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International Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 Part III: Exploring Value Creation through Transparency

- March 15, 2016 in AskTheEu, crowdsource, digitisation, Freedom of Information, Global Open Data Index, godi, Local Open Data Index, LODI, Offentlighetsprincipen, Open Data Day, Wikimedia Sverige

This is the third part out of a four part series reporting on the International Open Data Day Stockholm 2016. Read part I here and II here.

< p style="text-align: center;"> Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 28 After the presentations at Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 we took a short break to have the first and essential break for “fika” having coffee, tea, cookies and cinnamon buns. With participants warmed up and inspired by projects there was a lot of chatting in the space. Following this we moved on towards workshop and demonstrations, e.g. having participants ideate and brainstorm on why open data for cultural heritage should be maintained and released. The FrågaStaten project were letting users test to request public documents from the EU institutions. FrågaStaten.se (to be launched) will help you to make Freedom of Information Access request and the platform publishes all requests and answers online. It can be said that it is a version of AskTheEu.org for the local context in Sweden.
Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 31 I personally sent a request during the test at AskTheEu.org and got my answer two days later. The only thing that you need to do is submitting your e-mail and create your own profile. Your information remains anonymous to the public bodies and you can use a pseudonym if you want or need – you have the right to. Then you can ask about whatever public document you want to request and you can also see all similar previous requests and questions. Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 29 Fascinating how easy it now can be to get information out that you did not have any idea about before! In the third workshop we were how to submit local and regional datasets to the Local Open Data Index – the next level of the Open Data Index. Are you interested to help crowdsource? Please do! Stay put for the next part of this four part series about International Open Data Day Stockholm 2016. Our blog post with the invitation to the event is published here.
The event on the wiki for OpenDataDay.org is located here. The International Open Data Day in Stockholm 2016 was held on 5th March at the Wikimedia Sweden offices hosted by Open Knowledge Sweden and Wikimedia Sweden.

International Open Data Day Stockholm 2016! Part II: Local Open Data Index makes Destinations more Attractive through Overview of Open Data Availability

- March 14, 2016 in crowdsource, digitisation, event, Global Open Data Index, godi, Local Open Data Index, LODI, Open Data Day, Wikimedia Sverige

This is the second part out of a four part series reporting on the International Open Data Day Stockholm 2016. Part I.

Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 14 First we were presented to the Global Open Data Index where you can see current state of open data release around the world. Now on this site you can compare between 122 countries. The Local Open Data Index was the next presentation. The municipalities and regions of Sweden are expected to have their relevant data indexed on this platform by crowdsourcing user submissions. One place to start to check  it could be possible to see the data in the charts. If you are planning to move somewhere in Sweden – it will a great source to help you decide which destination better meets your expectations and demand for level of service, transparency and digitsation. Stay put for the next part of this four part series about International Open Data Day Stockholm 2016. Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 05 Our blog post with the invitation to the event is published here.
The event on the wiki for OpenDataDay.org is located here. The International Open Data Day in Stockholm 2016 was held on 5th March at the Wikimedia Sweden offices hosted by Open Knowledge Sweden and Wikimedia Sweden.

International Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 Part I: How can one host an Inclusive Open Data Day?

- March 13, 2016 in AskTheEu, crowdsource, crowdsourcing, digitisation, eu, event, FrågaStaten, Global Open Data Index, godi, KÖK, Local Open Data Index, LODI, Open Data Day, Wikimedia Sverige

This is the first part out of a four part series recap from the International Open Data Day Stockholm 2016.

Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 37 The question of inclusivity was one of the questions explored this year in Stockholm by inviting people into the world of open data. The focus was on participation and user input for the projects that Open Knowledge Sweden and Wikimedia Sweden are running. The International Open Data Day in Stockholm 2016 was held on 5th March at the Wikimedia Sweden offices. It was a relaxed atmosphere and very casual event – yet very productive! The featured projects were FrågaStaten.se, Local Open Data Index with both regions and municipalities as well as the project on Connected Open Cultural Heritage Data (Kopplade Öppna Kulturarvsdata) (KÖK) in Swedish. Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 09 It all started off very calm and inviting with mingling as participants were arriving and the last preparation were taken care of. Then the workshop session started off with some welcoming words and a circle in a check-in letting participants share their names and answer the question: “Why are you here today?”. It was a diverse group of people who had come for different reasons all with diverse backgrounds three short presentations. It then followed with a 10-minute presentation from each featured project explaining their concepts and philosophies, introducing them to participants to get an insight of the projects. Stay put for the next part of this four part series about International Open Data Day Stockholm 2016. Open Data Day Stockholm 2016 25 Our blog post with the invitation to the event is published here.
The event on the wiki for OpenDataDay.org is located here. The International Open Data Day in Stockholm 2016 was held on 5th March at the Wikimedia Sweden offices hosted by Open Knowledge Sweden and Wikimedia Sweden.

Open Data goes local in Nepal: Findings of Nepal Open Data Index 2015

- January 7, 2016 in Local Open Data Index, OKF Nepal, Open Data Index

The Local Open Data Index Nepal 2015 is a crowdsourced survey that examines the availability of Open Data at city level. The survey was conducted for the first time in Nepal by Open Knowledge Nepal. See our previous post that announced the local index here.

Background

For the decentralization of power from central authority to district, village and municipality levels, Nepal government use Local Self Governance Regulation, 2056 (1999). where Village Development Committee (VDC) and District Development Committees (DDC) both act as planners and program implementing bodies of the government. Where municipalities are also doing the same kinds of tasks but at smaller scale, it has created difficulties in understanding layers of governing units. This overlapping of powers and roles has also been found in the government data space; average citizens still don’t know which local governance units are responsible for the data they need. This highlights the importance of a survey around open data and publishing. Global surveys such as the Global Open Data Index and Open Data Barometer taught us that availability of open data and participatory governance in Nepal is not reaching full potential in terms of everything from citizen readiness, to data release and data infrastructure in Nepal. Using World Wide Web Foundation terminology, in Nepal we are operating in a “capacity constrained” environment. Furthermore, in Nepal citizen participation and using open data often makes more sense and is more powerful at local level as it is local governments that handle all national and international project for citizens and generates data from it. However, open data is still a new concept in Nepal and the central government has only just started releasing data, with data even less available at the local level.

Why do we need a Local Open Data Index in Nepal?

The Local Open Data Index is intended to help to put the discrepancies of local level on the map (literally!). Peter Drucker said, “What gets measured gets managed.” Mapping the gaps will aid strategic planning and help create a framework for action and citizen engagement at all levels. For local governments to adopt openness, they need to understand the what, why and how of opening up their data. Government need to learn why making data open is not only a means to make them accountable (or worse – alarmed), but also a tool to help them become more efficient and effective in their work. Governments need to understand that opening data is only the beginning of participatory governance, and for them to participate they need well defined and easy-to-adopt mechanisms. The Local Open Data Index for Nepal will help in assessing the baseline of availability and nature of open data in Nepali cities. This will help to identify gaps, and plan strategic actions to make maximum impact. Nepal local Index visualisation

Summary

A survey was done in 10 major cities of Nepal by open data enthusiasts and volunteers inside and outside of Open Knowledge Nepal. The cities chosen were Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, Butwal, Chitwan, Dolakha, Dhading, Hetauda, Kavre, Lalitpur, and Pokhara. The datasets that we survey were Annual Budget, Procurement Contracts, Crime Statistics, Business Permits, Traffic Accident, and Air Quality. Unsurprisingly, the largest municipality and the capital of Nepal – Kathmandu – ranked highest, followed by Pokhara and Chitwan. Different datasets were available in all 10 cities in digital format on the government websites. All available datasets are free to access. However, none of the datasets were machine readable, nor were any datasets licensed with any of the standard open data licences. Datasets regarding annual budgets and procurement contracts are easily available digitally, although not open in standard sense of the term. Datasets for air quality are virtually nonexistent. It is not clear whether data is available in categories such as Traffic Accidents or Business Permits. The central government of Nepal has been slowly adopting open data as a policy, and has shown commitment through projects such as the Aid Management Platform, Election Data, and interactive visualization available in National Planning Commission website. The enthusiasm is growing, but, has not yet spread to local governing authorities.

Key Findings

  1. None of the data sets are completely open. All of them lack machine readability and standard licensing.
  2. Annual budget data is publicly available in almost all cities surveyed. Air quality data is not available in any city. Other datasets fall somewhere in between.
  3. The enthusiasm and progress shown by central government in terms of open data projects has yet to catch on at the local level.
Read more about it in the official white paper.