You are browsing the archive for muybridge.

Phenakistoscopes (1833)

- August 30, 2016 in muybridge, optical discs, optical toys, Phenakistoscopes, pre-cursor of film, Victorian technology

A popular Victorian parlour toy, generally marketed for children, which is widely considered to be among the earliest forms of animation and the precursor to modern cinema.

Phenakistoscopes (1833)

- August 30, 2016 in muybridge, optical discs, optical toys, Phenakistoscopes, pre-cursor of film, Victorian technology

A popular Victorian parlour toy, generally marketed for children, which is widely considered to be among the earliest forms of animation and the precursor to modern cinema.

Phenakistoscopes (1833)

- August 30, 2016 in muybridge, optical discs, optical toys, Phenakistoscopes, pre-cursor of film, Victorian technology

A popular Victorian parlour toy, generally marketed for children, which is widely considered to be among the earliest forms of animation and the precursor to modern cinema.

Tennis with Muybridge (1887)

- July 2, 2012 in early photography, Images, Images-19th, Images-Photography, Images-Science, muybridge, non-article, tennis

Plates 294 to 299 of Eadweard Muybridge’s groundbreaking collection from 1887 titled Animal Locomotion: an Electro-Photographic Investigation of Connective Phases of Animal Movements, a massive portfolio with 781 plates comprising of 20,000 photographs. In the preceding four years Muybridge made more than 100,000 images, working obsessively in Philadelphia under the auspices of the University of Pennsylvania. The vast majority of Muybridge’s work at this time was done in a special sunlit outdoor studio, due to the bulky cameras and slow photographic emulsion speeds then available. One of his favoured subjects to show the human form in locomotion was the tennis player. (Wikipedia)

(All images taken from the Boston Public Library via Wikimedia Commons – clicking on the images below will give you options for higher resolution versions).


Detail from plate 294




Detail from plate 294
















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The attitudes of animals in motion, illustrated with the zoopraxiscope (1882)

- November 4, 2011 in animals in motion, lecture, muybridge, non-article, royal institution, texts, zoopraxiscope


The Attitudes of Animals in Motion, Illustrated with the Zoopraxiscope, by Eadweard Muybridge; 1882; W.M.Clowes and Sons, London.

Published lecture given by the pioneering photographer Eadweard Muybridge on March 13th 1882 at the Royal Institution in London in front of a sell out audience that included members of the Royal Family, notably the future King Edward VII. He displayed his photographs on screen and described his zoopraxiscope, a device for projecting motion pictures that pre-dated the flexible perforated film strip.



Open Library link



Letters From a Cat (1879)

Castaway on the Auckland Isles: A Narrative of the Wreck of the "Grafton," (1865)


Infant's Cabinet of Birds and Beasts (1820)

Old French Fairytales (1920)

Armata: a fragment (1817)

An Account of the Late Improvements in Galvanism (1803)

The Medical Aspects of Death, and the Medical Aspects of the Human Mind (1852)

Quarles' Emblems (1886)

Cat and bird stories from the "Spectator" (1896)

Wonderful Balloon Ascents (1870)

The Book of Topiary (1904)

The Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (1899)

English as She is Spoke (1884)

The Danger of Premature Interment (1816)

The Last American (1889)

Pirates (1922)

Napoleon's Oraculum (1839)

Horse Laughs (1891)

Hydriotaphia/Urn-Burial and The Garden of Cyrus (1658)

Across the Zodiac: the Story of a Wrecked Record (1880)

Superstitions About Animals (1904)

The Diary of a Nobody (1919 edition)

The Attitudes of Animals in Motion, Illustrated with the Zoopraxiscope (1882)

The Eccentric Mirror: Reflecting a Faithful and Interesting Delineation of Male and Female Characters, Ancient and Modern (1807)