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With Lord Byron at the Sandwich Islands in 1825

- August 4, 2016 in George Gordon Byron, hawaii, James McCrae, King Kamehameha II, lord byron, Queen Kamamalu, Robert Dampier, sandwich islands

Journal of the Scottish botanist James McCrae recounting his 1825 voyage to Hawaii with the cousin of the poet Lord Byron.

With Lord Byron at the Sandwich Islands in 1825

- August 4, 2016 in George Gordon Byron, hawaii, James McCrae, King Kamehameha II, lord byron, Queen Kamamalu, Robert Dampier, sandwich islands

Journal of the Scottish botanist James McCrae recounting his 1825 voyage to Hawaii with the cousin of the poet Lord Byron.

With Lord Byron at the Sandwich Islands in 1825

- August 4, 2016 in George Gordon Byron, hawaii, James McCrae, King Kamehameha II, lord byron, Queen Kamamalu, Robert Dampier, sandwich islands

Journal of the Scottish botanist James McCrae recounting his 1825 voyage to Hawaii with the cousin of the poet Lord Byron.

Frankenstein, the Baroness, and the Climate Refugees of 1816

- June 15, 2016 in Baroness de Krüdener, Culture & History, famine, frankenstein, Literature, lord byron, mary shelley, refugee crisis, refugees, year without a summer

It is 200 years since The Year Without a Summer, when a sun-obscuring ash cloud — ejected from one of the most powerful volcanic eruptions in recorded history — caused temperatures to plummet the world over. Gillen D’Arcy Wood looks at the humanitarian crisis triggered by the unusual weather, and how it offers an alternative lens through which to read Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, a book begun in its midst.

The Poet, the Physician and the Birth of the Modern Vampire

- October 16, 2014 in Books, frankenstein, lake geneva, Literature, lord byron, polidiri, Religion, Myth & Legend, shelley, vampire, year without summer

From that famed night of ghost-stories in a Lake Geneva villa in 1816, as well as Frankenstein's monster, there arose that other great figure of 19th-century gothic fiction - the Vampire - a creation of Lord Byron's personal physician John Polidiri. Andrew McConnell Stott explores how a fractious relationship between Polidiri and his poet employer lies behind the tale, with Lord Byron himself providing a model for the blood-sucking aristocratic figure of the legend we are familiar with today.

Conversations with Lord Byron (1824)

- May 23, 2013 in byron, California Digital Library, collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, Internet Archive, lord byron, memoirs, texts, Texts: 19th, Texts: Non-fiction, Texts: Poetry, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide

Journal of the conversations of Lord Byron noted during a residence with his lordship at Pisa, in the years 1821 and 1822 by Thomas Medwin; 1824; Henry Colburn, London. On 17th May 1824, a month after Lord Byron died, his memoirs were burnt in the upstairs drawing room of a house on Albemarle Street, London. The manuscript pages of the memoirs had been entrusted by Byron to his literary executor Thomas Moore two years earlier with a mind that one day they would be published. But with Byron dead, Byron’s publisher John Murray, thinking the pages’ supposedly scandalous contents far too damaging to both the reputation and legacy of Byron himself and presumably also to the publisher who would publish them, ripped them up and placed them in the fire. In his book Journal of the conversations of Lord Byron noted during a residence with his lordship at Pisa, in the years 1821 and 1822 by Thomas Medwin, published that same year, the author endeavours to “lessen, if not remedy, the evil” of the burning of Byron’s memoirs. Housed at: Internet Archive | From: California Digital Library Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: PDF | [...]