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Open Data goes local in Nepal: Findings of Nepal Open Data Index 2015

- January 8, 2016 in Data Survey, nepal, npindex15, Open Data, Open Data Index, Survey

Index whitepaper

Nepal Open Data Index 2015 – White paper

The Local Open Data Index Nepal 2015 is a crowdsourced survey that examines the availability of Open Data at city level. The survey was conducted for the second time in Nepal by Open Knowledge Nepal. See our previous post that announced the local index here.

Background

For the decentralization of power from central authority to district, village and municipality levels, Nepal government use Local Self Governance Regulation, 2056 (1999). where Village Development Committee (VDC) and District Development Committees (DDC) both act as planners and program implementing bodies of the government. Where municipalities are also doing the same kinds of tasks but at smaller scale, it has created difficulties in understanding layers of governing units. This overlapping of powers and roles has also been found in the government data space; average citizens still don’t know which local governance units are responsible for the data they need. This highlights the importance of a survey around open data and publishing. Global surveys such as the Global Open Data Index and Open Data Barometer taught us that availability of open data and participatory governance in Nepal is not reaching full potential in terms of everything from citizen readiness, to data release and data  infrastructure in Nepal. Using World Wide Web Foundation terminology, in Nepal we are operating in a “capacity constrained” environment. Furthermore, in Nepal citizen participation and using open data often makes more sense and is more powerful at local level as it is local governments that handle all national and international project for citizens and generates data from it. However, open data is still a new concept in Nepal and the central government has only just started releasing data, with data even less available at the local level.

Why do we need a Local Open Data Index in Nepal?

The Local Open Data Index is intended to help to put the discrepancies of local level on the map (literally!). Peter Drucker said, “What gets measured gets managed.” Mapping the gaps will aid strategic planning and help create a framework for action and citizen engagement at all levels. For local governments to adopt openness, they need to understand the what, why and how of opening up their data. Government need to learn why making data open is not only a means to make them accountable (or worse – alarmed), but also a tool to help them become more efficient and effective in their work. Governments need to understand that opening data is only the beginning of participatory governance, and for them to participate they need well defined and easy-to-adopt mechanisms. The Local Open Data Index for Nepal will help in assessing the baseline of availability and nature of open data in Nepali cities. This will help to identify gaps, and plan strategic actions to make maximum impact.

Summary

A survey was done in 10 major cities of Nepal by open data enthusiasts and volunteers inside and outside of Open Knowledge Nepal. The cities chosen were Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, Butwal, Chitwan, Dolakha, Dhading, Hetauda, Kavre, Lalitpur, and Pokhara.
The datasets that we survey were Annual Budget, Procurement Contracts, Crime Statistics, Business Permits, Traffic Accident, and Air Quality. Unsurprisingly, the largest municipality and the capital of Nepal – Kathmandu – ranked highest, followed by Pokhara and Chitwan. Different datasets were available in all 10 cities in digital format on the government websites. All available datasets are free to access. However, none of the datasets were machine readable, nor were any datasets licensed with any of the standard open data licences. Datasets regarding annual budgets and procurement contracts are easily available digitally, although not open in standard sense of the term. Datasets for air quality are virtually nonexistent. It is not clear whether data is available in categories such as Traffic Accidents or Business Permits. The central government of Nepal has been slowly adopting open data as a policy, and has shown commitment through projects such as the Aid Management Platform, Election Data, and interactive visualization available in National Planning Commission website. The enthusiasm is growing, but, has not yet spread to local governing authorities.

Key Findings

  1. None of the data sets are completely open. All of them lack machine readability and standard licensing.
  2. Annual budget data is publicly available in almost all cities surveyed. Air quality data is not available in any city. Other datasets fall somewhere in between.
  3. The enthusiasm and progress shown by central government in terms of open data projects has yet to catch on at the local level.
Read more about it in the official white paper.

Open Data goes local in Nepal: Findings of Nepal Open Data Index 2015

- January 8, 2016 in Data Survey, nepal, npindex15, Open Data, Open Data Index, Survey

Index whitepaper

Nepal Open Data Index 2015 – White paper

The Local Open Data Index Nepal 2015 is a crowdsourced survey that examines the availability of Open Data at city level. The survey was conducted for the second time in Nepal by Open Knowledge Nepal. See our previous post that announced the local index here.

Background

For the decentralization of power from central authority to district, village and municipality levels, Nepal government use Local Self Governance Regulation, 2056 (1999). where Village Development Committee (VDC) and District Development Committees (DDC) both act as planners and program implementing bodies of the government. Where municipalities are also doing the same kinds of tasks but at smaller scale, it has created difficulties in understanding layers of governing units. This overlapping of powers and roles has also been found in the government data space; average citizens still don’t know which local governance units are responsible for the data they need. This highlights the importance of a survey around open data and publishing. Global surveys such as the Global Open Data Index and Open Data Barometer taught us that availability of open data and participatory governance in Nepal is not reaching full potential in terms of everything from citizen readiness, to data release and data  infrastructure in Nepal. Using World Wide Web Foundation terminology, in Nepal we are operating in a “capacity constrained” environment. Furthermore, in Nepal citizen participation and using open data often makes more sense and is more powerful at local level as it is local governments that handle all national and international project for citizens and generates data from it. However, open data is still a new concept in Nepal and the central government has only just started releasing data, with data even less available at the local level.

Why do we need a Local Open Data Index in Nepal?

The Local Open Data Index is intended to help to put the discrepancies of local level on the map (literally!). Peter Drucker said, “What gets measured gets managed.” Mapping the gaps will aid strategic planning and help create a framework for action and citizen engagement at all levels. For local governments to adopt openness, they need to understand the what, why and how of opening up their data. Government need to learn why making data open is not only a means to make them accountable (or worse – alarmed), but also a tool to help them become more efficient and effective in their work. Governments need to understand that opening data is only the beginning of participatory governance, and for them to participate they need well defined and easy-to-adopt mechanisms. The Local Open Data Index for Nepal will help in assessing the baseline of availability and nature of open data in Nepali cities. This will help to identify gaps, and plan strategic actions to make maximum impact.

Summary

A survey was done in 10 major cities of Nepal by open data enthusiasts and volunteers inside and outside of Open Knowledge Nepal. The cities chosen were Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, Butwal, Chitwan, Dolakha, Dhading, Hetauda, Kavre, Lalitpur, and Pokhara. The datasets that we survey were Annual Budget, Procurement Contracts, Crime Statistics, Business Permits, Traffic Accident, and Air Quality. Unsurprisingly, the largest municipality and the capital of Nepal – Kathmandu – ranked highest, followed by Pokhara and Chitwan. Different datasets were available in all 10 cities in digital format on the government websites. All available datasets are free to access. However, none of the datasets were machine readable, nor were any datasets licensed with any of the standard open data licences. Datasets regarding annual budgets and procurement contracts are easily available digitally, although not open in standard sense of the term. Datasets for air quality are virtually nonexistent. It is not clear whether data is available in categories such as Traffic Accidents or Business Permits. The central government of Nepal has been slowly adopting open data as a policy, and has shown commitment through projects such as the Aid Management Platform, Election Data, and interactive visualization available in National Planning Commission website. The enthusiasm is growing, but, has not yet spread to local governing authorities.

Key Findings

  1. None of the data sets are completely open. All of them lack machine readability and standard licensing.
  2. Annual budget data is publicly available in almost all cities surveyed. Air quality data is not available in any city. Other datasets fall somewhere in between.
  3. The enthusiasm and progress shown by central government in terms of open data projects has yet to catch on at the local level.
Read more about it in the official white paper.

Open Data goes local in Nepal: Findings of Nepal Open Data Index 2015

- January 8, 2016 in Data Survey, nepal, npindex15, Open Data, Open Data Index, Survey

Index whitepaper

Nepal Open Data Index 2015 – White paper

The Local Open Data Index Nepal 2015 is a crowdsourced survey that examines the availability of Open Data at city level. The survey was conducted for the second time in Nepal by Open Knowledge Nepal. See our previous post that announced the local index here.

Background

For the decentralization of power from central authority to district, village and municipality levels, Nepal government use Local Self Governance Regulation, 2056 (1999). where Village Development Committee (VDC) and District Development Committees (DDC) both act as planners and program implementing bodies of the government. Where municipalities are also doing the same kinds of tasks but at smaller scale, it has created difficulties in understanding layers of governing units. This overlapping of powers and roles has also been found in the government data space; average citizens still don’t know which local governance units are responsible for the data they need. This highlights the importance of a survey around open data and publishing. Global surveys such as the Global Open Data Index and Open Data Barometer taught us that availability of open data and participatory governance in Nepal is not reaching full potential in terms of everything from citizen readiness, to data release and data  infrastructure in Nepal. Using World Wide Web Foundation terminology, in Nepal we are operating in a “capacity constrained” environment. Furthermore, in Nepal citizen participation and using open data often makes more sense and is more powerful at local level as it is local governments that handle all national and international project for citizens and generates data from it. However, open data is still a new concept in Nepal and the central government has only just started releasing data, with data even less available at the local level.

Why do we need a Local Open Data Index in Nepal?

The Local Open Data Index is intended to help to put the discrepancies of local level on the map (literally!). Peter Drucker said, “What gets measured gets managed.” Mapping the gaps will aid strategic planning and help create a framework for action and citizen engagement at all levels. For local governments to adopt openness, they need to understand the what, why and how of opening up their data. Government need to learn why making data open is not only a means to make them accountable (or worse – alarmed), but also a tool to help them become more efficient and effective in their work. Governments need to understand that opening data is only the beginning of participatory governance, and for them to participate they need well defined and easy-to-adopt mechanisms. The Local Open Data Index for Nepal will help in assessing the baseline of availability and nature of open data in Nepali cities. This will help to identify gaps, and plan strategic actions to make maximum impact.

Summary

A survey was done in 10 major cities of Nepal by open data enthusiasts and volunteers inside and outside of Open Knowledge Nepal. The cities chosen were Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, Butwal, Chitwan, Dolakha, Dhading, Hetauda, Kavre, Lalitpur, and Pokhara.
The datasets that we survey were Annual Budget, Procurement Contracts, Crime Statistics, Business Permits, Traffic Accident, and Air Quality. Unsurprisingly, the largest municipality and the capital of Nepal – Kathmandu – ranked highest, followed by Pokhara and Chitwan. Different datasets were available in all 10 cities in digital format on the government websites. All available datasets are free to access. However, none of the datasets were machine readable, nor were any datasets licensed with any of the standard open data licences. Datasets regarding annual budgets and procurement contracts are easily available digitally, although not open in standard sense of the term. Datasets for air quality are virtually nonexistent. It is not clear whether data is available in categories such as Traffic Accidents or Business Permits. The central government of Nepal has been slowly adopting open data as a policy, and has shown commitment through projects such as the Aid Management Platform, Election Data, and interactive visualization available in National Planning Commission website. The enthusiasm is growing, but, has not yet spread to local governing authorities.

Key Findings

  1. None of the data sets are completely open. All of them lack machine readability and standard licensing.
  2. Annual budget data is publicly available in almost all cities surveyed. Air quality data is not available in any city. Other datasets fall somewhere in between.
  3. The enthusiasm and progress shown by central government in terms of open data projects has yet to catch on at the local level.
Read more about it in the official white paper.

Nepal Open Data Index 2015

- December 15, 2015 in Cities Survey, Nepal Index, Nepal Open Data Index 2015, Nepal Survey, npindex15, Open Data, Open Survey

Nepal Open Data Index measures the openness of key data published by Nepal Government’s local bodies, Metropolitan City Offices, Sub-metropolitan City Offices, District Development Committees (DDC), Village Development Committees (VDC) etc. The main reason of running Nepal Open Data Index 2015 is to measure and monitor the state of open data across the local cities of Nepal. We believe, the Index is one right and easy tool where we can gather data availability from where publishers can also get encouragement to improve their published data standards and can peer-review everything. This will help in assessing the baseline of availability and nature of open data in Nepali cities so that we can identify gaps and plan actions to make maximum impact for minimum effort. Each local city can also check their open datasets’ quality by comparing their data with others cities’ datasets. The another aim is to motivate and pressurize local bodies of Nepal government to publish their data under Open Definition / Open Format so that we can increase re-usability of government data. “Open Data is data that can be freely used, modified and shared by anyone for any purpose”. This will increase transparency and accountability of government and will bring innovation inside government data. Citizen participation will be increased and we can improve government efficiency and policy making. 10 Cities for Survey Last year, we measured openness of only two cities of Nepal, they were Kathmandu and Chitwan but from this year (2015) we have made some big changes. We will be measuring the openness of 10 cities of Nepal. We made this combination of ten cities by mixing some developed and developing cities of Nepal. By doing this we want to motivate those developing cities and want to show developed cities as an example. This year we will be surveying: Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, Butwal, Chitwan, Dolakha, Dhading, Hetauda, Kavre, Lalitpur, Pokhara. Datasets to Use By looking at the condition of supply and demand side of data at our country Nepal, we have decreased our datasets in Nepal Open Data Index 2015. In past years we used 15 datasets they were: Real-Time Transit, Annual Budget, Expenditure (detailed), Election results, Air Quality, Transport Timetables, Public Facilities, Crime statistics, Procurement contracts, Food safety inspections, Traffic accidents, Building permits, Service Requests, Business Permits, Business Listings. But this year to use all this 15 datasets for an survey in a small developing country like Nepal, we found is somehow un-necessary so, from this year (2015) we decided to use only 6 datasets and they are:
  1. Annual Budget : Municipal budget at a high level (e.g. spending by sector, department etc). This category is about budgets which are plans for expenditure (not actual expenditure in the past).
  2. Procurement Contract : Per contract information on municipal contracts including amount, awardee (name, address), date awarded etc.
  3. Crime Statistics : Data on municipal crime, preferably at a reasonably disaggregated level (best would be exact date, location and type but per day per street or post/zip code would be acceptable).
  4. Business Permits : Data of registered Business Permits / Licenses.
  5. Traffic Accident : Statistics on road traffic accidents including time and location.
  6. Air Quality : Data on air quality (e.g. levels of major pollutants) on a granular basis – that is at least broken down by month (preferably by day). Geographic breakdown (e.g. by grid point) would be nice but is not required.
How we are gathering data Like Global Open Data Index , Nepal Open Data Index is also a crowdsourced survey and open for everyone. Anyone from every corner of the world can submit their information but only member of Open Knowledge Nepal can review it.  But, to make Index more accurate and trustworthy, we assigned 10 local contributor / volunteers for 10 cities concept. Kudos to our contributors: Kathmandu – Nikesh Balami (nikeshbalami@gmail.com) Bhaktapur – Shristi Baral (baral.shristi@gmail.com) Butwal – Hemanta Rijal (foreverhemanta221@gmail.com) Chitwan – Arun Kumar Pyasi (info@arun.info.np) Dolakha – Sagar Ghimire (info@sagarg.com.np), Dhading – Rajan Silwal (silwalrajan18@gmail.com) Hetauda – Ujjwal Hetuwal (Ujjwalhatuwal@gmail.com) Kavre – Sandeep Neupane (deep.newsun@gmail.com) Lalitpur – Firoj Ghimire (firojghimire@gmail.com) Pokhara – Sushil Magar (np.msushil@gmail.com) Our volunteer Shubham Ghimire (shubhamghimire1996@gmail.com) helped all contributors throughout the process.    

Nepal Open Data Index 2015

- December 15, 2015 in Cities Survey, Nepal Index, Nepal Open Data Index 2015, Nepal Survey, npindex15, Open Data, Open Survey

Nepal Open Data Index measures the openness of key data published by Nepal Government’s local bodies, Metropolitan City Offices, Sub-metropolitan City Offices, District Development Committees (DDC), Village Development Committees (VDC) etc. The main reason of running Nepal Open Data Index 2015 is to measure and monitor the state of open data across the local cities of Nepal. We believe, the Index is one right and easy tool where we can gather data availability from where publishers can also get encouragement to improve their published data standards and can peer-review everything. This will help in assessing the baseline of availability and nature of open data in Nepali cities so that we can identify gaps and plan actions to make maximum impact for minimum effort. Each local city can also check their open datasets’ quality by comparing their data with others cities’ datasets. The another aim is to motivate and pressurize local bodies of Nepal government to publish their data under Open Definition / Open Format so that we can increase re-usability of government data. “Open Data is data that can be freely used, modified and shared by anyone for any purpose”. This will increase transparency and accountability of government and will bring innovation inside government data. Citizen participation will be increased and we can improve government efficiency and policy making. 10 Cities for Survey Last year, we measured openness of only two cities of Nepal, they were Kathmandu and Chitwan but from this year (2015) we have made some big changes. We will be measuring the openness of 10 cities of Nepal. We made this combination of ten cities by mixing some developed and developing cities of Nepal. By doing this we want to motivate those developing cities and want to show developed cities as an example. This year we will be surveying: Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, Butwal, Chitwan, Dolakha, Dhading, Hetauda, Kavre, Lalitpur, Pokhara. Datasets to Use By looking at the condition of supply and demand side of data at our country Nepal, we have decreased our datasets in Nepal Open Data Index 2015. In past years we used 15 datasets they were: Real-Time Transit, Annual Budget, Expenditure (detailed), Election results, Air Quality, Transport Timetables, Public Facilities, Crime statistics, Procurement contracts, Food safety inspections, Traffic accidents, Building permits, Service Requests, Business Permits, Business Listings. But this year to use all this 15 datasets for an survey in a small developing country like Nepal, we found is somehow un-necessary so, from this year (2015) we decided to use only 6 datasets and they are:
  1. Annual Budget : Municipal budget at a high level (e.g. spending by sector, department etc). This category is about budgets which are plans for expenditure (not actual expenditure in the past).
  2. Procurement Contract : Per contract information on municipal contracts including amount, awardee (name, address), date awarded etc.
  3. Crime Statistics : Data on municipal crime, preferably at a reasonably disaggregated level (best would be exact date, location and type but per day per street or post/zip code would be acceptable).
  4. Business Permits : Data of registered Business Permits / Licenses.
  5. Traffic Accident : Statistics on road traffic accidents including time and location.
  6. Air Quality : Data on air quality (e.g. levels of major pollutants) on a granular basis – that is at least broken down by month (preferably by day). Geographic breakdown (e.g. by grid point) would be nice but is not required.
How we are gathering data Like Global Open Data Index , Nepal Open Data Index is also a crowdsourced survey and open for everyone. Anyone from every corner of the world can submit their information but only member of Open Knowledge Nepal can review it.  But, to make Index more accurate and trustworthy, we assigned 10 local contributor / volunteers for 10 cities concept. Kudos to our contributors: Kathmandu – Nikesh Balami (nikeshbalami@gmail.com) Bhaktapur – Shristi Baral (baral.shristi@gmail.com) Butwal – Hemanta Rijal (foreverhemanta221@gmail.com) Chitwan – Arun Kumar Pyasi (info@arun.info.np) Dolakha – Sagar Ghimire (info@sagarg.com.np), Dhading – Rajan Silwal (silwalrajan18@gmail.com) Hetauda – Ujjwal Hatuwal (Ujjwalhatuwal@gmail.com) Kavre – Sandeep Neupane (deep.newsun@gmail.com) Lalitpur – Firoj Ghimire (firojghimire@gmail.com) Pokhara – Sushil Magar (np.msushil@gmail.com) Our volunteer Shubham Ghimire (shubhamghimire1996@gmail.com) helped all contributors throughout the process.    

Nepal Open Data Index 2015

- December 15, 2015 in Cities Survey, Nepal Index, Nepal Open Data Index 2015, Nepal Survey, npindex15, Open Data, Open Survey

Nepal Open Data Index measures the openness of key data published by Nepal Government’s local bodies, Metropolitan City Offices, Sub-metropolitan City Offices, District Development Committees (DDC), Village Development Committees (VDC) etc. The main reason of running Nepal Open Data Index 2015 is to measure and monitor the state of open data across the local cities of Nepal. We believe, the Index is one right and easy tool where we can gather data availability from where publishers can also get encouragement to improve their published data standards and can peer-review everything. This will help in assessing the baseline of availability and nature of open data in Nepali cities so that we can identify gaps and plan actions to make maximum impact for minimum effort. Each local city can also check their open datasets’ quality by comparing their data with others cities’ datasets. The another aim is to motivate and pressurize local bodies of Nepal government to publish their data under Open Definition / Open Format so that we can increase re-usability of government data. “Open Data is data that can be freely used, modified and shared by anyone for any purpose”. This will increase transparency and accountability of government and will bring innovation inside government data. Citizen participation will be increased and we can improve government efficiency and policy making. 10 Cities for Survey Last year, we measured openness of only two cities of Nepal, they were Kathmandu and Chitwan but from this year (2015) we have made some big changes. We will be measuring the openness of 10 cities of Nepal. We made this combination of ten cities by mixing some developed and developing cities of Nepal. By doing this we want to motivate those developing cities and want to show developed cities as an example. This year we will be surveying: Kathmandu, Bhaktapur, Butwal, Chitwan, Dolakha, Dhading, Hetauda, Kavre, Lalitpur, Pokhara. Datasets to Use By looking at the condition of supply and demand side of data at our country Nepal, we have decreased our datasets in Nepal Open Data Index 2015. In past years we used 15 datasets they were: Real-Time Transit, Annual Budget, Expenditure (detailed), Election results, Air Quality, Transport Timetables, Public Facilities, Crime statistics, Procurement contracts, Food safety inspections, Traffic accidents, Building permits, Service Requests, Business Permits, Business Listings. But this year to use all this 15 datasets for an survey in a small developing country like Nepal, we found is somehow un-necessary so, from this year (2015) we decided to use only 6 datasets and they are:
  1. Annual Budget : Municipal budget at a high level (e.g. spending by sector, department etc). This category is about budgets which are plans for expenditure (not actual expenditure in the past).
  2. Procurement Contract : Per contract information on municipal contracts including amount, awardee (name, address), date awarded etc.
  3. Crime Statistics : Data on municipal crime, preferably at a reasonably disaggregated level (best would be exact date, location and type but per day per street or post/zip code would be acceptable).
  4. Business Permits : Data of registered Business Permits / Licenses.
  5. Traffic Accident : Statistics on road traffic accidents including time and location.
  6. Air Quality : Data on air quality (e.g. levels of major pollutants) on a granular basis – that is at least broken down by month (preferably by day). Geographic breakdown (e.g. by grid point) would be nice but is not required.
How we are gathering data Like Global Open Data Index , Nepal Open Data Index is also a crowdsourced survey and open for everyone. Anyone from every corner of the world can submit their information but only member of Open Knowledge Nepal can review it.  But, to make Index more accurate and trustworthy, we assigned 10 local contributor / volunteers for 10 cities concept. Kudos to our contributors: Kathmandu – Nikesh Balami (nikeshbalami@gmail.com) Bhaktapur – Shristi Baral (baral.shristi@gmail.com) Butwal – Hemanta Rijal (foreverhemanta221@gmail.com) Chitwan – Arun Kumar Pyasi (info@arun.info.np) Dolakha – Sagar Ghimire (info@sagarg.com.np), Dhading – Rajan Silwal (silwalrajan18@gmail.com) Hetauda – Ujjwal Hatuwal (Ujjwalhatuwal@gmail.com) Kavre – Sandeep Neupane (deep.newsun@gmail.com) Lalitpur – Firoj Ghimire (firojghimire@gmail.com) Pokhara – Sushil Magar (np.msushil@gmail.com) Our volunteer Shubham Ghimire (shubhamghimire1996@gmail.com) helped all contributors throughout the process.