hock’s book which describes it quite well.
“Noise becomes data when it has a cognitive pattern.
Data becomes information when assembled into a coherent whole, which can be related to other information. Information becomes knowledge when integrated with other information in a form useful for making decisions and determining actions.
Knowledge becomes understanding when related to other knowledge in a manner useful in anticipating, judging and acting.
Understanding becomes wisdom when informed by purpose, ethics, principles, memory and projection.” – Dee Hock, Founder and former CEO of VISA. Source.
From Wikimedia Commons by Longlivetheux with license CC-BY-SA 4.0

The “DIKW Pyramid”. From Wikimedia Commons by Longlivetheux with license CC-BY-SA 4.0

What is data consisted of? Is it only consisted of numbers, graphics and diagrams? As mentioned I believe that all data comes from noise we receive through our senses. I do not think it has to be mathematical things but maths helps us make sense. Mathematics is a social technology that humans early on constructed to make sense of quantities and more complex matters. E.g. if we start counting the amount of different kind of objects around us, then of course I naturally have to work with basic mathematics. However data can also be something about our feelings, e.g. designers work with it when they quantify something qualitative such as an emotion, which in itself is very difficult. How can you transform and value a feeling and convert it to a quantity? If I would work with design and development of a product, then I would ask people how they feel about this look of the product. However I believe that qualitative research often can be more powerful than quantitative research. However the choice between qualitative and quantitative depends on purpose.
What is the difference between data and information? As with the quote above, we can call data as the second step and the next step is information. You can gather and cross combine data with different kinds of data to get different information. In order to make sense of all the information it becomes knowledge when you have a fuller picture. That knowledge then leads you to understanding. You can then turn onto the ultimate step which is the wisdom when you have more philosophical values incorporated.
Can everyone understand the data easily? Everyone can work with data. But when you start getting into working with big amounts of data that can require a computer or other technological device – then a lot of people get excluded because the learning curve is too high. And then the process becomes more complex. In this sense not everybody can work with e.g. open data. That is why a lot of people today work on transforming data to the level of information. They transform it in a way that is easier for the recipient to make sense of. A sheet of “raw data” with lots of different data may not be so understandable in the beginning but when a person has made sense of it and, it could take a transformed and comprehensive shape in the form a blog, presentation or interview. How does the idea of open data come out? Today I think it comes out as very technically advanced – but it is not really. A lot of people involved are technical and communicate in a language that becomes filled with technical words. There are different aspects of it. Open Knowledge e.g. works with the aspect connected to the idea of transparency and open government and a more open democracy. Data is a very common resources in the public sector to create a foundation for the transparency into how society is doing and the situation of how public sectors are running. This also a way to create trust and citizen interaction where people can be creative, give feedback and scrutinize.
Why should open data exist as an idea and concept? Because in today’s very data-based society it is a kind of raw resource. E.g. if I need food, I need to have earth that I nourish to create conditions which are supports life and nutritious a harvest. I think the open data is an element in society that gives life to whatever I plant. So if I have an idea, I can use open data as facts to inspire and kind of nourishment to my idea, to make something more with it. It is also a source for creativity, so from open data I can actually get inspired, learn and harvest ideas. In that sense, open data also offers a space and playground for creativity which is why we today see a lot of so-called hackathons.
How does the system of open data work? This depends on how we define the “system” because there is so many systems and processes involved in it. Technically you must have a system, digital or analogue, that helps you collect data and one to help you harvest and organise the data. This can sometimes be called like washing the data, such as when you rinse vegetables to clean it from dirt and pesticides. Basically washing out the stuff that is not useful, or not in your interest at the moment. Then you can have a the system to manage the different data sets from where you can connect to other systems where you make the data available and open. Can you talk about your projects at Open Knowledge Sweden? My projects are mainly connected to the current 250th anniversary of Freedom of Press and Freedom of Information (or the Principle of Public Access as it also is called) in Sweden. The main one is called “Fråga Staten” which aims to create a proof of concept of how the Principle of Public Access can be more generative in the digital society. By creating a new user experience for people to exercise their right and freedom to request public documents in Sweden we hope to show why Sweden should strengthen and adapt Freedom of Information to our digital society. Along with researchers and entrepreneurs in the field I believe it creates a lot of value economically, socially and ecologically. The project as a concept is a digital platform which makes it easier for citizens to request public documents and data – and get answers from the public sector. I have been learning how to work with the raw data regarding the contact details of public bodies in Sweden. I found through an unsatisfactory experience that there are two different sources of contact data to all state agencies, regions and municipality. It was presented in quite an informative way, but in Sweden there is no single official source in the public sector that has all the raw data about these contact details. So I made a hack myself to create that. I collected all this information and with the help of the Open Knowledge network we combined it to a single spreadsheet of data. It will be available at PublicBodies.org and I hope that it is only a temporary solution until authorities start collaborate to make it open data themselves!
Along with this project I am also helping out a little bit in our Local Open Data Index project run by Asmen Gül which he will tell you more about if you get in touch with him.
Mattias Axell, source: Kaospilot

Mattias Axell, source: Kaospilot.dk

Technical Issues with Website / Tekniska Problem med Hemsida

- November 27, 2014 in Local group, stockholm

EN: We have technical issues with the website since a while back and we are trying to get it fixed. We ask of you to bear with us for now as the technicians are trying to solve the issue as soon as possible. Best regards, Open Knowledge Sweden
——————————————————————————————————————————-
SE: Vi har tekniska problem med hemsidan sen en tid tillbaka och vi försöker få det löst. Vi ber dig om din förståelse då våra tekniker försöker lösa ärendet så snart som möjligt. Vänliga hälsningar, Open Knowledge Sverige

Open Data Index 2014

- November 9, 2014 in General, International, Local group

ODI14-burkina

État d’ouverture des 10 jeux de données clefs

Cette année encore, l‘open knowledge a lancé la constitution de l‘index de l’open data. Cet index à pour objectif de faire l’état d’ouverture des données dans le monde à travers 10 jeux de données clefs:
  • Les horaires des transports,
  • Le budget de l’État,
  • Les dépenses de l’État,
  • Les résultats des élections,
  • Le répertoires des entreprises,
  • La carte nationale,
  • Les statistiques nationales,
  • La législation,
  • Les codes postaux,
  • Les émissions de polluants.
Pour que le Burkina Faso ne soit pas en reste, Open Knowledge Burkina et Burkina Faso Open Data Initiative (BODI), ont effectués le recensement pour le Burkina Faso. Compte tenu de l’effort du gouvernement pour la modernisation de l’administration, on remarque que la plupart des jeux de données est publié par défaut. Chaque institution à un site internet et s’efforce de publier ses données sur son site. Cependant, la publication ne tient pas compte de la réutilisation, ce qui fait que les données sont publiées dans la plupart des cas sous des formats PDF ou HTML, la cible étant l’utilisateur humain. En plus du format, la plupart des données publiées n’a pas de licence associé. Dans ce cas, l’utilisateur qui télécharge la données ne se vois pas explicitement autorisé à un type de réutilisation ni interdit à un autre. La loi statistique en son article 2 explique que la diffusion est la mise à disposition du public, par tout support autorisé par les textes en vigueur, des données statistiques produites; Mais elle ne précise pas ce que le « public » à le droit de faire ou pas avec les données. De même, la loi portant réglementation des services et des transactions électroniques au Burkina Faso, en son titre V (Mise à disposition par voie électronique d’information publique) précise ce que les administrations publiques doivent rendre disponible par voie électronique au public, sans faire cas des droits du public dans la réutilisation. Tout porte à croire qu’il y a une autorisation tacite à tout type de réutilisation mais il est important que ce droit soit opposable, d’où la nécessité de préciser explicitement ce que l’utilisateur à le droit de faire ou pas avec les données qu’il télécharge. Ce travail de recensement de l’état d’ouverture des données à le mérite de donner une cartographie de l’open data dans le monde, une base commune à partir de laquelle on peut comparer les pays. Elle permet aussi à chaque pays de voir où il est important d’agir; Au Burkina par exemple, on verra qu’il faut plus mettre l’accent sur les format des données et les licences que sur la publication elle-même.

Open Data Index 2014

- November 9, 2014 in General, International, Local group

ODI14-burkina

État d’ouverture des 10 jeux de données clefs

Cette année encore, l‘open knowledge a lancé la constitution de l‘index de l’open data. Cet index à pour objectif de faire l’état d’ouverture des données dans le monde à travers 10 jeux de données clefs:
  • Les horaires des transports,
  • Le budget de l’État,
  • Les dépenses de l’État,
  • Les résultats des élections,
  • Le répertoires des entreprises,
  • La carte nationale,
  • Les statistiques nationales,
  • La législation,
  • Les codes postaux,
  • Les émissions de polluants.
Pour que le Burkina Faso ne soit pas en reste, Open Knowledge Burkina et Burkina Faso Open Data Initiative (BODI), ont effectués le recensement pour le Burkina Faso. Compte tenu de l’effort du gouvernement pour la modernisation de l’administration, on remarque que la plupart des jeux de données est publié par défaut. Chaque institution à un site internet et s’efforce de publier ses données sur son site. Cependant, la publication ne tient pas compte de la réutilisation, ce qui fait que les données sont publiées dans la plupart des cas sous des formats PDF ou HTML, la cible étant l’utilisateur humain. En plus du format, la plupart des données publiées n’a pas de licence associé. Dans ce cas, l’utilisateur qui télécharge la données ne se voit pas explicitement autorisé à un type de réutilisation ni interdit à un autre. La loi statistique en son article 2 explique que la diffusion est la mise à disposition du public, par tout support autorisé par les textes en vigueur, des données statistiques produites; Mais elle ne précise pas ce que le « public » à le droit de faire ou pas avec les données. De même, la loi portant réglementation des services et des transactions électroniques au Burkina Faso, en son titre V (Mise à disposition par voie électronique d’information publique) précise ce que les administrations publiques doivent rendre disponible par voie électronique au public, sans faire cas des droits du public dans la réutilisation. Tout porte à croire qu’il y a une autorisation tacite à tout type de réutilisation mais il est important que ce droit soit opposable, d’où la nécessité de préciser explicitement ce que l’utilisateur à le droit de faire ou pas avec les données qu’il télécharge. Ce travail de recensement de l’état d’ouverture des données à le mérite de donner une cartographie de l’open data dans le monde, une base commune à partir de laquelle on peut comparer les pays. Elle permet aussi à chaque pays de voir où il est important d’agir; Au Burkina par exemple, on verra qu’il faut plus mettre l’accent sur les format des données et les licences que sur la publication elle-même.

Open Data Index 2014

- November 9, 2014 in General, International, Local group

ODI14-burkina

État d’ouverture des 10 jeux de données clefs

Cette année encore, l‘open knowledge a lancé la constitution de l‘index de l’open data. Cet index à pour objectif de faire l’état d’ouverture des données dans le monde à travers 10 jeux de données clefs:
  • Les horaires des transports,
  • Le budget de l’État,
  • Les dépenses de l’État,
  • Les résultats des élections,
  • Le répertoires des entreprises,
  • La carte nationale,
  • Les statistiques nationales,
  • La législation,
  • Les codes postaux,
  • Les émissions de polluants.
Pour que le Burkina Faso ne soit pas en reste, Open Knowledge Burkina et Burkina Faso Open Data Initiative (BODI), ont effectués le recensement pour le Burkina Faso. Compte tenu de l’effort du gouvernement pour la modernisation de l’administration, on remarque que la plupart des jeux de données est publié par défaut. Chaque institution à un site internet et s’efforce de publier ses données sur son site. Cependant, la publication ne tient pas compte de la réutilisation, ce qui fait que les données sont publiées dans la plupart des cas sous des formats PDF ou HTML, la cible étant l’utilisateur humain. En plus du format, la plupart des données publiées n’a pas de licence associé. Dans ce cas, l’utilisateur qui télécharge la données ne se voit pas explicitement autorisé à un type de réutilisation ni interdit à un autre. La loi statistique en son article 2 explique que la diffusion est la mise à disposition du public, par tout support autorisé par les textes en vigueur, des données statistiques produites; Mais elle ne précise pas ce que le « public » à le droit de faire ou pas avec les données. De même, la loi portant réglementation des services et des transactions électroniques au Burkina Faso, en son titre V (Mise à disposition par voie électronique d’information publique) précise ce que les administrations publiques doivent rendre disponible par voie électronique au public, sans faire cas des droits du public dans la réutilisation. Tout porte à croire qu’il y a une autorisation tacite à tout type de réutilisation mais il est important que ce droit soit opposable, d’où la nécessité de préciser explicitement ce que l’utilisateur à le droit de faire ou pas avec les données qu’il télécharge. Ce travail de recensement de l’état d’ouverture des données à le mérite de donner une cartographie de l’open data dans le monde, une base commune à partir de laquelle on peut comparer les pays. Elle permet aussi à chaque pays de voir où il est important d’agir; Au Burkina par exemple, on verra qu’il faut plus mettre l’accent sur les format des données et les licences que sur la publication elle-même.

Compte rendu de participation au OKFest 2014

- August 3, 2014 in International, Local group

IMG_20140715_172507

Banderole du OKFest14

  Comme en 2012 à Helsinki, cette année s’est tenu le festival sur la connaissance ouverte. C’est à cette occasion que se sont retrouvé au Kulturbrauerei à Berlin du 15 au 17 Juillet, des acteurs de l’open data du monde entier.
Grâce à une subvention de OK, d’une aide de ODI et de l’initiative Open Data du Burkina, j’ai eu la chance de participer à cette grande messe de l’open data. J’y étais avec d’autres membres de l’équipe de l’initiative Open Data du Burkina Faso. Le programme des travaux était très riche, riche à ne pas savoir quelle session choisir.     Le premier jour était consacré au lancement des activités à travers les mots des organisateurs et des sponsors, suivi du « open knowledge fair ». Le « open knowledge fair » est une sorte de foire lors de laquelle des projets open data occupent des stands afin de faire découvrir leurs travaux au public. Des bras robotisés aux programmes de training et de partage d’expérience, les projets étaient assez diversifiés. Avant le début du programme officiel qui était dans la soirée, le partenariat pour l’open data (Partnership for open data) à organisé une session intitulé « Open data innovators » de 09h à 12h. L’objectif ici était d’offrir une tribune aux initiatives qu’ils ont financées afin qu’ils présentent les travaux qu’ils ont réalisé jusque là, les défis auxquels ils ont fait face et les conseils qu’ils donneraient à ceux qui désirent se lancer dans l’open data.
Les intervenants venaient du Burkina Faso,de la Tanzanie, du Mexique et des Philippines.
IMG_1876

M. Malick Tapsoba, présentant le projet Open Data Burkina

C’est donc le deuxième jour, 16 juillet que commença officiellement les choses sérieuses. Malheureusement, je suis arrivé en retard le matin et n’ai pas pu participer ni au keynotes talks, ni le fireside chat avec Ory Okolloh que j’attendais pourtant avec impatience.
Les faits marquants de cette matinée sont les rencontres, notamment avec une équipe du Cameroun conduite par la toute nouvelle ambassadrice Ebo’o Agnès et Jean Brice Tetka. J’ai aussi fait une rencontre avec Prakash Neupane et Nurunnaby Chowdury, respectivement ambassadeur OK du Népal et du Bangladesh. C’était un véritable plaisir de voir de mes propre yeux ces visages que jusque là, je ne voyais que sur de petites cartes qui leur sert d’avatars.
En plus des rencontres, j’ai appris à créer des visuels qui permettent de transmettre des messages dans la rue. Ou en des termes plus compréhensibles, faire du graffiti. Merci à Bankslave, Swift et UhuruB pour cette session assez spéciale.
Graffiti "Hello World"

Graffiti « Hello World »

De 12h à 13h, il y avait plusieurs sessions auxquelles je voulais participer. Alors au lieu de choisir,j’ai décidé à mes risques et périls, de passer un peu de temps sur chaque session. C’est ainsi que je fis le tour des sessions suivantes:
  • Open government data update from around the world : Dans cette session, chaque pays était appelé à présenter ses activités dans le domaine de open data. 25 pays dont l’initiative open data du Burkina y ont présenté leurs travaux. Le Burkina est notamment revenu sur la conduite du projet, la mise en place de la plateforme et présenté le projet NENDO.
  • Defining and Designing Successful Data Journalism Initiatives in Developing Countries : Dans cette sessions, l’objectif était de permettre aux participants de partager leurs expériences sur des projets de data journalism qu’ils ont entrepris dans les pays en développement. Il fallait répondre aux questions suivantes :
      • Qu’avez vous essayé ?
      • Est-ce que ça a marché ?
      • Comment le savez-vous ?
      • Comment l’auriez vous amélioré ?
  • Bring the Public Domain Calculators Worldwide!: Le calculateur du domaine public est un projet de OK France, réalisé en collaboration avec le ministère français de la culture et de la communication. Son objectif est de faciliter à travers le traitement des métadonnées bibliographique, l’identification des œuvres dans le domaine public. Il à été présenté au festival afin de susciter son exploitation en dehors de la France.
Après cette série de session, c’était la pause déjeuner. Mais pas le genre de pause où on vous apporte tranquille le mangé avec les coca en pagaille!Non non. Il a fallut payer à manger et à boire. Alors après un hamburger et une brique d’eau très riche (d’après Mme Yonli) on est près pour les sessions de l’après midi.
A 14h, l’équipe du Burkina a eu une réunion avec l’équipe d’Etalab en Français pour des échanges sur des plans de coopération. La rencontre à durée 2h environ.
Pour les sessions qui commençaient à 16h30, j’ai adopté la même stratégie que dans la mâtiné (on ne change pas une équipe qui gagne!). C’est ainsi que j’ai pu participer aux sessions :
  • Can Open data Go Wrong : L’idée c’était de montrer des cas concrets de situations où l’exploitation de données ouvertes a conduit à des résultats opposés à ceux à quoi on s’attendait. Mais il y avait un problème de haut parleur et on entendait très faiblement ce qui se disait, vu que j’étais derrière. Donc Open data, je ne sais pas, mais la session gone wrong.
  • Humanitarian OpenStreetMap mapping workshop : Dans cette session une équipe de Humanitarian OpenStreetMap a présenté OpenStreetMap aux participants. Il était aussi question de partager les missions que HOT a déjà effectué sur le terrain et expliquer comment chacun peut contribuer. Il faut dire que la plupart de ce qui a été dit, je l’avais déjà entendu avec l’équipe local d’OSM-BF. Pour dire que leurs formations sont de niveau international.
  • Business Revenue Models for Open Data: Ici, il s’agissait de voir comment des entreprises peuvent faire du profit à travers Open data. Cette session offrait aussi la tribune à des entreprises faisant déjà du profit avec open data pour qu’ils présentent leurs business models.
    Ces entreprises, sont des intermédiaires. Cela veux dire qu’ils ne produisent pas eux-même les données, mais les exploitent pour fournir des services supplémentaires aux consommateurs.
    • Development Seed: Il crée des logiciels libres et utilisent les données ouvertes pour offrir des solutions pour le développement. Fait du profit à travers les consultations sur les outils qu’il conçoit.
    • Enigma: Met à disposition une plateforme qui offre des fonctionnalités de recherche avancée sur les données. Il offre des accès premium à des services haut de gamme qu’il crée avec les données. Les données brutes sont cependant en libre accès.
    • Mapbox : Permet aux utilisateurs de créer leurs propres cartes à partir des données provenant de OpenstreetMap. Un service premium et des cartes sur mesure pour de grands reutilisateurs comme foursquare.
    • Open Bank Project : Ce projet vise à offrir une API qui permet aux banques de proposer différents services à leurs clients. Leur business model est basé sur le support et des offres de maintient de la qualité de service.
    • OpenDataSoft : Propose une plateforme de données qui peut être utilisé pour des besoins internes ou ouverte au public. Accès libre pour les institutions académiques et les initiatives citoyennes. Offre premium au delà d’un certain nombre de jeux de données et d’appel de l’API.
    • Snips : Il propose une API de modélisation prédictive pour permettre de générer des solutions à partir des données. Il génère des revenus en vendant des applications et en réalisant des projets au profit de client ciblés.
Pour ce qui est des producteurs, l’open data peut permettre d’attirer des clients qui vont consommer des produits tiers. L’ouverture aussi permet d’améliorer les données ouvertes initialement, données enrichies que le producteur pourra réutiliser. Enfin, l’ouverture et la réutilisation des données peuvent permettre au producteur d’améliorer ses performances en identifiant des imperfections dans ses processus.
En sommes, le modèle économique du producteur est un modèle indirecte, en ce sens que de l’argent frais n’est pas directement généré.
Que ce soit pour les intermédiaires que pour le producteur lui même, l’élément centrale du business model est l’écosystème. Après ces sessions, on s’est retrouvé, avec d’autres festivaliers au soda club (même si on y vend que de la bière) pour des discussions à bâton rompu. Le dernier jour du festival, je suis venu assez tôt pour ne pas rater les keynotes talk.
La première keynoter était Neelie Kroes, commissaire européenne chargée de la société du numérique. Son intervention a portée sur le travail fait au sein de la commission de l’union européenne pour garantir que les données soit ouvertes. Ce travail est dans quatre domaines principalement :
  • L’ouverture des administrations européennes

  • L’ouverture dans le domaine de la science

  • La lutte pour la neutralité du Net

  • L’ouverture des ressources éducatives

Elle a été très éloquente et a demandé à tous les participants, d’où qu’ils viennent, de redoubler d’effort pour l’atteinte des objectifs.

Le deuxième keynoter était Eric Hysen de chez google, dont la participation a suscité l’indignation de certains festivaliers.

Dans son interlocution, Eric Hysen, a expliqué selon google, les points qui doivent être pris en compte pour la réussite d’une initiative open data:

  • En plus d‘être ouverte, les données doivent être à jour et sous licence,

  • Les données doivent être structurées,

  • Il faut se focaliser sur la construction d’un écosystème au lieux de penser à développer des applications.

Après les keynotes, j’ai participé à une session, entre 12h et 13h qui était intitulée : Transportation data: traffic and transit – different path, same result?

En rappel, les données du transit sont les données concernant les circuits et horaires des transports et les données du trafic sont les données sur l’utilisation des transports.
Différents projets ont été présenté dont le projet de cartographie des lignes de la SOTRACO que OK Burkina conduit en collaboration avec OSM-BF.

bikestorming from faso

Avec Mati Kalwill, animateur de l’atelier et Marcos Vanetta d’argentine

De 14h à 16h, il y a eu une rencontre entre l’équipe BODI et ses différents partenaires, pour faire des plans pour la suite du projet. Pendant les discussions nous avons eu la visite de Rufus Pollock, fondateur et président de OK. Il a beaucoup apprécié le travail que écosystème a fait, surtout en ce qui concerne le projet NENDO. Il nous a en outre exhorté à travailler davantage pour faire rayonner le Burkina par l’open data.

IMG_1922

L’équipe BODI et ses partenaires posent avec Rufus Pollock (le plus à gauche)

À 16h, j’ai participé à une rencontre entre le partenariat pour l’open data(POD) et les différents groupes locaux OK pour voir comment il pouvait les soutenir dans leurs activités. Il a été précisé pendant la rencontre que POD ne pouvait pas soutenir des projets de groupes locaux en particulier, mais plutôt des projets auxquels peuvent participer l’ensemble des groupes locaux.

Lors de cette rencontre, les participants ont commencé par discuter du programme de fellowship, puis ont plaidé pour la mise à disposition de fond pour permettre l’organisation d’activités. Compte tenu du fait que la salle dans laquelle nous étions devait être fermée, les participants ont proposé de continuer les discussions en ligne, sur le wiki.

Après cette dernière rencontre, c’était open bière jusqu’à la cérémonie de clôture qui s’est terminée en musique.

Compte rendu de participation au OKFest 2014

- August 3, 2014 in International, Local group

IMG_20140715_172507

Banderole du OKFest14

  Comme en 2012 à Helsinki, cette année s’est tenu le festival sur la connaissance ouverte. C’est à cette occasion que se sont retrouvé au Kulturbrauerei à Berlin du 15 au 17 Juillet, des acteurs de l’open data du monde entier.
Grâce à une subvention de OK, d’une aide de ODI et de l’initiative Open Data du Burkina, j’ai eu la chance de participer à cette grande messe de l’open data. J’y étais avec d’autres membres de l’équipe de l’initiative Open Data du Burkina Faso. Le programme des travaux était très riche, riche à ne pas savoir quelle session choisir.     Le premier jour était consacré au lancement des activités à travers les mots des organisateurs et des sponsors, suivi du « open knowledge fair ». Le « open knowledge fair » est une sorte de foire lors de laquelle des projets open data occupent des stands afin de faire découvrir leurs travaux au public. Des bras robotisés aux programmes de training et de partage d’expérience, les projets étaient assez diversifiés. Avant le début du programme officiel qui était dans la soirée, le partenariat pour l’open data (Partnership for open data) à organisé une session intitulé « Open data innovators » de 09h à 12h. L’objectif ici était d’offrir une tribune aux initiatives qu’ils ont financées afin qu’ils présentent les travaux qu’ils ont réalisé jusque là, les défis auxquels ils ont fait face et les conseils qu’ils donneraient à ceux qui désirent se lancer dans l’open data.
Les intervenants venaient du Burkina Faso,de la Tanzanie, du Mexique et des Philippines.
IMG_1876

M. Malick Tapsoba, présentant le projet Open Data Burkina

C’est donc le deuxième jour, 16 juillet que commença officiellement les choses sérieuses. Malheureusement, je suis arrivé en retard le matin et n’ai pas pu participer ni au keynotes talks, ni le fireside chat avec Ory Okolloh que j’attendais pourtant avec impatience.
Les faits marquants de cette matinée sont les rencontres, notamment avec une équipe du Cameroun conduite par la toute nouvelle ambassadrice Ebo’o Agnès et Jean Brice Tetka. J’ai aussi fait une rencontre avec Prakash Neupane et Nurunnaby Chowdury, respectivement ambassadeur OK du Népal et du Bangladesh. C’était un véritable plaisir de voir de mes propre yeux ces visages que jusque là, je ne voyais que sur de petites cartes qui leur sert d’avatars.
En plus des rencontres, j’ai appris à créer des visuels qui permettent de transmettre des messages dans la rue. Ou en des termes plus compréhensibles, faire du graffiti. Merci à Bankslave, Swift et UhuruB pour cette session assez spéciale.
Graffiti "Hello World"

Graffiti « Hello World »

De 12h à 13h, il y avait plusieurs sessions auxquelles je voulais participer. Alors au lieu de choisir,j’ai décidé à mes risques et périls, de passer un peu de temps sur chaque session. C’est ainsi que je fis le tour des sessions suivantes:
  • Open government data update from around the world : Dans cette session, chaque pays était appelé à présenter ses activités dans le domaine de open data. 25 pays dont l’initiative open data du Burkina y ont présenté leurs travaux. Le Burkina est notamment revenu sur la conduite du projet, la mise en place de la plateforme et présenté le projet NENDO.
  • Defining and Designing Successful Data Journalism Initiatives in Developing Countries : Dans cette sessions, l’objectif était de permettre aux participants de partager leurs expériences sur des projets de data journalism qu’ils ont entrepris dans les pays en développement. Il fallait répondre aux questions suivantes :
      • Qu’avez vous essayé ?
      • Est-ce que ça a marché ?
      • Comment le savez-vous ?
      • Comment l’auriez vous amélioré ?
  • Bring the Public Domain Calculators Worldwide!: Le calculateur du domaine public est un projet de OK France, réalisé en collaboration avec le ministère français de la culture et de la communication. Son objectif est de faciliter à travers le traitement des métadonnées bibliographique, l’identification des œuvres dans le domaine public. Il à été présenté au festival afin de susciter son exploitation en dehors de la France.
Après cette série de session, c’était la pause déjeuner. Mais pas le genre de pause où on vous apporte tranquille le mangé avec les coca en pagaille!Non non. Il a fallut payer à manger et à boire. Alors après un hamburger et une brique d’eau très riche (d’après Mme Yonli) on est près pour les sessions de l’après midi.
A 14h, l’équipe du Burkina a eu une réunion avec l’équipe d’Etalab en Français pour des échanges sur des plans de coopération. La rencontre à durée 2h environ.
Pour les sessions qui commençaient à 16h30, j’ai adopté la même stratégie que dans la mâtiné (on ne change pas une équipe qui gagne!). C’est ainsi que j’ai pu participer aux sessions :
  • Can Open data Go Wrong : L’idée c’était de montrer des cas concrets de situations où l’exploitation de données ouvertes a conduit à des résultats opposés à ceux à quoi on s’attendait. Mais il y avait un problème de haut parleur et on entendait très faiblement ce qui se disait, vu que j’étais derrière. Donc Open data, je ne sais pas, mais la session gone wrong.
  • Humanitarian OpenStreetMap mapping workshop : Dans cette session une équipe de Humanitarian OpenStreetMap a présenté OpenStreetMap aux participants. Il était aussi question de partager les missions que HOT a déjà effectué sur le terrain et expliquer comment chacun peut contribuer. Il faut dire que la plupart de ce qui a été dit, je l’avais déjà entendu avec l’équipe local d’OSM-BF. Pour dire que leurs formations sont de niveau international.
  • Business Revenue Models for Open Data: Ici, il s’agissait de voir comment des entreprises peuvent faire du profit à travers Open data. Cette session offrait aussi la tribune à des entreprises faisant déjà du profit avec open data pour qu’ils présentent leurs business models.
    Ces entreprises, sont des intermédiaires. Cela veux dire qu’ils ne produisent pas eux-même les données, mais les exploitent pour fournir des services supplémentaires aux consommateurs.
    • Development Seed: Il crée des logiciels libres et utilisent les données ouvertes pour offrir des solutions pour le développement. Fait du profit à travers les consultations sur les outils qu’il conçoit.
    • Enigma: Met à disposition une plateforme qui offre des fonctionnalités de recherche avancée sur les données. Il offre des accès premium à des services haut de gamme qu’il crée avec les données. Les données brutes sont cependant en libre accès.
    • Mapbox : Permet aux utilisateurs de créer leurs propres cartes à partir des données provenant de OpenstreetMap. Un service premium et des cartes sur mesure pour de grands reutilisateurs comme foursquare.
    • Open Bank Project : Ce projet vise à offrir une API qui permet aux banques de proposer différents services à leurs clients. Leur business model est basé sur le support et des offres de maintient de la qualité de service.
    • OpenDataSoft : Propose une plateforme de données qui peut être utilisé pour des besoins internes ou ouverte au public. Accès libre pour les institutions académiques et les initiatives citoyennes. Offre premium au delà d’un certain nombre de jeux de données et d’appel de l’API.
    • Snips : Il propose une API de modélisation prédictive pour permettre de générer des solutions à partir des données. Il génère des revenus en vendant des applications et en réalisant des projets au profit de client ciblés.
Pour ce qui est des producteurs, l’open data peut permettre d’attirer des clients qui vont consommer des produits tiers. L’ouverture aussi permet d’améliorer les données ouvertes initialement, données enrichies que le producteur pourra réutiliser. Enfin, l’ouverture et la réutilisation des données peuvent permettre au producteur d’améliorer ses performances en identifiant des imperfections dans ses processus.
En sommes, le modèle économique du producteur est un modèle indirecte, en ce sens que de l’argent frais n’est pas directement généré.
Que ce soit pour les intermédiaires que pour le producteur lui même, l’élément centrale du business model est l’écosystème. Après ces sessions, on s’est retrouvé, avec d’autres festivaliers au soda club (même si on y vend que de la bière) pour des discussions à bâton rompu. Le dernier jour du festival, je suis venu assez tôt pour ne pas rater les keynotes talk.
La première keynoter était Neelie Kroes, commissaire européenne chargée de la société du numérique. Son intervention a portée sur le travail fait au sein de la commission de l’union européenne pour garantir que les données soit ouvertes. Ce travail est dans quatre domaines principalement :
  • L’ouverture des administrations européennes

  • L’ouverture dans le domaine de la science

  • La lutte pour la neutralité du Net

  • L’ouverture des ressources éducatives

Elle a été très éloquente et a demandé à tous les participants, d’où qu’ils viennent, de redoubler d’effort pour l’atteinte des objectifs.

Le deuxième keynoter était Eric Hysen de chez google, dont la participation a suscité l’indignation de certains festivaliers.

Dans son interlocution, Eric Hysen, a expliqué selon google, les points qui doivent être pris en compte pour la réussite d’une initiative open data:

  • En plus d‘être ouverte, les données doivent être à jour et sous licence,

  • Les données doivent être structurées,

  • Il faut se focaliser sur la construction d’un écosystème au lieux de penser à développer des applications.

Après les keynotes, j’ai participé à une session, entre 12h et 13h qui était intitulée : Transportation data: traffic and transit – different path, same result?

En rappel, les données du transit sont les données concernant les circuits et horaires des transports et les données du trafic sont les données sur l’utilisation des transports.
Différents projets ont été présenté dont le projet de cartographie des lignes de la SOTRACO que OK Burkina conduit en collaboration avec OSM-BF.

bikestorming from faso

Avec Mati Kalwill, animateur de l’atelier et Marcos Vanetta d’argentine

De 14h à 16h, il y a eu une rencontre entre l’équipe BODI et ses différents partenaires, pour faire des plans pour la suite du projet. Pendant les discussions nous avons eu la visite de Rufus Pollock, fondateur et président de OK. Il a beaucoup apprécié le travail que écosystème a fait, surtout en ce qui concerne le projet NENDO. Il nous a en outre exhorté à travailler davantage pour faire rayonner le Burkina par l’open data.

IMG_1922

L’équipe BODI et ses partenaires posent avec Rufus Pollock (le plus à gauche)

À 16h, j’ai participé à une rencontre entre le partenariat pour l’open data(POD) et les différents groupes locaux OK pour voir comment il pouvait les soutenir dans leurs activités. Il a été précisé pendant la rencontre que POD ne pouvait pas soutenir des projets de groupes locaux en particulier, mais plutôt des projets auxquels peuvent participer l’ensemble des groupes locaux.

Lors de cette rencontre, les participants ont commencé par discuter du programme de fellowship, puis ont plaidé pour la mise à disposition de fond pour permettre l’organisation d’activités. Compte tenu du fait que la salle dans laquelle nous étions devait être fermée, les participants ont proposé de continuer les discussions en ligne, sur le wiki.

Après cette dernière rencontre, c’était open bière jusqu’à la cérémonie de clôture qui s’est terminée en musique.

Compte rendu de participation au OKFest 2014

- August 3, 2014 in International, Local group

IMG_20140715_172507

Banderole du OKFest14

  Comme en 2012 à Helsinki, cette année s’est tenu le festival sur la connaissance ouverte. C’est à cette occasion que se sont retrouvé au Kulturbrauerei à Berlin du 15 au 17 Juillet, des acteurs de l’open data du monde entier.
Grâce à une subvention de OK, d’une aide de ODI et de l’initiative Open Data du Burkina, j’ai eu la chance de participer à cette grande messe de l’open data. J’y étais avec d’autres membres de l’équipe de l’initiative Open Data du Burkina Faso. Le programme des travaux était très riche, riche à ne pas savoir quelle session choisir.     Le premier jour était consacré au lancement des activités à travers les mots des organisateurs et des sponsors, suivi du « open knowledge fair ». Le « open knowledge fair » est une sorte de foire lors de laquelle des projets open data occupent des stands afin de faire découvrir leurs travaux au public. Des bras robotisés aux programmes de training et de partage d’expérience, les projets étaient assez diversifiés. Avant le début du programme officiel qui était dans la soirée, le partenariat pour l’open data (Partnership for open data) à organisé une session intitulé « Open data innovators » de 09h à 12h. L’objectif ici était d’offrir une tribune aux initiatives qu’ils ont financées afin qu’ils présentent les travaux qu’ils ont réalisé jusque là, les défis auxquels ils ont fait face et les conseils qu’ils donneraient à ceux qui désirent se lancer dans l’open data.
Les intervenants venaient du Burkina Faso,de la Tanzanie, du Mexique et des Philippines.
IMG_1876

M. Malick Tapsoba, présentant le projet Open Data Burkina

C’est donc le deuxième jour, 16 juillet que commença officiellement les choses sérieuses. Malheureusement, je suis arrivé en retard le matin et n’ai pas pu participer ni au keynotes talks, ni le fireside chat avec Ory Okolloh que j’attendais pourtant avec impatience.
Les faits marquants de cette matinée sont les rencontres, notamment avec une équipe du Cameroun conduite par la toute nouvelle ambassadrice Ebo’o Agnès et Jean Brice Tetka. J’ai aussi fait une rencontre avec Prakash Neupane et Nurunnaby Chowdury, respectivement ambassadeur OK du Népal et du Bangladesh. C’était un véritable plaisir de voir de mes propre yeux ces visages que jusque là, je ne voyais que sur de petites cartes qui leur sert d’avatars.
En plus des rencontres, j’ai appris à créer des visuels qui permettent de transmettre des messages dans la rue. Ou en des termes plus compréhensibles, faire du graffiti. Merci à Bankslave, Swift et UhuruB pour cette session assez spéciale.
Graffiti "Hello World"

Graffiti « Hello World »

De 12h à 13h, il y avait plusieurs sessions auxquelles je voulais participer. Alors au lieu de choisir,j’ai décidé à mes risques et périls, de passer un peu de temps sur chaque session. C’est ainsi que je fis le tour des sessions suivantes:
  • Open government data update from around the world : Dans cette session, chaque pays était appelé à présenter ses activités dans le domaine de open data. 25 pays dont l’initiative open data du Burkina y ont présenté leurs travaux. Le Burkina est notamment revenu sur la conduite du projet, la mise en place de la plateforme et présenté le projet NENDO.
  • Defining and Designing Successful Data Journalism Initiatives in Developing Countries : Dans cette sessions, l’objectif était de permettre aux participants de partager leurs expériences sur des projets de data journalism qu’ils ont entrepris dans les pays en développement. Il fallait répondre aux questions suivantes :
      • Qu’avez vous essayé ?
      • Est-ce que ça a marché ?
      • Comment le savez-vous ?
      • Comment l’auriez vous amélioré ?
  • Bring the Public Domain Calculators Worldwide!: Le calculateur du domaine public est un projet de OK France, réalisé en collaboration avec le ministère français de la culture et de la communication. Son objectif est de faciliter à travers le traitement des métadonnées bibliographique, l’identification des œuvres dans le domaine public. Il à été présenté au festival afin de susciter son exploitation en dehors de la France.
Après cette série de session, c’était la pause déjeuner. Mais pas le genre de pause où on vous apporte tranquille le mangé avec les coca en pagaille!Non non. Il a fallut payer à manger et à boire. Alors après un hamburger et une brique d’eau très riche (d’après Mme Yonli) on est près pour les sessions de l’après midi.
A 14h, l’équipe du Burkina a eu une réunion avec l’équipe d’Etalab en Français pour des échanges sur des plans de coopération. La rencontre à durée 2h environ.
Pour les sessions qui commençaient à 16h30, j’ai adopté la même stratégie que dans la mâtiné (on ne change pas une équipe qui gagne!). C’est ainsi que j’ai pu participer aux sessions :
  • Can Open data Go Wrong : L’idée c’était de montrer des cas concrets de situations où l’exploitation de données ouvertes a conduit à des résultats opposés à ceux à quoi on s’attendait. Mais il y avait un problème de haut parleur et on entendait très faiblement ce qui se disait, vu que j’étais derrière. Donc Open data, je ne sais pas, mais la session gone wrong.
  • Humanitarian OpenStreetMap mapping workshop : Dans cette session une équipe de Humanitarian OpenStreetMap a présenté OpenStreetMap aux participants. Il était aussi question de partager les missions que HOT a déjà effectué sur le terrain et expliquer comment chacun peut contribuer. Il faut dire que la plupart de ce qui a été dit, je l’avais déjà entendu avec l’équipe local d’OSM-BF. Pour dire que leurs formations sont de niveau international.
  • Business Revenue Models for Open Data: Ici, il s’agissait de voir comment des entreprises peuvent faire du profit à travers Open data. Cette session offrait aussi la tribune à des entreprises faisant déjà du profit avec open data pour qu’ils présentent leurs business models.
    Ces entreprises, sont des intermédiaires. Cela veux dire qu’ils ne produisent pas eux-même les données, mais les exploitent pour fournir des services supplémentaires aux consommateurs.
    • Development Seed: Il crée des logiciels libres et utilisent les données ouvertes pour offrir des solutions pour le développement. Fait du profit à travers les consultations sur les outils qu’il conçoit.
    • Enigma: Met à disposition une plateforme qui offre des fonctionnalités de recherche avancée sur les données. Il offre des accès premium à des services haut de gamme qu’il crée avec les données. Les données brutes sont cependant en libre accès.
    • Mapbox : Permet aux utilisateurs de créer leurs propres cartes à partir des données provenant de OpenstreetMap. Un service premium et des cartes sur mesure pour de grands reutilisateurs comme foursquare.
    • Open Bank Project : Ce projet vise à offrir une API qui permet aux banques de proposer différents services à leurs clients. Leur business model est basé sur le support et des offres de maintient de la qualité de service.
    • OpenDataSoft : Propose une plateforme de données qui peut être utilisé pour des besoins internes ou ouverte au public. Accès libre pour les institutions académiques et les initiatives citoyennes. Offre premium au delà d’un certain nombre de jeux de données et d’appel de l’API.
    • Snips : Il propose une API de modélisation prédictive pour permettre de générer des solutions à partir des données. Il génère des revenus en vendant des applications et en réalisant des projets au profit de client ciblés.
Pour ce qui est des producteurs, l’open data peut permettre d’attirer des clients qui vont consommer des produits tiers. L’ouverture aussi permet d’améliorer les données ouvertes initialement, données enrichies que le producteur pourra réutiliser. Enfin, l’ouverture et la réutilisation des données peuvent permettre au producteur d’améliorer ses performances en identifiant des imperfections dans ses processus.
En sommes, le modèle économique du producteur est un modèle indirecte, en ce sens que de l’argent frais n’est pas directement généré.
Que ce soit pour les intermédiaires que pour le producteur lui même, l’élément centrale du business model est l’écosystème. Après ces sessions, on s’est retrouvé, avec d’autres festivaliers au soda club (même si on y vend que de la bière) pour des discussions à bâton rompu. Le dernier jour du festival, je suis venu assez tôt pour ne pas rater les keynotes talk.
La première keynoter était Neelie Kroes, commissaire européenne chargée de la société du numérique. Son intervention a portée sur le travail fait au sein de la commission de l’union européenne pour garantir que les données soit ouvertes. Ce travail est dans quatre domaines principalement :
  • L’ouverture des administrations européennes

  • L’ouverture dans le domaine de la science

  • La lutte pour la neutralité du Net

  • L’ouverture des ressources éducatives

Elle a été très éloquente et a demandé à tous les participants, d’où qu’ils viennent, de redoubler d’effort pour l’atteinte des objectifs.

Le deuxième keynoter était Eric Hysen de chez google, dont la participation a suscité l’indignation de certains festivaliers.

Dans son interlocution, Eric Hysen, a expliqué selon google, les points qui doivent être pris en compte pour la réussite d’une initiative open data:

  • En plus d‘être ouverte, les données doivent être à jour et sous licence,

  • Les données doivent être structurées,

  • Il faut se focaliser sur la construction d’un écosystème au lieux de penser à développer des applications.

Après les keynotes, j’ai participé à une session, entre 12h et 13h qui était intitulée : Transportation data: traffic and transit – different path, same result?

En rappel, les données du transit sont les données concernant les circuits et horaires des transports et les données du trafic sont les données sur l’utilisation des transports.
Différents projets ont été présenté dont le projet de cartographie des lignes de la SOTRACO que OK Burkina conduit en collaboration avec OSM-BF.

bikestorming from faso

Avec Mati Kalwill, animateur de l’atelier et Marcos Vanetta d’argentine

De 14h à 16h, il y a eu une rencontre entre l’équipe BODI et ses différents partenaires, pour faire des plans pour la suite du projet. Pendant les discussions nous avons eu la visite de Rufus Pollock, fondateur et président de OK. Il a beaucoup apprécié le travail que écosystème a fait, surtout en ce qui concerne le projet NENDO. Il nous a en outre exhorté à travailler davantage pour faire rayonner le Burkina par l’open data.

IMG_1922

L’équipe BODI et ses partenaires posent avec Rufus Pollock (le plus à gauche)

À 16h, j’ai participé à une rencontre entre le partenariat pour l’open data(POD) et les différents groupes locaux OK pour voir comment il pouvait les soutenir dans leurs activités. Il a été précisé pendant la rencontre que POD ne pouvait pas soutenir des projets de groupes locaux en particulier, mais plutôt des projets auxquels peuvent participer l’ensemble des groupes locaux.

Lors de cette rencontre, les participants ont commencé par discuter du programme de fellowship, puis ont plaidé pour la mise à disposition de fond pour permettre l’organisation d’activités. Compte tenu du fait que la salle dans laquelle nous étions devait être fermée, les participants ont proposé de continuer les discussions en ligne, sur le wiki.

Après cette dernière rencontre, c’était open bière jusqu’à la cérémonie de clôture qui s’est terminée en musique.

Ce que j’ai appris au OKFest 2014 à Berlin

- July 27, 2014 in International, Local group

Du 15 au 17 juillet 2014 dans la ville libre de Berlin, se sont retrouvé des passionnés d’ouverture de la connaissance (open knowledge en anglais) du monde entier pour partager leurs expériences et mieux établir des stratégies de collaboration.
J’ai eu le grand honneur d’y participer grâce à des financement de Open Knowledge, du Open Data Institute du gouvernement du Burkina Faso. J’y ai appris un tas de choses, dont je partage avec vous ici, les plus importantes :

1. Au Burkina, nous sommes logé à une bonne enseigne

Le gouvernement du Burkina a initié depuis 2012 un projet d’ouverture des données publiques pour des besoins de transparence, de participation citoyenne et de développement économique. En tant qu’acteur de la société civile Burkinabè, j’ai accueilli l’initiative avec beaucoup de joie, mais je n’imaginais jusque là pas la chance, que nous avions.
Au Festival, j’ai rencontré des ressortissants de pays où il est plus difficile d’accéder au données qu’au Burkina ; des pays où le gouvernement ne veut pas entendre parler d’ouverture, ce qui rend l’accès et la reutilisation des données vraiment problématique. Avec l’initiative Open data du Burkina, c’est l’État qui s’ouvre au citoyen et qui le poursuit pour qu’il vienne regarder les données. C’est l’État qui demande au citoyen d’utiliser les données et de les réutiliser afin de faire des choses utiles. Nous devons tirer le maximum de profit de cette initiative, que nous soyons journaliste ou étudiant, simple citoyen ou chercheur.

2. Nous devons financer nos projets locaux localement

En tant que groupe local OK, nous avons le réflexe de demander du soutien à d’autres structures à but non lucratif, souvent de niveau international pour financer nos activités. Il se trouve que les organisations à qui nous avons l’habitude de demander le soutien, le demande elles aussi à d’autre structures, auprès desquelles elles font le plaidoyer de la cause qu’elles défendent. Pour financer nos activités de façon durable, il serait bien que nous apprenions à lever des fonds localement. D’aucun dirait que les entreprises locales et les institutions ne contribuent pas, mais j’ai tendance à penser que c’est parce que nous manquons de les convaincre.  Nous avons besoin d’appendre les techniques du foundraising afin de pouvoir convaincre nos interlocuteurs de ce qu’ils gagnent à nous soutenir, parce qu’il faut le savoir, nul ne peut être mobilisé en dehors de ses intérêts. Les financements locaux nous permettent d’avoir une meilleure indépendance et de gérer nous même notre relation avec les partenaires. Pour vous donner un exemple, Le projet school of data a lancé un fellowship pour recruter des acteurs de l’open data qu’il allait former sur six mois. Il y avait 10 places disponibles et pour 5 places, il cherchait des personnes de pays bien déterminés (Tanzanie, Afrique du sud, Hongrie, Indonésie et Roumanie). Ce qui veut dire que si tu n’es pas de l’un de ces pays, tu te retrouves à compétir pour une place sur 5.
Lors de la rencontre entre groupes locaux OK à Berlin, certains candidats malheureux ont fait des commentaires sur le recrutement. Et c’est là, qu’un acteur du projet a expliqué que chaque fellow coûtait 20 000$ et qu’il était difficile de mobiliser des fonds. Il a conclu en disant que pour s’assurer d’avoir un fellow, chaque pays pourrait mobiliser lui-même les 20 000$, parce qu’avant tout, le school of data est comme une école.

3. Éviter les effet de mode, ça ne sert au final à rien

Il m’est arrivé de participer à des projets open data, ou d’initier des activités open data juste pour que mon pays soit cité parmi les pays qui sont actifs. Mais en réalité, cela ne sert pas beaucoup parce qu’après avoir eu les « applaudissement » internationaux, il sera difficile d’avoir un impact localement, compte tenu fait que notre objectif est déjà atteint. Ce que nous faisons doit être d’abord pour résoudre des problèmes réels et locaux. La reconnaissance internationale peut venir, mais si nous travaillons pour résoudre des problèmes réels et qu’on y parvient, même si personne ne reconnaît ni ne relaie ce que nous avons fait, on est fier d’avoir fait œuvre utile.

4. Nous avons besoin de davantage de persévérance dans nos projets

Au Burkina Faso, je connais beaucoup de personnes qui ont eu des idées de projets, mais qui n’ont pas pu dépasser l’étape d’idée. La plupart du temps, on à tendance a justifier notre abandon par l’absence de conditions favorables. Même si cela n’est pas faux, beaucoup de projets ne verront jamais le jour tout simplement parce que leurs géniteurs n’y croient pas assez fermement. La plupart des projets citoyens ou des produits d’entreprises présentés au OKFest ne sont pas plus spéciaux que les projets que nous avons souvent. La différence réside en la capacité des promoteurs à croire en leurs projets et à commencer à travailler dessus. Au fil du temps et de la confrontation avec la réalité, le projet subit des améliorations, des adaptations et fini par être LE produit que tout le monde cherchait sans le savoir. Je peux dire aussi que le manque de confiance en nos projets est lié à l’absence d’exemples proche de nous. Nous avons souvent besoin pour y croire d’avoir des exemples concrets de réussite, et de voir les jeunes déserter les écoles pour les sites d’orpaillage le démontre bien¹. Cependant, nous devons nous considérer comme des pionniers. Si nous refusons de faire l’expérience, nous courons le risque de manquer une grande occasion.  
  1. Dans certains villages, les jeunes quittent les écoles et occupent les sites d’orpaillage. Ils y creusent à corps perdu pendant des semaines, avec pour seule motivation, la moto qu’un autre jeune comme lui a acheté avec les revenus de l’or qu’ils a trouvés en creusant.

Ce que j’ai appris au OKFest 2014 à Berlin

- July 27, 2014 in International, Local group

Du 15 au 17 juillet 2014 dans la ville libre de Berlin, se sont retrouvé des passionnés d’ouverture de la connaissance (open knowledge en anglais) du monde entier pour partager leurs expériences et mieux établir des stratégies de collaboration.
J’ai eu le grand honneur d’y participer grâce à des financement de Open Knowledge, du Open Data Institute du gouvernement du Burkina Faso. J’y ai appris un tas de choses, dont je partage avec vous ici, les plus importantes :

1. Au Burkina, nous sommes logé à une bonne enseigne

Le gouvernement du Burkina a initié depuis 2012 un projet d’ouverture des données publiques pour des besoins de transparence, de participation citoyenne et de développement économique. En tant qu’acteur de la société civile Burkinabè, j’ai accueilli l’initiative avec beaucoup de joie, mais je n’imaginais jusque là pas la chance, que nous avions.
Au Festival, j’ai rencontré des ressortissants de pays où il est plus difficile d’accéder au données qu’au Burkina ; des pays où le gouvernement ne veut pas entendre parler d’ouverture, ce qui rend l’accès et la reutilisation des données vraiment problématique. Avec l’initiative Open data du Burkina, c’est l’État qui s’ouvre au citoyen et qui le poursuit pour qu’il vienne regarder les données. C’est l’État qui demande au citoyen d’utiliser les données et de les réutiliser afin de faire des choses utiles. Nous devons tirer le maximum de profit de cette initiative, que nous soyons journaliste ou étudiant, simple citoyen ou chercheur.

2. Nous devons financer nos projets locaux localement

En tant que groupe local OK, nous avons le réflexe de demander du soutien à d’autres structures à but non lucratif, souvent de niveau international pour financer nos activités. Il se trouve que les organisations à qui nous avons l’habitude de demander le soutien, le demande elles aussi à d’autre structures, auprès desquelles elles font le plaidoyer de la cause qu’elles défendent. Pour financer nos activités de façon durable, il serait bien que nous apprenions à lever des fonds localement. D’aucun dirait que les entreprises locales et les institutions ne contribuent pas, mais j’ai tendance à penser que c’est parce que nous manquons de les convaincre.  Nous avons besoin d’appendre les techniques du foundraising afin de pouvoir convaincre nos interlocuteurs de ce qu’ils gagnent à nous soutenir, parce qu’il faut le savoir, nul ne peut être mobilisé en dehors de ses intérêts. Les financements locaux nous permettent d’avoir une meilleure indépendance et de gérer nous même notre relation avec les partenaires. Pour vous donner un exemple, Le projet school of data a lancé un fellowship pour recruter des acteurs de l’open data qu’il allait former sur six mois. Il y avait 10 places disponibles et pour 5 places, il cherchait des personnes de pays bien déterminés (Tanzanie, Afrique du sud, Hongrie, Indonésie et Roumanie). Ce qui veut dire que si tu n’es pas de l’un de ces pays, tu te retrouves à compétir pour une place sur 5.
Lors de la rencontre entre groupes locaux OK à Berlin, certains candidats malheureux ont fait des commentaires sur le recrutement. Et c’est là, qu’un acteur du projet a expliqué que chaque fellow coûtait 20 000$ et qu’il était difficile de mobiliser des fonds. Il a conclu en disant que pour s’assurer d’avoir un fellow, chaque pays pourrait mobiliser lui-même les 20 000$, parce qu’avant tout, le school of data est comme une école.

3. Éviter les effet de mode, ça ne sert au final à rien

Il m’est arrivé de participer à des projets open data, ou d’initier des activités open data juste pour que mon pays soit cité parmi les pays qui sont actifs. Mais en réalité, cela ne sert pas beaucoup parce qu’après avoir eu les « applaudissement » internationaux, il sera difficile d’avoir un impact localement, compte tenu fait que notre objectif est déjà atteint. Ce que nous faisons doit être d’abord pour résoudre des problèmes réels et locaux. La reconnaissance internationale peut venir, mais si nous travaillons pour résoudre des problèmes réels et qu’on y parvient, même si personne ne reconnaît ni ne relaie ce que nous avons fait, on est fier d’avoir fait œuvre utile.

4. Nous avons besoin de davantage de persévérance dans nos projets

Au Burkina Faso, je connais beaucoup de personnes qui ont eu des idées de projets, mais qui n’ont pas pu dépasser l’étape d’idée. La plupart du temps, on à tendance a justifier notre abandon par l’absence de conditions favorables. Même si cela n’est pas faux, beaucoup de projets ne verront jamais le jour tout simplement parce que leurs géniteurs n’y croient pas assez fermement. La plupart des projets citoyens ou des produits d’entreprises présentés au OKFest ne sont pas plus spéciaux que les projets que nous avons souvent. La différence réside en la capacité des promoteurs à croire en leurs projets et à commencer à travailler dessus. Au fil du temps et de la confrontation avec la réalité, le projet subit des améliorations, des adaptations et fini par être LE produit que tout le monde cherchait sans le savoir. Je peux dire aussi que le manque de confiance en nos projets est lié à l’absence d’exemples proche de nous. Nous avons souvent besoin pour y croire d’avoir des exemples concrets de réussite, et de voir les jeunes déserter les écoles pour les sites d’orpaillage le démontre bien¹. Cependant, nous devons nous considérer comme des pionniers. Si nous refusons de faire l’expérience, nous courons le risque de manquer une grande occasion.  
  1. Dans certains villages, les jeunes quittent les écoles et occupent les sites d’orpaillage. Ils y creusent à corps perdu pendant des semaines, avec pour seule motivation, la moto qu’un autre jeune comme lui a acheté avec les revenus de l’or qu’ils a trouvés en creusant.