You are browsing the archive for #mysociety.

Help us find the world’s electoral boundaries!

- August 7, 2018 in #mysociety, Open Data Census, open data survey, open politics, politics

mySociety and Open Knowledge International are looking for the digital files that hold electoral boundaries, for every country in the world — and you can help.  Yeah, we know — never let it be said we don’t know how to party. But seriously, there’s a very good reason for this request. When people make online tools to help citizens contact their local politicians, they need to be able to match users to the right representatives. So head on over to the Every Boundary survey and see how you can help — or read on for a bit more detail.

Image credit: Sam Poullain

Data for tools that empower citizens

If you’ve used mySociety’s sites TheyWorkForYou — or any of the other parliamentary monitoring sites we’ve helped others to run around the world — you’ll have seen this matching in action. Electoral boundary data is also integral in campaigning and political accountability,  from Surfers against Sewage’s ‘Plastic Free Parliament’ campaign, to Call your Rep in the US. These sites all work on the precept that while people may not know the names of all their representatives at every level — well, do you? — people do tend to know their own postcode or equivalent. Since postcodes fall within boundaries, once both those pieces of information are known, it’s simple to present the user with their correct constituency or representative. So the boundaries of electoral districts are an essential piece of the data needed for such online tools.  As part of mySociety’s commitment to the Democratic Commons project, we’d like to be able to provide a single place where anyone planning to run a politician-contacting site can find these boundary files easily.

And here’s why we need you

Electoral boundaries are the lines that demarcate where constituencies begin and end. In the old days, they’d have been painstakingly plotted on a paper map, possibly accessible to the common citizen only by appointment. These days, they tend to be available as digital files, available via the web. Big step forward, right? But, as with every other type of political data, the story is not quite so simple. There’s a great variety of organisations responsible for maintaining electoral boundary files across different countries, and as a result, there’s little standardisation in where and how they are published.

How you can help

We need the boundary files for 231 countries (or as we more accurately — but less intuitively — refer to them, ‘places’), and for each place we need the boundaries for constituencies at national, regional and city levels. So there’s plenty to collect. As we so often realise when running this sort of project, it’s far easier for many people to find a few files each than it would be for our small team to try to track them all down. And that, of course, is where you come in. Whether you’ve got knowledge of your own country’s boundary files and where to find them online, or you’re willing to spend a bit of time searching around, we’d be so grateful for your help. Fortunately, there’s a tool we can use to help collect these files — and we didn’t even have to make it ourselves! The Open Data Survey, first created by Open Knowledge International to assess and display just how much governmental information around the world is freely available as open data, has gone on to aid many projects as they collect data for their own campaigns and research. Now we’ve used this same tool to provide a place where you can let us know where to find that electoral boundary data we need. Start here  — and please feel free to get in touch if anything isn’t quite clear, or you have any general questions. You might want to check the FAQs first though! Thanks for your help — it will go on to improve citizen empowerment and politician accountability throughout the world. And that is not something everyone can say they’ve done.

Open Data Day 2018 is here – Welcome to 3 days of #opendata learn, think and do!

- February 23, 2018 in #mysociety, avoin data, avoinglam, democracy, Events, Featured, GLAM, helsinki, mydata, Open Data, Open Data Day, projects, responsive, shortcut, tencent, whim, Wikidata, Working Group Meetup, Working Groups

    Learn, think and do #opendata 360 degrees! How are the tech giant Tencent and City of Helsinki using open data to create a Helsinki city guide to the Chinese WeChat platform. How is Whim  revolutionizing transportation with their Mobility as a service thinking, using open data, open APIs. Why did the National gallery release 12000 fine art images for free reuse. And, how can YOU create a more transparent, effective, creative and well-being world. Join us for three days of open data extravaganza!  Open knowledge, open collaboration, open society! Each year, on March 3, the international open day is celebrated across the world. This year, we are planning to be quite active and take a 360-degrees approach, and invite you to take part in some of the events. As the open data day is a Saturday, we thought it could be useful to have some program in the preceding days, too – to make sure have also the public sector and businesses involved. Hope you can pop in anytime at a time convenient for you – bring a friend, too!

Day 1: Kickoff to Open Data Day by Helsinki Loves Developers & Open Knowledge Finland

Thursday March 1, 2018 at 3-6 PM, The Shortcut Lab at Maria 01 (Door 15B) The first meetup that will be organized as a part of Open Data Day 2018 event series in Finland on 1st – 3rd March! During this Helsinki Loves Developers & OKFI event you will get a great view what has happened during the past years in terms of open data in Finland and which are the outcomes and benefits, what is happening at the moment and which are the next steps. This event is a great place to meet and discuss with open data advocates, users and other stakeholders. The aim of the event is to promote awareness and use of open data – especially to new audiences, like the startups at Maria 01. Meet new folks, hear cases like Whim (Mobility as a service, using open data and open APIs in transport) and Energy and climate atlas and solar energy potential (3D open data models). 15 – 15.45 What is open data? Where are we at, why should we care?
  • Open Data in a nutshell – what’s in it for me?
  • The Finnish Open Data Ecosystem is amazing!
15.45 – 17.15 Using open data for your business –
  • How Tencent and Helsinki worked together to bring a Helsinki guide to the Chinese WeChat platform
  • Whim – Mobility as a service revolutionizes public transport – using open data, open APIs, Jonna Pöllänen/MaaS Global
  • Energy and climate atlas and solar energy potential (3D) as open data – https://kartta.hel.fi/3d/atlas/ and https://kartta.hel.fi/3d/solar/ , Petteri Huuska
  • DOB for data-driven business, Jyrki Koskinen
  • How the National Gallery released 12000 artworks for free reuse
17.15 -> Dialogue and workshopping
  • What data do YOU need? How to make collaboration smoother Challenges in using open data
More cool surprises likely! The event space is The Shortcut Lab at Maria 01 – Door 15B. Call 040-5255153/Teemu or post to the event page, if you are having trouble finding the place. Sign up: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/940493522793115/ Meetup: https://www.meetup.com/Open-Data-Finland/events/247800446/

Day 2: Hands-on sessions and meetups of the projects and working groups of Open Knowledge Finland

Friday March 2, 2018 at 10 AM – 7 PM at Maria 01 (Door 15E) The day will end with the session #4 for the OKFI Strategy 2018-2023. Topics may include e.g. MyData, Lobbaus läpinäkyväksi – Transparency of Lobbying, new projects (Avoimet juuret, Wikidocumentaries, New Digital Rights), Open Science, AvoinGLAM, MyData, etc. Suggestions for specific activities are still welcome! Schedule 
  • 10 – 12.30 Project sessions, parallel tracks
  • 12.30 – 13.30 Lunch session on ResponsiveORG and open collaboration.
  • 13.30 – 15.30 Project sessions, parallel tracks
  • 16  – 17 AvoinGLAM working group meet
  • 17 – 19 Joint Open Knowledge Strategy session
  • 19 -> Open Beers?!
Lunch and snacks are on the house! Co-create the agenda at http://okf.fi/odd-2018 The event spaces are 2 large meeting rooms at Maria 01 – Door 15E. Call 040-5255153/Teemu or post to the event page, if you are having trouble finding the place. Sign up: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/172198743543043/ Meetup: https://www.meetup.com/Open-Data-Finland/events/246875734/

Day 3: Open Data Jam: Mapathons, Democrathon and Lightning Talks

Saturday March 3, 2018 at 10 AM – 4 PM at Maria 01 event space (Main door 15C, 2nd floor) This is the official Open Data Day. For us, it would be a combination of brunch, mapathons, wikidata democrathon and other stuff we co-create! Feel free to pop by when you have a chance! The programme will include at least the following:
  • Democratic Commons Democrathon The Democrathon, or Democratic commons workshop, is a session with the intention of adding and improving various national, regional and/or municipal political and legislative data in Wikidata for Finland. This builds nicely on the Vaalidatahack that YLE organized about a year ago, and is based on MySociety’s Democratic Commons project, see https://www.mysociety.org/2017/11/22/democratic-commons-open-data-infrastructure-for-democracy/. We will have a visiting expert from the UK hosting the event. Tony Bowden works for mySociety, he’s the project lead on mySociety’s  EveryPolitician/Wikidata project. EveryPolitician is Tony’s brainchild coming from his deep understanding that it’s impossible to create services to hold politicians to account if you’re not starting with good quality, consistent data. 
  • Three  mapathons for OpenStreetMap (OSM): Humanitarian OpenStreetMap (HOT-OSM), street views for OSM with Mapillary, and OSM mapping for local purposes.In mapathons people gather together to improve open maps. Experience in mapping is not needed, each mapathon includes guidance throughout the event. You may attend just a single mapathon or all of them – or just come to meet and chat with people in Finnish mapping communities, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team and OSM Finland. Most of the time is used for hands-on mapping or photographing outdoors.
    • The Mapillary mapathon takes us outdoors and allows anyone to share their street level photos to create street views or to help, for example, in OpenStreetMap editing.
    • In the Humanitarian OSM mapathon, a vulnerable area of the world is mapped, in order to support disaster risk reduction and response efforts, typically done using aerial images.
    • The OSM mapping for our local needs, for example Digitransit Journey Planner (HSL Reittiopas and opas.matka.fi) and your specific interests, utilizes aerial images and other data sources such as Mapillary photos. It is useful if you bring your own smartphone, laptop and mouse.
The event space are event space and meeting rooms on the 2nd floor of Maria 01, MAIN ENTRANCE. Call 040-5255153/Teemu or post to the event page, if you are having trouble finding the place. Sign up: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/532955153746624/ Meetup: https://www.meetup.com/Open-Data-Finland/events/246875754/   The Open Data Day activities are brought to you by Open Knowledge Finland, City of Helsinki – Hel <3 Developers, Wikimedia Finland, MySociety, The Shortcut, The Shuttleworth Foundation and of course Open Knowledge International. THANK YOU <3 The post Open Data Day 2018 is here – Welcome to 3 days of #opendata learn, think and do! appeared first on Open Knowledge Finland.

Firande av 250 år med Offentlighetsprincipen i Sverige genom lanseringen av FrågaStaten!

- September 28, 2016 in #mysociety, Alaveteli, Anders Chydenius, FrågaStaten, International Right to Know Day, Offentlighetsprincipen

Idag är en ganska speciell dag. Inte bara är det International Right To Know Day (Internationella Dagen för Rätten Att Veta), men i år är det också 250-jubiléet av världens första lagstiftning om informationsfrihet, som antogs i Sverige år 1766. Open Knowledge Sverige har valt denna betydelsefulla dag för att lansera betaversionen av FrågaStaten, den 28:e installationen med MySociety:s mjukvara Alaveteli för Offentlighetsprincipen (Freedom of Infromation). Detta skulle alltid ha varit en extra speciell lansering för MySociety: Alaveteli är uppkallad efter en liten stad, vid den tidpunkten svensk, som var hem till Offentlighetsprincipens förfader Anders Chydenius. Anders Chydenius spelade en avgörande roll i skapandet av 1766 års grundlagsstadgade tryckfrihetsförordning, som innehöll en lagstiftning om Offentlighetsprincipen i Sverige, internationellt kallat en “Freedom of Information Act”. Denna lagstiftning inskrev avskaffandet av politisk censur, och gav offentliga tjänstemän rätten till fritt visselblåsande, så kallad meddelarfrihet, för att avslöja korruption. Avgörande var också etablerandet av den första lagen för allmänhetens tillgång till statliga handlingar (inklusive rätten för vem som helst att få tillgång till dokument anonymt) – de första antydningar om vad som idag kallas Offentlighetsprincipen, eller rätt att få veta (The Right To Know). Så, 250 år senare, är MySociety och Open Knowledge Sverige glada att Alaveteli används nu i det land där Chydenius, och andra, kämpade hårt för att etablera världens första lag om Offentlighetsprincip och informationsfrihet för demokratisk insyn. FrågaStaten Framför allt, är MySociety mycket glada över att svenska medborgare nu har ett enkelt sätt att begära information från myndigheter; vilket i sin tur skapar ett online-arkiv med allmän kunskap som vem som helst kan få tillgång till. MySociety frågade Mattias från Open Knowledge Sverige, som samordnar projektet, om deras skäl för att sätta upp webbplatsen: Varför bestämde ni er för att sätta upp FrågaStaten? Sverige har skapat en berättelse om sig själv som en av de mest öppna länderna i världen. Med rätta, eftersom vi har en av de starkaste grundlagarna för demokratisk insyn och informationsfrihet. Men under det senaste århundradet och fram till i dag, har vi gått bakåt. Många journalister, jurister och historiker har uppmärksammat denna situation, men det har inte förändrats. Detta hotar vår demokrati och är mer av en fara för vårt samhälle än vad vi från början kan uppfatta. Problemet är att vår grundlag med Offentlighetsprincipen är skriven för det analoga och pappersbaserade samhället. Sedan tillkomsten av datorer, IT och Internet har Offentlighetsprincipen ännu inte fått en välbehövlig digitalisering – även om detta skulle skapa lika mycket värde idag som Tryckfrihetsförordningen gjorde från 1766 när den introducerades och framåt. Varför? Eftersom det skulle tvinga de svenska myndigheterna att släppa information digitalt. Idag klamrar sig myndigheter fortfarande fast på de sista resterna av ett pappersbaserat samhälle, genom att envist ge ut information till allmänheten på fysiska dokument även om de ända sen 2000-talets början rekommenderas att göra det elektroniskt. Samtidigt har Sverige bland den högsta användningen och täckningen av Internet bland sina medborgare, men digitaliseringen av den offentliga sektorn släpar efter resten av samhället och andra länder. Samtidigt är utvecklingen av öppna data för närvarande mycket långsam eller obefintlig. Detta är en situation som helt kan vändas till det positiva om politiska företrädare verkligen var engagerade att digitalisera vår Offentlighetsprincip eftersom öppna data är mycket mer värdefullt idag i vår informationsålder än det var för 250 år sedan. FrågaStaten kommer att uppmärksamma detta och visar också de många positiva resultat av detta scenario – så det är också anledningen till att vi gör detta. Vad fick dig att välja att använda programvaran Alaveteli för er plattform? Jag är en stark anhängare av öppen källkod, dess flexibilitet, kompatibilitet och potential och jag såg att Alaveteli var det alternativ som hade mest utveckling, underhåll och även en global gemenskap. Vilka är era framtidsplaner för området? Vårt uppdrag är att påskynda öppen digitalisering av Sverige och övergången till en öppen regering där dess medborgare verkligen kan hålla sin regering ansvarig. Denna plattform är ett viktigt experiment och en viktig grund för vår strategi att ansluta projekt, gemenskaper och initiativ som möjliggör öppen och social innovation. Vi har just ansökt om medel för ett sidoprojekt till FrågaStaten som avser att göra en systematisk granskning av hur den svenska staten och den offentliga sektorn sköter sig när det gäller att följa vår tryckfrihetsförordning och Offentlighetsprincipen i vår grundlag. Vi hoppas att det kommer att ansluta fler människor till saken och hjälpa till att lysa upp de mörka fläckarna av vår Offentlighetsprincip och Tryckfrihetsförordning, och hälsoläget hos vår svenska grundlag. — MySociety önskar Open Knowledge Sverige och FrågaStaten lycka till i att föra Offentlighetsprincipen i Sverige in i 2010-talet. Om du känner någon som vill begära information från svenska myndigheter, låt dem veta om FrågaStaten! Om du är sugen att höra mer om Anders Chydenius och den första lagen om Offentlighetsprincip, vänligen kolla in dessa kommande evenemang. Denna text förekom först på engelska hos Mysociety.org som skapat mjukvaran Alaveteli och verkar i England. Omslagsbild: Ian Insch (CC) vid Flickr.com

Firande av 250 år med Offentlighetsprincipen i Sverige genom lanseringen av FrågaStaten!

- September 28, 2016 in #mysociety, Alaveteli, Anders Chydenius, FrågaStaten, International Right to Know Day, Offentlighetsprincipen

Idag är en ganska speciell dag. Inte bara är det International Right To Know Day (Internationella Dagen för Rätten Att Veta), men i år är det också 250-jubiléet av världens första lagstiftning om informationsfrihet, som antogs i Sverige år 1766. Open Knowledge Sverige har valt denna betydelsefulla dag för att lansera betaversionen av FrågaStaten, den 28:e installationen med MySociety:s mjukvara Alaveteli för Offentlighetsprincipen (Freedom of Infromation). Detta skulle alltid ha varit en extra speciell lansering för MySociety: Alaveteli är uppkallad efter en liten stad, vid den tidpunkten svensk, som var hem till Offentlighetsprincipens förfader Anders Chydenius. Anders Chydenius spelade en avgörande roll i skapandet av 1766 års grundlagsstadgade tryckfrihetsförordning, som innehöll en lagstiftning om Offentlighetsprincipen i Sverige, internationellt kallat en “Freedom of Information Act”. Denna lagstiftning inskrev avskaffandet av politisk censur, och gav offentliga tjänstemän rätten till fritt visselblåsande, så kallad meddelarfrihet, för att avslöja korruption. Avgörande var också etablerandet av den första lagen för allmänhetens tillgång till statliga handlingar (inklusive rätten för vem som helst att få tillgång till dokument anonymt) – de första antydningar om vad som idag kallas Offentlighetsprincipen, eller rätt att få veta (The Right To Know). Så, 250 år senare, är MySociety och Open Knowledge Sverige glada att Alaveteli används nu i det land där Chydenius, och andra, kämpade hårt för att etablera världens första lag om Offentlighetsprincip och informationsfrihet för demokratisk insyn. FrågaStaten Framför allt, är MySociety mycket glada över att svenska medborgare nu har ett enkelt sätt att begära information från myndigheter; vilket i sin tur skapar ett online-arkiv med allmän kunskap som vem som helst kan få tillgång till. MySociety frågade Mattias från Open Knowledge Sverige, som samordnar projektet, om deras skäl för att sätta upp webbplatsen: Varför bestämde ni er för att sätta upp FrågaStaten? Sverige har skapat en berättelse om sig själv som en av de mest öppna länderna i världen. Med rätta, eftersom vi har en av de starkaste grundlagarna för demokratisk insyn och informationsfrihet. Men under det senaste århundradet och fram till i dag, har vi gått bakåt. Många journalister, jurister och historiker har uppmärksammat denna situation, men det har inte förändrats. Detta hotar vår demokrati och är mer av en fara för vårt samhälle än vad vi från början kan uppfatta. Problemet är att vår grundlag med Offentlighetsprincipen är skriven för det analoga och pappersbaserade samhället. Sedan tillkomsten av datorer, IT och Internet har Offentlighetsprincipen ännu inte fått en välbehövlig digitalisering – även om detta skulle skapa lika mycket värde idag som Tryckfrihetsförordningen gjorde från 1766 när den introducerades och framåt. Varför? Eftersom det skulle tvinga de svenska myndigheterna att släppa information digitalt. Idag klamrar sig myndigheter fortfarande fast på de sista resterna av ett pappersbaserat samhälle, genom att envist ge ut information till allmänheten på fysiska dokument även om de ända sen 2000-talets början rekommenderas att göra det elektroniskt. Samtidigt har Sverige bland den högsta användningen och täckningen av Internet bland sina medborgare, men digitaliseringen av den offentliga sektorn släpar efter resten av samhället och andra länder. Samtidigt är utvecklingen av öppna data för närvarande mycket långsam eller obefintlig. Detta är en situation som helt kan vändas till det positiva om politiska företrädare verkligen var engagerade att digitalisera vår Offentlighetsprincip eftersom öppna data är mycket mer värdefullt idag i vår informationsålder än det var för 250 år sedan. FrågaStaten kommer att uppmärksamma detta och visar också de många positiva resultat av detta scenario – så det är också anledningen till att vi gör detta. Vad fick dig att välja att använda programvaran Alaveteli för er plattform? Jag är en stark anhängare av öppen källkod, dess flexibilitet, kompatibilitet och potential och jag såg att Alaveteli var det alternativ som hade mest utveckling, underhåll och även en global gemenskap. Vilka är era framtidsplaner för området? Vårt uppdrag är att påskynda öppen digitalisering av Sverige och övergången till en öppen regering där dess medborgare verkligen kan hålla sin regering ansvarig. Denna plattform är ett viktigt experiment och en viktig grund för vår strategi att ansluta projekt, gemenskaper och initiativ som möjliggör öppen och social innovation. Vi har just ansökt om medel för ett sidoprojekt till FrågaStaten som avser att göra en systematisk granskning av hur den svenska staten och den offentliga sektorn sköter sig när det gäller att följa vår tryckfrihetsförordning och Offentlighetsprincipen i vår grundlag. Vi hoppas att det kommer att ansluta fler människor till saken och hjälpa till att lysa upp de mörka fläckarna av vår Offentlighetsprincip och Tryckfrihetsförordning, och hälsoläget hos vår svenska grundlag. — MySociety önskar Open Knowledge Sverige och FrågaStaten lycka till i att föra Offentlighetsprincipen i Sverige in i 2010-talet. Om du känner någon som vill begära information från svenska myndigheter, låt dem veta om FrågaStaten! Om du är sugen att höra mer om Anders Chydenius och den första lagen om Offentlighetsprincip, vänligen kolla in dessa kommande evenemang. Denna text förekom först på engelska hos Mysociety.org som skapat mjukvaran Alaveteli och verkar i England. Omslagsbild: Ian Insch (CC) vid Flickr.com

Firande av 250 år med Offentlighetsprincipen i Sverige genom lanseringen av FrågaStaten!

- September 28, 2016 in #mysociety, Alaveteli, Anders Chydenius, FrågaStaten, International Right to Know Day, Offentlighetsprincipen

Idag är en ganska speciell dag. Inte bara är det International Right To Know Day (Internationella Dagen för Rätten Att Veta), men i år är det också 250-jubiléet av världens första lagstiftning om informationsfrihet, som antogs i Sverige år 1766.

Open Knowledge Sverige har valt denna betydelsefulla dag för att lansera betaversionen av FrågaStaten, den 28:e installationen med MySociety:s mjukvara Alaveteli för Offentlighetsprincipen (Freedom of Infromation).

Detta skulle alltid ha varit en extra speciell lansering för MySociety: Alaveteli är uppkallad efter en liten stad, vid den tidpunkten svensk, som var hem till Offentlighetsprincipens förfader Anders Chydenius.

Anders Chydenius spelade en avgörande roll i skapandet av 1766 års grundlagsstadgade tryckfrihetsförordning, som innehöll en lagstiftning om Offentlighetsprincipen i Sverige, internationellt kallat en “Freedom of Information Act”.

Denna lagstiftning inskrev avskaffandet av politisk censur, och gav offentliga tjänstemän rätten till fritt visselblåsande, så kallad meddelarfrihet, för att avslöja korruption. Avgörande var också etablerandet av den första lagen för allmänhetens tillgång till statliga handlingar (inklusive rätten för vem som helst att få tillgång till dokument anonymt) – de första antydningar om vad som idag kallas Offentlighetsprincipen, eller rätt att få veta (The Right To Know).

Så, 250 år senare, är MySociety och Open Knowledge Sverige glada att Alaveteli används nu i det land där Chydenius, och andra, kämpade hårt för att etablera världens första lag om Offentlighetsprincip och informationsfrihet för demokratisk insyn.

FrågaStaten

Framför allt, är MySociety mycket glada över att svenska medborgare nu har ett enkelt sätt att begära information från myndigheter; vilket i sin tur skapar ett online-arkiv med allmän kunskap som vem som helst kan få tillgång till.

MySociety frågade Mattias från Open Knowledge Sverige, som samordnar projektet, om deras skäl för att sätta upp webbplatsen:

Varför bestämde ni er för att sätta upp FrågaStaten?

Sverige har skapat en berättelse om sig själv som en av de mest öppna länderna i världen. Med rätta, eftersom vi har en av de starkaste grundlagarna för demokratisk insyn och informationsfrihet.

Men under det senaste århundradet och fram till i dag, har vi gått bakåt. Många journalister, jurister och historiker har uppmärksammat denna situation, men det har inte förändrats. Detta hotar vår demokrati och är mer av en fara för vårt samhälle än vad vi från början kan uppfatta.

Problemet är att vår grundlag med Offentlighetsprincipen är skriven för det analoga och pappersbaserade samhället.

Sedan tillkomsten av datorer, IT och Internet har Offentlighetsprincipen ännu inte fått en välbehövlig digitalisering – även om detta skulle skapa lika mycket värde idag som Tryckfrihetsförordningen gjorde från 1766 när den introducerades och framåt. Varför? Eftersom det skulle tvinga de svenska myndigheterna att släppa information digitalt.

Idag klamrar sig myndigheter fortfarande fast på de sista resterna av ett pappersbaserat samhälle, genom att envist ge ut information till allmänheten på fysiska dokument även om de ända sen 2000-talets början rekommenderas att göra det elektroniskt. Samtidigt har Sverige bland den högsta användningen och täckningen av Internet bland sina medborgare, men digitaliseringen av den offentliga sektorn släpar efter resten av samhället och andra länder.

Samtidigt är utvecklingen av öppna data för närvarande mycket långsam eller obefintlig. Detta är en situation som helt kan vändas till det positiva om politiska företrädare verkligen var engagerade att digitalisera vår Offentlighetsprincip eftersom öppna data är mycket mer värdefullt idag i vår informationsålder än det var för 250 år sedan.

FrågaStaten kommer att uppmärksamma detta och visar också de många positiva resultat av detta scenario – så det är också anledningen till att vi gör detta.

Vad fick dig att välja att använda programvaran Alaveteli för er plattform?

Jag är en stark anhängare av öppen källkod, dess flexibilitet, kompatibilitet och potential och jag såg att Alaveteli var det alternativ som hade mest utveckling, underhåll och även en global gemenskap.

Vilka är era framtidsplaner för området?

Vårt uppdrag är att påskynda öppen digitalisering av Sverige och övergången till en öppen regering där dess medborgare verkligen kan hålla sin regering ansvarig. Denna plattform är ett viktigt experiment och en viktig grund för vår strategi att ansluta projekt, gemenskaper och initiativ som möjliggör öppen och social innovation.

Vi har just ansökt om medel för ett sidoprojekt till FrågaStaten som avser att göra en systematisk granskning av hur den svenska staten och den offentliga sektorn sköter sig när det gäller att följa vår tryckfrihetsförordning och Offentlighetsprincipen i vår grundlag. Vi hoppas att det kommer att ansluta fler människor till saken och hjälpa till att lysa upp de mörka fläckarna av vår Offentlighetsprincip och Tryckfrihetsförordning, och hälsoläget hos vår svenska grundlag.

MySociety önskar Open Knowledge Sverige och FrågaStaten lycka till i att föra Offentlighetsprincipen i Sverige in i 2010-talet. Om du känner någon som vill begära information från svenska myndigheter, låt dem veta om FrågaStaten!

Om du är sugen att höra mer om Anders Chydenius och den första lagen om Offentlighetsprincip, vänligen kolla in dessa kommande evenemang.

Denna text förekom först på engelska hos Mysociety.org som skapat mjukvaran Alaveteli och verkar i England.

Omslagsbild: Ian Insch (CC) vid Flickr.com

WhatDoTheyKnow Team Urge Caution When Using Excel to Depersonalise Data

- June 17, 2014 in #mysociety, community, Data Cleaning, HowTo, spreadsheets

[Guest Cross-post: from Myfanway Nixon of mySociety. You can learn more about her on her blog. The original post can be found here. Thanks for sharing!] mySociety’s Freedom of Information website WhatDoTheyKnow is used to make around 15 to 20% of FOI requests to central government departments and in total over 160,000 FOI requests have been made via the site. wdtklogo Occasionally, in a very small fraction of cases, public bodies accidentally release information in response to a FOI request which they intended to withhold. This has been happening for some time and there have been various ways in which public bodies have made errors. We have recently, though, come across a type of mistake public bodies have been making which we find particularly concerning as it has been leading to large accidental releases of personal information. What we believe happens is that when officers within public bodies attempt to prepare information for release using Microsoft Excel, they import personally identifiable information and an attempt is made to summarise it in anonymous form, often using pivot tables or charts. What those working in public bodies have been failing to appreciate is that while they may have hidden the original source data from their view, once they have produced a summary it is often still present in the Excel workbook and can easily be accessed. When pivot tables are used, a cached copy of the data will remain, even when the source data appears to have been deleted from the workbook. When we say the information can easily be accessed, we don’t mean by a computing genius but that it can be accessed by a regular user of Excel. We have seen a variety of public bodies, including councils, the police, and parts of the NHS, accidentally release personal information in this way. While the problem is clearly the responsibility of the public bodies, it does concern us because some of the material ends up on our website (it often ends up on public bodies’ own FOI disclosure logs too). We strive to run the WhatDoTheyKnow.com website in a responsible manner and promptly take down inappropriately released personal information from our website when our attention is drawn to it. There’s a button on every request thread for reporting it to the site’s administrators. As well as publishing this blog post in an effort to alert public bodies to the problem, and encourage them to tighten up their procedures, we’ve previously drawn attention to the issue of data in “hidden” tabs on Excel spreadsheets in our statement following an accidental release by Islington council; one of our volunteers has raised the issue at a training event for police FOI officers, and we’ve also been in direct contact with the Information Commissioner’s office both in relation to specific cases, and trying to help them understand the extent of the problem more generally.

Advice

Some of our suggestions:
  • Don’t release Excel pivot tables created from spreadsheets containing personal information, as the source data is likely to be still present in the Excel file.
  • Ensure those within an organisation who are responsible for anonymising data for release have the technical competence to fulfil their roles.
  • Check the file sizes. If a file is a lot bigger than it ought to be, it could be that there are thousands of rows of data still present in it that you don’t want to release.
  • Consider preparing information in a plain text format, eg. CSV, so you can review the contents of the file before release.
flattr this!