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Open Council Data of more than 100 Dutch municipalities reused in app WhereGovernment

- March 7, 2018 in netherlands, open council data, Open Data, Open Geodata, Open Government Data

This blog has been reposted from the Open State Foundation blog. More than a hundred Dutch municipalities release Open Council Data, including all documents of the municipal council – decisions, agendas, motions, amendments and policy documents – easily and collectively accessible. The data is now available for reuse in applications. Recently, the first app that reuses the data, WhereGovernment, was launched. 

Strengthen local democracy

Citizens, entrepreneurs, journalists, civil servants, journalists, scientists and all other interested parties can use Open Council Data to check easily what is going on in municipalities around a specific theme. Rural, regional, by municipality or even by neighborhood. In 2015 Open State Foundation, together with the Ministry of the Interior and five municipalities (Heerde, Oude IJsselstreek, Den Helder, Utrecht and Amstelveen), started a pilot to provide access to information as open data. In cooperation with VNG Realisatie and Argu, work was done on standardisation and upscaling. The goal is to strengthen local democracy.

Reusable local government data

The council information was already public, but only available per municipality and often not easy to find or reuse. Of 102 municipalities – including Amsterdam and Utrecht, but also smaller municipalities such as Binnenmaas and Dongen – all council documents can now be found on the Open Council Information website. These documents are available as open data: standardised and reusable. For example, app builders, websites, media and other parties can use and publish the information quickly and easily.

WhereGovernment app

To explore the possibilities of the Open Council Data, VNG Realisatie organised a competition in 2017 to develop the best app: the App Challenge Open Council Information. The first prize went to the webapp WaarOverheid of developer Qollap, which places council information on the map based on the basis of smart algorithms. This allows residents to see what is going on in their neighbourhood – or in a completely different neighbourhood. The app has been further developed with the prize money. From today – in the run-up to the municipal elections of 21 March 2018 – WaarGovernment can be used by everyone. Everything about the app WaarOverheid can be found on waaroverheid.nl.

Gold mine

Robert van Dijk, council clerk of the municipality of Teylingen and chairman of the advisory group Open Council Information, is enthusiastic about the results: ‘We can continue to talk about the theme of open government, but in order to achieve it we have to take action. The information society is a fact. Citizens can access unimaginable information via digital channels, but the government lags behind. And that while we are sitting on a huge amount of data. Society demands transparency from us, we have to get away from the back rooms. This is the instrument for that. In this way we can very effectively strengthen our democracy and make open government and open accountability possible. I see Open Council information as a gold mine. This standardisation is the starting point for upcoming projects and apps. If all municipalities join in later, nobody will have to use information from 380 islands to know which trends are going on. In short: a wonderful project.’ Open Council Information is part of the Digital Agenda 2020 and the Open Government Action Plan of the Netherlands (action point 6) with the Association of Netherlands Municipalities (VNG) in association with Open State Foundation, the driver of the Open Council Information project, and various local authorities and the Ministry of Interior and Kingdom Relations.  

Open Council Data of more than 100 Dutch municipalities reused in app WhereGovernment

- March 7, 2018 in netherlands, open council data, Open Data, Open Geodata, Open Government Data

This blog has been reposted from the Open State Foundation blog. More than a hundred Dutch municipalities release Open Council Data, including all documents of the municipal council – decisions, agendas, motions, amendments and policy documents – easily and collectively accessible. The data is now available for reuse in applications. Recently, the first app that reuses the data, WhereGovernment, was launched. 

Strengthen local democracy

Citizens, entrepreneurs, journalists, civil servants, journalists, scientists and all other interested parties can use Open Council Data to check easily what is going on in municipalities around a specific theme. Rural, regional, by municipality or even by neighborhood. In 2015 Open State Foundation, together with the Ministry of the Interior and five municipalities (Heerde, Oude IJsselstreek, Den Helder, Utrecht and Amstelveen), started a pilot to provide access to information as open data. In cooperation with VNG Realisatie and Argu, work was done on standardisation and upscaling. The goal is to strengthen local democracy.

Reusable local government data

The council information was already public, but only available per municipality and often not easy to find or reuse. Of 102 municipalities – including Amsterdam and Utrecht, but also smaller municipalities such as Binnenmaas and Dongen – all council documents can now be found on the Open Council Information website. These documents are available as open data: standardised and reusable. For example, app builders, websites, media and other parties can use and publish the information quickly and easily.

WhereGovernment app

To explore the possibilities of the Open Council Data, VNG Realisatie organised a competition in 2017 to develop the best app: the App Challenge Open Council Information. The first prize went to the webapp WaarOverheid of developer Qollap, which places council information on the map based on the basis of smart algorithms. This allows residents to see what is going on in their neighbourhood – or in a completely different neighbourhood. The app has been further developed with the prize money. From today – in the run-up to the municipal elections of 21 March 2018 – WaarGovernment can be used by everyone. Everything about the app WaarOverheid can be found on waaroverheid.nl.

Gold mine

Robert van Dijk, council clerk of the municipality of Teylingen and chairman of the advisory group Open Council Information, is enthusiastic about the results: ‘We can continue to talk about the theme of open government, but in order to achieve it we have to take action. The information society is a fact. Citizens can access unimaginable information via digital channels, but the government lags behind. And that while we are sitting on a huge amount of data. Society demands transparency from us, we have to get away from the back rooms. This is the instrument for that. In this way we can very effectively strengthen our democracy and make open government and open accountability possible. I see Open Council information as a gold mine. This standardisation is the starting point for upcoming projects and apps. If all municipalities join in later, nobody will have to use information from 380 islands to know which trends are going on. In short: a wonderful project.’ Open Council Information is part of the Digital Agenda 2020 and the Open Government Action Plan of the Netherlands (action point 6) with the Association of Netherlands Municipalities (VNG) in association with Open State Foundation, the driver of the Open Council Information project, and various local authorities and the Ministry of Interior and Kingdom Relations.  

Strange Contests in the Netherlands

- March 17, 2015 in competitions, contests, Curator's Choice, Featured, netherlands, Public Domain

CURATOR’S CHOICE #20: HARRY VAN BIESSUM FROM OPEN IMAGES Harry van Biessum, from Open Images, gives a little tour through some of the collection’s stranger films, in particular those Dutch newsreels from the 1930s which centred on reporting a wide-variety of bizarre competitions. Competition can drive people mad and make them do strange things. Especially […]

The iron man of all hackathons in the Benelux is near.

- September 5, 2014 in dutchopenhackathon, Events, Featured, hackathon, netherlands

The Dutch Open Hackathon, the ‘iron man’ of all hackathons in the Benelux is near and it still has a 100 spaces left. This hackathon, organised by Open State will go down in two weeks in Amsterdam.

Why should you participate?

It’s big, a ’100 spaces’ left means that around 400 hackers and developers already confirmed. Yup, that’s a hackathon of around 500 people in teams of 2 to 5 people. That will be a once in a lifetime opportunity.

It’s a new hackathon experience

A lot of companies just opened their API for this event. This means you have a lot of options for making an application with data you don’t really have access to. Time to be creative and show what you can do by driving global innovation. Screen Shot 2014-09-05 at 10.03.59

You can make a change

Corporate and Private owned Open Data is still very scarce and this is a perfect way to convince big companies of the usefulness of Open Data and Open API’s. By showing them that Open Data should not be limited by public governments and transparency combined with co-creation within big private companies is viable option as well.

Because Belgian hackers are not to be underestimated

Arjan-Al-Fassed, the organiser didn’t believe me when I said the Belgian participants of hackathons are true innovators. Just to prove my point I want to get as many Belgians to Amsterdam as possible. And because our Dutch colleagues are doing amazing things regarding Open Data and Open innovation as well, it is good to meet up and hack together. Because innovation has no borders, so exchanging experience and ideas are always the way to go. Belgian Open Data Hackers Convinced? If not, please visit the Dutch Open Hackathon website, they provide a lot of information about the API’s and the goal of the event. If you are, here is the practical information you need to get there: You can register for the event here.

Practical:

It’s on 20 and 21 september 2014 It’s a 30-hour Hackathon It’s at the IJtoren Amsterdam, Piet Heinkade 55 in Amsterdam

Programme

Saturday 09.00 Participant registration 10.00 Welcome – start hackathon 12.00 Lunch 20.00 Walking dinner + speaker 22.00 Night activity 00.00 … all nighter… Sunday 08.00 Breakfast 12.00 Sub jury pitching (90 seconds video + Q&A session) 14.00 All 90-second videos are shown on screen on main stage 15.00 Top 10 pitching for jury on main stage 16.00 Award ceremony 17.00 End Contact: Open State Foundation Arjan El Fassed Tel: +31 (0)20-308-0567 / +31 (0)6-21703833 If you are heading to Amsterdam in two weeks, let us know! We’ll be rooting for all the Belgian teams.

The Writings of J.F. Martinet (1729-1795)

- March 4, 2014 in dutch books, martinet, netherlands

KONINKLIJKE BIBLIOTHEEK - Marieke van Delft discusses some works by the prolific writer Johannes Florentius Martinet (1729-1795), digitized in the Early Dutch Books Online (EDBO) Project.

The Writings of J.F. Martinet (1729-1795)

- March 4, 2014 in dutch books, martinet, netherlands

KONINKLIJKE BIBLIOTHEEK - Marieke van Delft discusses some works by the prolific writer Johannes Florentius Martinet (1729-1795), digitized in the Early Dutch Books Online (EDBO) Project.

The Somersault Man (1923)

- July 26, 2013 in acrobatics, collections, Digital Copy: Share Alike, Films, Films: 1920s, Films: Clip, Films: Documentary, netherlands, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, Open Images, somersault, Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions

A short silent clip from a Dutch newsreel showing a man somersaulting through the streets. Housed at: Open Images | From: Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision Underlying Work: No Known Copyright Restrictions | Digital Copy: Share Alike Download: Ogg | Mpeg4 HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription! Name: E-mail:

Hortus Malabaricus (1678-1693)

- July 13, 2012 in botany, flora, Hendrik van Rheede, Images, Images-17th, Images-Engraving-Line, Images-Science, india, Kerala, netherlands, non-article, plant anatomy

Selected illustrations from the stunning Hortus Malabaricus (Garden of Malabar), an epic treatise dealing with the medicinal properties of the flora in the Indian state of Kerala. Originally written in Latin, it was compiled over a period of nearly 30 years and published in Amsterdam between 1678 and 1693 in 12 volumes of about 500 pages each, with a total of 794 copper plate engravings. The book was conceived by Hendrik van Rheede, who was the Governor of Dutch Malabar at the time, and he is said to have taken a keen personal interest in the compilation. The work was edited by a team of nearly a hundred including physicians (such as Ranga Bhat, Vinayaka Pandit, Appu Bhat and Itti Achuden) professors of medicine and botany, amateur botanists (such as Arnold Seyn, Theodore Jansson of Almeloveen, Paul Hermann, Johannes Munnicks, Joannes Commelinus, Abraham a Poot), and technicians, illustrators and engravers, together with the collaboration of company officials, clergymen (D. John Caesarius and the Discalced Carmelite Mathaeus of St. Joseph’s Monastery at Varapuzha). Van Rheede was also assisted by the King of Cochin and the ruling Zamorin of Calicut. Prominent among the Indian contributors were three Gouda Saraswat Brahmins named Ranga Bhat, Vinayaka Pandit,Appu Bhat and Malayali physician, Itti Achuden, who was an Ezhava doctor of the Mouton Coast of Malabar. The book has been translated into English and Malayalam by Dr. K. S. Manilal. (Wikipedia)

(All images from the Biodiversity Heritage Library who house scans of all 12 volumes from the Missouri Botanical Garden Library. You can also find them on the Internet Archive).











































































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