You are browsing the archive for napoleon.

Abide With Me (1914)

- April 30, 2019 in abide with me, brixham, death, English riviera, hymn, napoleon, Reverend Henry Francis Lyte, titanic, tuberculosis

Version from Olive Kline and Elsie Baker of one of the most popular hymn's of all time.

Napoleon’s “Englich” Lessons

- March 14, 2018 in could napoleon speak English, Count Emmanuel de Las Cases, exile, learning, napoleon, Saint Helena, st helena

While imprisoned on St Helena, Napoleon started learning English. One resident of the island called his English “the oddest in the world.”

Napoleon’s “Englich” Lessons

- March 14, 2018 in could napoleon speak English, Count Emmanuel de Las Cases, exile, learning, napoleon, Saint Helena, st helena

While imprisoned on St Helena, Napoleon started learning English. One resident of the island called his English “the oddest in the world.”

Napoleon’s “Englich” Lessons

- March 14, 2018 in could napoleon speak English, Count Emmanuel de Las Cases, exile, learning, napoleon, Saint Helena, st helena

While imprisoned on St Helena, Napoleon started learning English. One resident of the island called his English “the oddest in the world.”

Napoleon’s “Englich” Lessons

- March 14, 2018 in could napoleon speak English, Count Emmanuel de Las Cases, exile, learning, napoleon, Saint Helena, st helena

While imprisoned on St Helena, Napoleon started learning English. One resident of the island called his English “the oddest in the world.”

Maniac Chase (1904)

- March 9, 2017 in asylum, escape, insane asylum, insanity, lunatic asylum, mental illness, napoleon, Napoleon delusion

One of the very first screen depictions of the now familiar Napoleon delusion trope — in which a mentally ill person believes themselves to be Napoleon Bonaparte.

Maniac Chase (1904)

- March 9, 2017 in asylum, escape, insane asylum, insanity, lunatic asylum, mental illness, napoleon, Napoleon delusion

One of the very first screen depictions of the now familiar Napoleon delusion trope — in which a mentally ill person believes themselves to be Napoleon Bonaparte.

The Sketchbooks of Jacques-Louis David

- October 22, 2013 in collections, Digital Copy: No Additional Rights, France, french revolution, Images, Images-18th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-People, Jacques-Louis David, napoleon, rome, sketchbook, The Getty, Underlying Work: PD Worldwide

Selections from “Album 11″, a sketchbook belonging to the French neoclassical painter and revolutionary Jacques-Louis David. The sketches are from his student years in Rome in the 1770s, a time in which he became obsessed with the ancient and Renaissance art to be found in the city. During this period he made well over 1000 “Roman sketches” and relied on them as a visual resource throughout his career. Once returned to Paris, David dismantled his sketchbooks and reorganised the leaves into albums according to type, numbering 12 in total. This 11th album – held by the Getty Research Institute and included in The Getty’s Open Content program – is mainly concerned with studies of the bas-reliefs and sculptures from prominent Italian collections, including the ancient Roman paintings unearthed in Pompeii and Herculaneum. David was arguably the most influential European artist of the late 18th century, his thoughtful style of “history painting” marking a change in the moral climate at a crucial time in European history: the end of the Ancien Regime and birth of the French Revolution. David, a close friend of the revolutionary leader Maximilien Robespierre, was an active supporter of the French Revolution (he voted for the execution […]

Madame Tussaud’s Napoleon Relics, Pictures and Other Curiosities

- January 23, 2012 in curiosities, exhibition, madame tussaud, napoleon, non-article, relics, texts


Catalogue of Napoleon Relics, Pictures and Other Works of Art and Curiosities, compiled by W.Wheeler; 1901; Cassell, London.

Madame Tussaud’s 1901 Catalogue of Napoleon Relics, Pictures and Other Works of Art and Curiosities. Although famous for her wax work models, the Madame Tussaud’s exhibition also featured a weird and wonderful array of historical memorabilia, including: a scrap of the cravat Charles I wore on the morning of his execution; the shrunken head of a South American chief; the oriental costume of Richard Burton; and an incredible medley of Napoleonic relics including numerous carriages, a lock of his hair, the bedsheets of his death bed, and a strip of the willow tree under which he used to sit and was eventually buried when in exile.

Open Library link



Letters From a Cat (1879)

Castaway on the Auckland Isles: A Narrative of the Wreck of the "Grafton," (1865)


Infant's Cabinet of Birds and Beasts (1820)

Old French Fairytales (1920)

Armata: a fragment (1817)

An Account of the Late Improvements in Galvanism (1803)

The Medical Aspects of Death, and the Medical Aspects of the Human Mind (1852)

Quarles' Emblems (1886)

Cat and bird stories from the "Spectator" (1896)

Wonderful Balloon Ascents (1870)

The Book of Topiary (1904)

The Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (1899)

English as She is Spoke (1884)

The Danger of Premature Interment (1816)

The Last American (1889)

Pirates (1922)

Napoleon's Oraculum (1839)

Horse Laughs (1891)

Hydriotaphia/Urn-Burial and The Garden of Cyrus (1658)

Across the Zodiac: the Story of a Wrecked Record (1880)

Superstitions About Animals (1904)

The Diary of a Nobody (1919 edition)

The Attitudes of Animals in Motion, Illustrated with the Zoopraxiscope (1882)

The Eccentric Mirror: Reflecting a Faithful and Interesting Delineation of Male and Female Characters, Ancient and Modern (1807)

Uriah Jewett and the Sea Serpent of Lake Memphemagog (1917)

Yuletide Entertainments (1910)

Mythical Monsters (1886)

Madame Tussaud's Napoleon Relics, Pictures and Other Curiosities (1901)

James Joyce's Chamber Music (1918 American Edition)

Napoleon’s Oraculum (1839)

- September 5, 2011 in book of fate, napoleon, non-article, oraculum, texts


Napaleon’s Oraculum and Dreambook; 1839; S.N., New York.

The Oraculum had been originally discovered in one of the Royal tombs of Egypt during a French military expedition of 1801, and at Napoleon’s request was translated by a famous German scholar and antiquarian. Apparently consulting it “before every important occasion”, the book became one of the emperor’s most treasured possessions. It was found among his personal possessions after the defeat of his army at Leipzig in 1813 and translated into English in 1822.

Open Library link

There is also this more elaborate edition from 1923, which gives lots more information in its introductory pages, as well as a transcription of a note apparently found with Napoleon’s copy in his own handwriting detailing the answers he recieved from the Oraculum to a series of questions:


The Book of Fate, formerly in the possession of and used by Napoleon rendered into the English language by H. Kirchenhoffer, from a German translation of an ancient Egyptian manuscript found in the year 1801 by M. Sonnini in one of the royal tombs near Mount Libycus in Upper Egypt; 1923; H.S. Nichols, New York.

Open Library link





Letters From a Cat (1879)

Castaway on the Auckland Isles: A Narrative of the Wreck of the "Grafton," (1865)


Infant's Cabinet of Birds and Beasts (1820)

Old French Fairytales (1920)

Armata: a fragment (1817)

An Account of the Late Improvements in Galvanism (1803)

The Medical Aspects of Death, and the Medical Aspects of the Human Mind (1852)

Quarles' Emblems (1886)

Cat and bird stories from the "Spectator" (1896)

Wonderful Balloon Ascents (1870)

The Book of Topiary (1904)

The Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (1899)

English as She is Spoke (1884)

The Danger of Premature Interment (1816)

The Last American (1889)

Pirates (1922)

Napoleon's Oraculum (1839)

Horse Laughs (1891)