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Open Data Day events, MyData Japan 2017 and other OK Japan updates

Open Knowledge Japan - May 18, 2017 in network, OK Japan

This blog post is part of our on-going Network series featuring updates from chapters across the Open Knowledge Network and was written by the Open Knowledge Japan team.

International Open Data Day

We had a lot of localities joining the International Open Data Day (IODD) – the international website for the IODD shows 42 localities in Japan, but our listing shows 65. OK Japan members helped promote the event via pre-event, social media, and the Japanese website. We saw a lot of discussions, hackathons, and some mapping parties, among others. Many ‘Code For’s’ were involved in hosting the event.

Open Knowledge Japan Award at VLED

Annually, OK Japan joins a group of other organisations celebrating major and noteworthy achievements in open data in Japan, by issuing unsolicited awards to whoever we think deserves the annual award. We are happy to share that this year OK Japan awarded the digitisation project of classic Japanese materials by the National Institute of Japanese Literature and Center for Open Data in the Humanities. Their dataset includes some cooking books from Edo Period, and some recipes are modified and put into modern Japanese language and released in the Edo period recipe section of largest recipe sharing site in Japan, Cookpad.
This year’s awardees (in Japanese) include the legislators who worked on the basic law for government and private sector data use promotion, which now provide legal ground for open data (see below), which is the best award; health-related open data by Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare; and one-stop search on meeting minutes and transcripts of prefectural and major city legislatures by Bitlet and Yasuo Oda, and so many more.

Basic law to promote data use, including open data

The Japanese Parliament passed a law on data use in early December 2016. Under the law, the Japanese government creates a new high-level committee to promote data usage. National and prefectural governments are required under this law to develop their plans to disseminate easily usable data online. Municipal governments and private sector businesses are also expected to make efforts to help the cause. The goal is to gain economic benefits.

MyData Japan 2017

Inspired by the event hosted by OK Finland, MyData 2016, some attendees and others interested in the proper and active use of personal data have decided to hold MyData Japan 2017. The OK Japan Chapter will serve as the host and organiser of this whole-day event, which takes place on 19 May 2017 in Tokyo. Contact Tomoaki Watanabe [tomoaki.watanabe@gmail.com], the coordinator of Open Knowledge Japan for more information regarding their events and activities. 

Network update from OK Japan: Corporate transparency and taxpayers’ money ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

Open Knowledge Japan - January 19, 2017 in Chapters, Chapters updates, godi, japan, network, OK Japan, Open Spending

This blog post is part of our on-going Network series featuring updates from chapters across the Open Knowledge Network and was written by the Open Knowledge Japan team. The OK Japan chapter has been active in the open data space in activities such as the promotion of open data use and policy discussions. Since we formed the team in 2012, our members have been instrumental in promoting International Open Data Day in Japan and OpenSpending/ Where Does My Money Go. We published use cases and other notable developments in the space through our blog. Our members also took part in many different government boards, advised or worked with municipalities and departments on open data implementation. Below is some news about us and open data developments in Japan.

Transparency discussed

Late October, Open Knowledge Japan has co-organized, with OpenCorporates Japan an event discussing corporate ID and transparency issues, including the Panama Papers. The keynote talk was given by Chris Taggart, CEO and founder of OpenCorporates, who was visiting Tokyo that time.

okjapanChris Taggart and Japanese experts discussing transparency issues in Tokyo

Work meeting held for Global Open Data Census

We hosted an informal meeting inviting key government officials to work on the Global Open Data Census. The Census scores and Japan’s ranking have been discussed in the open data policy circle.

Relevance of open knowledge for Japan

Aside from what we did lately, there are recent news reports that make open knowledge issues very relevant in the country. Related to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, we have been learning about many allegations of shady processes. For example, some large sums of tax money reported going from our government to an unnamed “consultant” so that Tokyo could become the host city for the 2020 Olympics. Tokyo has also been involved in other transparency issues – the governor resigned this year after criticisms related to his spending and lack of clear explanations on those, and was given a vote of no-confidence. The new governor uncovered additional problems with the ongoing project of relocating the Tsukiji market, the largest fish market in Tokyo, including potential underground water contamination.

tokyo_tower_special_lightup_invitation_for_2020_olympic_games_on_march_2013Image Credit: Tokyo Tower Special Lightup <Invitation for 2020 Olympic Games> (Shibakouen, Tokyo, Japan) (CC BY)

In the early part of 2017, we will be working towards International Open Data Day 2017. Japan has been one of the most active countries in terms of the number of localities participating in IODD in the past few years (with more than 60 cities participating in 2016!). Some of the issues we will be discussing through this and other occasions include the above-mentioned data plans that the national and prefectural governments will create, as well wider use of Open Spending Next that some of our members have started learning.

Network update from OK Japan: Corporate transparency and taxpayers’ money ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

Open Knowledge Japan - January 19, 2017 in Chapters, Chapters updates, godi, japan, network, OK Japan, Open Spending

This blog post is part of our on-going Network series featuring updates from chapters across the Open Knowledge Network and was written by the Open Knowledge Japan team. The OK Japan chapter has been active in the open data space in activities such as the promotion of open data use and policy discussions. Since we formed the team in 2012, our members have been instrumental in promoting International Open Data Day in Japan and OpenSpending/ Where Does My Money Go. We published use cases and other notable developments in the space through our blog. Our members also took part in many different government boards, advised or worked with municipalities and departments on open data implementation. Below is some news about us and open data developments in Japan.

Transparency discussed

Late October, Open Knowledge Japan has co-organized, with OpenCorporates Japan an event discussing corporate ID and transparency issues, including the Panama Papers. The keynote talk was given by Chris Taggart, CEO and founder of OpenCorporates, who was visiting Tokyo that time.

okjapanChris Taggart and Japanese experts discussing transparency issues in Tokyo

Work meeting held for Global Open Data Census

We hosted an informal meeting inviting key government officials to work on the Global Open Data Census. The Census scores and Japan’s ranking have been discussed in the open data policy circle.

Relevance of open knowledge for Japan

Aside from what we did lately, there are recent news reports that make open knowledge issues very relevant in the country. Related to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, we have been learning about many allegations of shady processes. For example, some large sums of tax money reported going from our government to an unnamed “consultant” so that Tokyo could become the host city for the 2020 Olympics. Tokyo has also been involved in other transparency issues – the governor resigned this year after criticisms related to his spending and lack of clear explanations on those, and was given a vote of no-confidence. The new governor uncovered additional problems with the ongoing project of relocating the Tsukiji market, the largest fish market in Tokyo, including potential underground water contamination.

tokyo_tower_special_lightup_invitation_for_2020_olympic_games_on_march_2013Image Credit: by t-mizo Tokyo Tower Special Lightup <Invitation for 2020 Olympic Games> (Shibakouen, Tokyo, Japan) (CC BY 2.0)

In the early part of 2017, we will be working towards International Open Data Day 2017. Japan has been one of the most active countries in terms of the number of localities participating in IODD in the past few years (with more than 60 cities participating in 2016!). Some of the issues we will be discussing through this and other occasions include the above-mentioned data plans that the national and prefectural governments will create, as well wider use of Open Spending Next that some of our members have started learning.