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Asia-Pacific Open Science Call

- December 15, 2014 in Announcements, Featured, Meetings

Asia-Pacific_map1 We are pleased to announce our first ever open science working group call specifically for Asia-Pacific timezones!

Sunday 21 December, 8:00 UTC

(12:00 UTC+4 – 18:00 UTC+10)
Dial-in instructions will be posted on the wiki and call notepad prior to the call.

Check out the open science wiki for more details and please do add your details there, especially if you would be willing to help host a call. Massive thanks for Ranjith Raj Vasam for taking on the task of organising the first call. We look forward to seeing how the group shapes these calls going forward and look ahead to many more opportunities to bring together the open science community in the Asia-Pacific region.

Open Science at Tech4Dev 2014

- June 10, 2014 in External Meetings, Meetings, research

Winner of the #LavauxContest photo competition at #t4d2014 from @GabrielaTejadaG

Winner of the #LavauxContest photo competition at #t4d2014 from @GabrielaTejadaG

Denisa Kera and Sachiko Hirosue pulled together a fabulous session at Tech4Dev 2014 #t4d2014 at the SwissTech Convention centre in sunny Lausanne. The conference was organised by CODEV and the UNESCO Chair in Sustainable Technologies and focused on ‘What is essential?’ in technology for development. Many answers to this question discussed throughout the three days converged around collaboration with communities, with many sessions highlighting examples of co-design and co-creation across a range of technologies for development including water, energy, healthcare and ICTs for education. This recognition of and commitment to participation and collaboration in reseach for development relates strongly to work completed by the open science working group and the OpenUCT initiative funded by IDRC (documented here, working paper available online). The session ‘The Openness Paradigm: How Synergies Between Open Access, Open Data, Open Science, Open Source Hardware, Open Drug Discovery Approaches Support Development?’ covered a range of topics reflecting the breadth of practices that constitute open science but the two key areas of interest were open hardware for science and open data. First speaker up was Professor Irfan Prijambada from Gadjah Mada University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, who described the necessity of access to lab equipment for his microbiology research focused on agricultural practices and fermentation. Fermentation is important for alcoholic drinks but also the fermentation of cassava and rice to produce traditional Indonesian foods such as tapei. Further aspects of research in the Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology centre around soil and water microbiology, including biodegradation and bioremediation in volcanic soils. As any microbiologist knows, the ability to observe small lifeforms and a sterile environment in which to culture and work with them are the two most essential research requirements in the lab. Prof Prijambada described the resultant difficulties of performing research effectively when dealing with obsolete and inadequate research equipment, relying on out of date microscopes with no digital image collection and plating microorganisms on agar in open spaces next to a bunsen burner with no access to a clean hood or laminar flow hood, both standard pieces of equipment for maintaining a near-sterile environment and ensuring samples are not contaminated. To add to these difficulties, applying for funding for equipment procurement at the university can mean a 12 month wait for processing and delivery even if the application is approved. There was a clear need for cheap, rapid and local supply of essential kit.
miCAM v3.2 on display at Tech4Dev. Photo by Jenny Molloy, all rights waived under CC0.

miCAM v3.2 on display at Tech4Dev. Photo by Jenny Molloy, all rights waived under CC0.

Step in Hackteria.org. In 2009 after a workshop in Yogyakarta run by Marc Dusseiller, an active maker and advocate of DIY biology and open source hardware, Prof Prijambada and his lab set about taking a DIY approach to lab hardware by creating their own clean hood and laminar flow hood, initially using a glassfibre filter but now employing a series of HEPA filters. The equipment was constructed in only 2 months for less than 10% of the cost of a commercial equivalent (1.2m IDR vs 15m IDR). Microscopes were constructed from webcams in less that one month costing 750k IDR instead of 7m IDR and were entirely adequate for research needs. Not only adequate, but aquisition of digital images allowed an automated colony counter to be developed. The importance and utility of these microscopes was explained by their developer Nur Akbar Arofatullah, a researcher at Gadjah Mada University, who founded the Lifepatch initiative and along with other hardware projects, has improved the DIY microscopes to the stage where a company is now offering a commercial version of the latest MiCAM v3.2 for those who don’t find DIY appealing. However, hands-on construction remains a key part of the educational aims of open hardware and Lifepatch are using the microscopes and their construction for a range of workshops pitched at different educational levels. Kindergarten students compare the width of their hair in Cyber Hair Wars, elementary students learn about plant and muscle cells, high school students construct their own microscopes while their teachers are taught how to run workshops themselves. University students are enthused with the DIY spirit and encouraged to apply these principles in their own education and research. One area where Gadjah Mada University excels is community relations. Setting an example for all publicly funded research establishments, staff and students are expected and obliged to work with the community to achieve promotion within the university and there exists a dedicated Office of Research and Community Development. Within this ethos, DIY microscopes have been used to bridge knowledge between the university and community through workshops on sanitation and hygiene which make use of the microscopes and microbiology techniques to analyse water, take handswabs and analyse data on E. coli contamination. Lifepatch have run the Jogja River Project for several years, taking an integrative approach to water quality and river monitoring including participatory mapping and data collection on vegetation and animals all the way through to active clean up operations. Innovation in DIY hardware is rapid at Lifepatch and Gadjah Mada, with other projects including a vortex, rotator for incubating bacterial samples and a pipette stand. As per the example of MiCAM, the DIY approach is still compatible with commercialisation as people can buy pre-built hardware, thus offering the possibility of generating jobs and income but there are many questions around models for these activities which were of interest to the audience but could easily fill an entire session and were not covered in any depth (see reports here and here for an introduction). In a related talk during a later session at a beautiful UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Lavaux vineyards on the banks of Lake Geneva, Dara Dotz presented on 3D printing open hardware during another session which touched on the creation of jobs and hyper local digital manufacturing capacity in Port au Prince, Haiti. Dara travelled to Haiti for three weeks and ended up staying for a year working for an NGO. She observed problems in water treatment plants and in hospitals which were caused by a lack of supplies and particularly spare parts due to a broken supply chain including long shipping and customs quarantine times, a culture of bribes and poor transport links for distribution. After a friend attended the delivery of 5 babies in one evening and had no option for tying off umbilical chords but using her own gloves, Dara realised that her background interest and contacts in 3D printing could be used to solve some of the issues of obtaining plastic parts and consumables. Having brought a Maker-bot 3D printer into Haiti, Dara trained a group of Haitians with basic education to use the printers and 3D design software and several potential uses were identified, with critical application being umbilical chord clips, splitters for oxygen tubing to allow multiple patients to receive oxygen from the same cyclinder and IV bag hooks to reduce the use of large IV stands which blocked space in already overcrowded wards. 3D Printing Umbilical Cord Clamps for babies in Haiti! from Not Impossible on Vimeo. There were many considerations and design challenges to be addressed such as ensuring that designs addressed community needs and were designed with, by and for local people. In addition to empowering people to produce there own solutions to address real-time problems, the manufacturing method has the benefit of being on-demand, helping to ensure cleanliness of equipment, provides jobs and is also cheaper than importation of commercial equipment. Umbilical clips can be manufactured for $0.36 compared to $2.69 imported cost, representing a significant saving over time in this resource poor setting. Dara is now applying the same ideas to disaster zone supplies through the NGO fieldready.org and plans extensions to the Haiti project including importing CNC machines to allow manufacture of metal parts, creating a repository of designs for field supplies and increasing the use of recycled plastic waste for non-clinical devices and prototyping. The Open Source Hardware approach advocated throughout this session is supported by the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA), a non-profit aiming to raise awareness of OSHW and to spur innovation by hobbyists, commercial and academic users. Gabriella Levine is President of the OSHWA Board and an artist with an interest in snake biomimicry. She introduced two projects designed for sensing water quality and clearing oil waste – Protei and Sneel, a snake biomimetic robot designed iteratively by Gabriella and documented online. two sneels together playing from gabriella levine on Vimeo. PROTEI PRESENTATION VIDEO from toni nottebohm on Vimeo. These modular sailing and swimming robots allow sensors for oil, plastic waste,temperature, radioactivity and more to be attached and move through the water autonomously or via remote control, taking readings as they go. These concepts have been used in a range of water quality workshops and Gabriella runs hackdays exploring ideas around the design and deployment of water quality monitoring sensors and other hardware, including a water hackathon at Tech4Dev the following day! With a variety of DIY and OSHW approaches and designs being prototyped and promoted in areas as important as sensors and even medical devices, a major question becomes how to ensure that quality is consistent and devices work accurately and safely. The current systems of quality assurance regulations in various countries are often either complex, expensive, time-consuming and a massive barrier to market entry – or non-existent. Kate Ettinger is working to develop a system for collecting information on quality and accuracy of OSHW projects in an open and transparent way using an open source hardware/software data collection system and an open data approach to making information available. This framework could apply to many projects but Kate used the examples of neonatal incubators and prosthetic limbs, with data being collected to accelerate responsive design and ensure ‘integrity by design’ throughout the development and deployment of open source medical devices. OpenQRS in 30 Seconds from Kate Ettinger on Vimeo. From open data for open hardware to open data as a research tool, Nanjira Sambuli from iHub in Nairobi described the use of crowd sourced data during the Kenyan elections in 2013 and contrasted data collected from Twitter and other social networks via passive crowdsourcing with active sourcing organised by Ushahidi. Conclusions presented were that machine learning algorithms are necessary to make collection of large datasets from high volume social networks viable and that there were surprising patterns and voices gathered through passive listening rather than active calls for information. Nanjira presented a framework developed by iHub for election data crowdsourcing emphasising the three V’s – viability, validity and verification. jb_CrowdsourcingInfographice Integrity and curation of scientific data was also highlighted in the final talk by Scott Edmunds of GigaScience , during which he described some excellent case studies of the power of openness. One example was increasing the rapidity of disease research during the E.coli outbreak in Europe in 2011, where BGI rapidly sequenced and released the genome as open data. The image of the chromosome map was later chosen as the front cover of a major report from The Royal Society in the UK on openness in science. Another example looked at the great scope for crowd sourcing the collection and analysis of open datasets. Research on Ash Die Back, an invasive tree disease, demonstrated several flavours of citizen science from publicly contributed geo-tagged photos of infected trees for OpenAshDB to gamification of genome data analysis via the Facebook game Fraxinus. It is also clear that citizens are very keen to support local research that is important for them and wish data to be made public to enrich their scientific and cultural heritage. The Puerto Rican “People’s Parrot” genome project took an endangered and much loved national symbol and sequenced its genome to learn more about its uniqueness and evolutionary history. This effort was funded by fashion shows, art projects, concerts, a branded beer and public donations. Scott focused on these successes but also discussed the challenges in increasing open data release, including ensuring researchers get appropriate credit and are incentivised to make their data available.
The BGI sequenced chromosome of the German E.coli outbreak strain.

The BGI sequenced chromosome of the German E.coli outbreak strain.

A common theme running through the presentations was that openness can be effective at accelerating innovation and enabling research in resource-poor settings. In addition, the scope for education and democratisation of the scientific process through involvement of local communities in scientific research and technological innovation has variously led to employment, empowerment and increased opportunities. The challenge now is to establish under what contexts this remains true and work to advocate and support open approaches where they can offer benefits for scientists and citizens in the global South. I hope members of this working group and the rest of the global open science community will be able to contribute to this mission!

The Open Science Working Group Needs You!

- December 19, 2013 in Announcements, Meetings, Members

cropped-cropped-Option11.jpg The Open Science Working Group has had a great year, growing to over 630 members (!) on the mailing list and we now have local groups or representation in:
  • Sweden
  • Finland
  • UK (Oxford, London, Cambridge)
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • France
  • Brazil
  • US
Which is fantastic, but we’d love to expand further! If you would like to be an open science ambassador for your region/country/city/university then get in touch with science@okfn.org. To help us keep track of all these activities and make sure we’re being as effective as possible at providing a space for discussions and collaboration around open science, it would be great to hear from anyone who would like to be more involved in managing the working group.

You also might get to hang out with Chuff and this #animalgarden friends.

You also might get to hang out with Chuff and this #animalgarden friends.

We would like to put together a group of community organisers to contribute to a variety of roles. There can be a name for this group but we haven’t settled on one yet – suggestions welcome.The time commitment will be flexible and relatively low, roles and tasks might include:
  • Organising working group meetings
  • Planning open science events at OKFest 2014
  • Documenting events and updates from the working group
  • Coordinating specific projects or documents
  • Blog Editing
  • Tech/Dev Liaison
  • Event Organisation
  • Designing publicity materials and logos etc.



Do get in touch if any of this sounds of interest even if you are only able to contribute a small amount of time – we’d love to hear from you! Tweet us on @okfnscience or email science@okfn.org.


Open science & development goals: round up & the way forward

- September 23, 2013 in Collaborations, External Meetings, Meetings, research

This is a post by the team at OpenUCT (post by Sarah Goodier, photos by Uvania Naidoo) and will soon be published on the OpenUCT blog. Open science and development were the two key points that brought together a diverse group of over 20 scientists, methodological experts and researchers last week at the University of Cape Town. From the 12–13 September, these experts in their fields gathered for an IDRC OKFN-OpenUCT Open Science for Development workshop to scope possible research areas of open science for development. The focus was on research could be undertaken and to strengthen networks around this broad topic across Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. Day 1 involved discussions around opportunities and challenges for each of the regions represented as well as available resources that could be used and shared. By the end of the day, the group was starting to draw on these potential avenues for exploring open science for development to shape research questions. Continuing from day 1’s discussions, day 2 focussed on framing these research questions around open science for development. These questions were discussed by breakout groups who selected the top four out of the multitude of those suggested. This selection was no easy task in such a mixed bag of broad, conceptual questions and focused practical questions – a clear indication that there are many potential interesting research questions. day2_1 Four key questions emerged that were taken forward in further discussion:
  1. What value framework is a prerequisite for open science?
  2. How can open science support visibility and communication of science outside formal academic structures?
  3. How can open science create education?
  4. How can the economic and social value of open science be measured?
Projects that could help to answer these main questions were conceptualised and expanded upon. Some of the broad areas that the suggested projects could address included education, increased public involvement as well as the implication of open science on cost and building value. A regional focus for the suggested projects was thought to be best, largely due to financial and time limitations as well as co-ordination issues. The overarching IDRC-backed research programme will help to create and develop further synergies between any funded projects. day2_2 As part of maintaining the momentum created during over the course of the workshop, staying connected and growing the network by bringing other people with diverse perspectives on board are key actions going forward. All of us walked away from this workshop with a greater appreciation for open science and an understanding that, although diverse, open science is united by many similar practises across regions. We ended with more questions than answers at the end of the two days – just where you should be when you’re scoping possible research questions. What comes next is an OKFN working paper pulling together all the discussion threads, questions and resources raised over the two days, which will inform a call for research proposals for projects involving and investigating open science. Watch this space as open science spreads across the map! day2_3

Open science & development goals: shaping research questions

- September 13, 2013 in Collaborations, Events, External Meetings, Guest post, Meetings, research

This is cross-posted from the OpenUCT blog. What do we include in our definition of open science? And what is meant by development? Two key questions when you’re discussing open science for development, as we were yesterday on day one of the IDRC OKFN-OpenUCT Open Science for Development workshop. Participants from Africa, Asia and Latin America and the Carribbean have gathered at the University of Cape Town in an attempt to map current open science activity in these regions, strengthen community linkages between actors and articulate a framework for a large-scale IDRC-funded research programme on open science. The scoping workshop aims to uncover research questions around how open approaches can contribute to development goals in different contexts in the global South. Contextualization of open approaches and the identification of their key similarities and differences is critical in helping us understand the needs and required frameworks of future research. Several key themes, which generally provided more questions than answers, came up throughout a day packed of presentations, discussion and debate: strategic tensions, inequalities, global power dynamics, and the complexity of distilling common challenges (and opportunities) over large geographical areas. Some of the key strategic tensions identified include the balance between the “doing” of open science as opposed to researching it, as well as the tension between high quality research and capacity building at an implementation level. Both tensions are centred on inextricably linked components which are important in their own right. This brings up the question of where should the focus be? Where is it most relevant and important? The issue of inequality and inclusivity also featured strongly in the discussions, particularly around citizen science – by involving people in the research process, you empower them before they are affected. But this begs the questions: How open should citizen science be? Who takes the initiative and sets goals? Who is allowed to participate and in what roles? With regard to knowledge, a small number of countries and corporate entities act as gatekeepers of the knowledge produced globally. How should this knowledge be made more accessible? Will open scientific approaches make dialogue and knowledge distribution more inclusive? By the end of the first day’s discussion, the workshop had surfaced opportunities and challenges for each of the regions, but many questions still remain in terms of how to address the complex issues at hand and bring together the complex and disparate components of open scientific activity. Day two of the workshop will be focused on articulation of research problems, possible areas of activity and the structure of the envisioned research programme. Join the discussion via Twitter via #OpenSciDev. by SarahG (Pictures by Uvania Naidoo)

Open Science for Development

- July 20, 2013 in Announcements, Collaborations, Events, External Meetings, Meetings, research

OpenSciDev_logo We are delighted to announce that OKF is collaborating with the OpenUCT Initiative at the University of Cape Town in an International Development Research Centre funded project to develop a southern led research agenda for open science for development. We hope to use this as an opportunity not only to explore research into open science but also to really push community building efforts in the global south and identify a strong network of open science advocates and practitioners – maybe setting up some new local open science groups along the way! You can read more in our project proposal. A small group met in London last week to set the ground work for a larger workshop in Cape Town 11-13 September 2013 and the results of that meeting will be available online shortly. We hope you are as excited about this opportunity as we are and in the spirit of the exercise we will be making both the process and outcomes as open as possible. Therefore, if you would like to apply to participate in the Cape Town meeting please send jenny.molloy@okfn.org a brief half page introduction to yourself including answers to the following questions: Why is this project of interest? What expertise and experience do you bring? What would you like to see come out of this project? Preference will be given to participants from developing countries in order to further the aims of the project and full funding will be provided. There is a short deadline of 24 July 2013 so please spread this invitation through your networks, particularly contacts you might have in the global south. If selected, we will organise travel and flights as soon as possible. OpenSciDev_Funders

Citizen Science Hack Day

- May 3, 2013 in Announcements, Collaborations, Events, External Meetings, Guest post, Hackday, Meetings, research, tools

Cross posted from Medialab-Prado Dates: 17.05.2013 – 18.05.2013 Place: Medialab-Prado · Plaza de las Letras, C/ Alameda, 15 Madrid Come and join other citizen scientists, humanities folks, technologists, designers, students, scientists, and all who are curious for a two days of Crowdcrafting Citizen Science at Medialab-Prado, Madrid, Spain. We’ll be hacking together apps and projects with various open tools such as Epicollect, PyBossa and/or BOINC. The goal of the hackfest is to show the benefits that Citizen Science gives to citizens as well as professional scientists thanks to the new technologies. At the hackfest you will be able to learn about the tools used in volunteer sensing: data acquisition thanks to smartphones and gadgets for scientific projects, volunteer thinking: problem solving thanks to volunteers that collaborate in scientific projects using the web browser, and volunteer computing: where the volunteer donates his/her computer resources, (CPU idle cycles) to different projects. Registration required. foto ciencia ciudadana
Image by Daniel Lombraña (CC BY-SA 2.0)
  How it works?
  1. The first day, Friday 17, we will start with some short talks (around 10 minutes each) about different Citizen Science Projects and/or the technologies used in these projects.
  2. The second day, Saturday 18, you will be the main protagonists: the participants. In this second day we would like that you propose new projects or ideas around citizen science project that could be developed along the day (basically a prototype). You will have 5 minutes to engage the rest of the participants!
  3. We’ll invite you to ‘team-up’ around the ideas you’d like to help make happen, but feel free to ‘vote with your feet’ and join other teams at any stage of the day.
  4. At the end we’ll do a show and tell to see what folks came up with.

We will provide support for any teams who’d like to continue working on their projects or apps beyond the event!   What do I need to participate?

In principle you will only need a laptop, but feel free to bring any hardware, gadget, device that you think it is relevant for the hackfest and that could help in a citizen science project. For example, bring your own mobile phone (we will try EpiCollect in Android) as we will show how you can help in the acquisition of data, or an Arduino device that you have created, etc. In other words: bring any device that you think it will be useful for a citizen science project.

But if I’m not a scientist or a developer, how can I help? You are more than welcome! Actually your participation is really important. Why? Because this workshop is about Citizen Science, so we want your participation in the event and the projects. How? Well, it is easy, giving us feedback, ideas, suggestions about the projects and tools that we are presenting. Maybe you know different languages, so you can help translating a project, or maybe you are a designer so you could work with the scientists creating a really nice logo for the project. As you can see, you can help a lot!   What is Citizen Science Citizen Science is scientific research conducted, in whole or in part, by amateur or nonprofessional scientists, often by crowdsourcing data collection, problem solving & thinking. Formally, citizen science has been defined as "the systematic collection and analysis of data; development of technology; testing of natural phenomena; and the dissemination of these activities by researchers on a primarily avocational basis". Citizen science is sometimes called "public participation in scientific research."

Citizen Cyberscience leverages digital tools, mobile technologies and the web to involve citizen around the globe in the ‘formulating’ and ‘doing’ of Science.

Crowdcrafting tools provide online assistance in performing tasks that require human cognition, knowledge or intelligence such as image classification, transcription, geocoding and more.

Open Science means many things, but primarily scientific knowledge that people are free to use, re-use and distribute without legal, technological or social restrictions.   Organizers

Medialab-Prado Ibercivis The Citizen Cyberscience Centre

The OKF Open Science Group El Citizen Cyberlab Socientize
Sponsors

La Fundación Sloan

Weekly Citizen Science Hangouts

- April 3, 2013 in Announcements, Meetings

Capitalizing on the success of our recent CrowdCrafting hack day, from this Thursday and onwards every week we’ll be having a public Google+ Hangout to discuss citizen science and related topics. Details of the first meeting are below:

Thursday 4th April, 5pm (BST) – Weekly Citizen Science Hangout on Google+ here

In the first meeting we shall talk with special guest Michal Kubacki about his Misomorf application that may eventually be developed into a citizen app to help scientists with the graph isomorphism problem. This problem was proposed at the recent hack day by mathematician and quantum computing expert Simone Severini of UCL, who will also join the Hangout. Your participation at these weekly meetings is both welcome and encouraged. If you can’t make the first one, then perhaps the next?

Further information from the recent Science Hack Day

Among the many hack day projects I didn’t get to write about in the last blog post were the Yellowhammers project. This citizen science project uses sound recordings of yellowhammer (bird) dialects and is a joint activity of the Department of Ecology, Charles University in Prague, and the Czech Society for Ornithology.

Volunteers have helped both sample bird song, and classify these hundreds of hours of audio recordings into different dialects. Whilst the initial project sample birds just in the Czech Republic, the team are now expanding to try and capture bird song recordings from the United Kingdom and New Zealand where this bird species also lives.

Here at the Open Knowledge Foundation, we hope that the data collection and analysis could be aided by both the use our out Crowdcrafting.org platform and the EpiCollect mobile software. Work is presently under-way to make this a reality.

So whether, a software-dev, amateur scientist, tinkerer or twitcher – perhaps we might see you tomorrow at the Citizen Science Hangout?

 

Announcing Open Science Finland

- March 25, 2013 in Announcements, Guest post, Meetings

This is a guest post by Antti Poikola of Open Science Finland

Open Science Finland Group kickstarted in Tuusula Feb 2012.

Open Science Finland working group was kickstarted at the OKF Finland Convention in Tuusula 8-9.2.2013. The intense Round Table session attracted 15 open science enthusiasts despite being the last session of the evening and competing against the parallel sauna session! The working group was subsequently officially established under Open Knowledge Finland association (ry.). Finland has already seen activity in promoting open access. The Finnish open access group FinnOA, for instance, promotes openess across the whole spectrum of scientific knowledge production. Publicly funded “Tutkimuksen tietoaineistot” (Research Data Resources) project supports more open science policy and building of the necessary open research data infrastructure. A wider cultural change in the academic community is needed, however, to establish open practices as part of standard research practices. While many researchers favour open practices in science, truly coordinated efforts are still lacking at the national level. We believe that the strengthening the social networks through the open science network will facilitate the movement. Therefore, instead of focusing our limited resources to direct lobbying, we focus on community-driven activities and community building: we have established a (rather vibrant!) Facebook group for discussions and Kippt -linklist for sharing Open Science related links, and the group has rapidly grown to connect nearly 100 people. Some of our current key activities include preparation of Finnish teaching material on open research, research-oriented software libraries, and mapping of the scattered national activities around the topic. If you’re involved in research, working in Finland and/or just interested in the topic, don’t hesitate to join us!

#OKFest Open Science and Culture Hackday – Project 2 Louhos

- September 19, 2012 in Hackday, Meetings, OKFest, tools

Louhos have generated a tool called Sorvi with the aim of making R based statistical computational tools and methods traditionally used by scientists available for people wrangling all sorts of data sets from government and finance to weather and more. Sorvi combines these resources by providing a centralized collection of general-purpose open-source tools for data manipulation, analysis and and visualization. The project currently focuses on Finnish open data sets, but has far wider applications.

Members of the Louhos team hard at work.

The hackday project focused on formulating documentation that will be easy for newcomers and two use cases for a regular user and developer to illustrate the abilities of the tools. The team made significant advances in completing and improving documentation during the day, if you’d like to explore, check out the Louhos homepage and have a go with the tools yourself!